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I'm trying to learn Git with the help of Git Immersion. There's one thing that frustrates me whenever I use git log or git diff:

Git log shows (END) marker

I can't figure out what to do next when I encounter this (END) word. I can't type any commands and I end up closing the current bash and open another. How do I type in the next command that I want to use?

marked as duplicate by janot, Jakuje, Toby Speight, Dan, Brent Washburne Apr 15 '16 at 19:47

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    gosh, this question was pretty hard to google, I was already going to ask my own. Thank you and larsmans! – lonelyass Sep 28 '12 at 8:12
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    Even after I use q+Enter to quit, the <END> reappears every time I begin typing again. It eats up my first character. Thereafter, I'm able to type the command I want. However, I'd rather not have this behavior at all. I'm on Windows. Suggestions? – Puneet Lamba Nov 9 '14 at 17:10
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    Windows users: you must type q+enter first. Once you escape with cntl+c, you'll be stuck in that weird loop. Use ONLY q+enter to exit. – STWilson Nov 25 '16 at 17:31
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    It's possible to break out by repeatedly typing q+enter+q+enter+q+enter until the end of time no matter what the console shows. – SoonDead Mar 14 '17 at 10:36
up vote 796 down vote accepted

You're in the less program, which makes the output of git log scrollable.

Type q to exit this screen. Type h to get help.

If you don't want to read the output in a pager and want it to be just printed to the terminal define the environment variable GIT_PAGER to cat or set core.pager to cat (execute git config --global core.pager cat).

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    I kept on pressing q: as one would do to get out of vi! Thanks! – TastyCode Aug 13 '13 at 19:55
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    @Affan: To quit vi use :q. q: opens a command window which can be exited with :q (but this won't quit vi then). – Benjamin Bannier Aug 26 '13 at 22:53
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    Simplest way to avoid the pager just once: "git log | cat". I also like to do "git log > /tmp/foo" and then view /tmp/foo in the editor of my choice. For some reason, that works better for me. – Edward Falk May 16 '14 at 16:01
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    q: was what I needed in Win 7. Just Q leads to bizarre behavior where it keeps bouncing back between command prompt and this vi or pseudo-win-vi thing. – Erik Reppen May 21 '15 at 20:11
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    I have core.pager = cat in my .gitconfig, so git commands just print their output unless I explicitly pipe it through less. – Keith Thompson Apr 30 '16 at 0:21

You can press q to exit.

git hist is using a pager tool so you can scroll up and down the results before returning to the console.

The END comes from the pager used to display the log (your are at that moment still inside it). Type q to exit it.

Add following alias in the .bashrc file

git --no-pager log --oneline -n 10
  • --no-pager will encounter the (END) word
  • -n 10 will show only the last 10 commits
  • --oneline will show the commit message, ignore the author, date information
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    git --no-pager is a thing I was looking for, thanks! – Zapko Jul 4 '17 at 19:57

Actually, there are three ways to do it, precisely.

Type any of the following 3 commands.

  1. :q
  2. :z
    or
  3. Ctrl + z.

P.S.: Sometimes, for someone, one of these options doesn't seem to work and for others it works.

I wanted to give some kudos to the comment that mentioned CTRL + Z as an option. At the end of the day, it's going to depend on what system that you have Git installed on and what program is configured to open text files (e.g. less vs. vim). CTRL + Z works for vim on Windows.

If you're using Git in a Windows environment, there are some quirks. Just helps to know what they are. (i.e. Notepad vs. Nano, etc.).

In this case, as snarly suggested, typing q is the intended way to quit git log (as with most other pagers or applications that use pagers).

However normally, if you just want to abort a command that is currently executing, you can try ctrl+c (doesn't seem to work for git log, however) or ctrl+z (although in bash, ctrl-z will freeze the currently running foreground process, which can then be thawed as a background process with the bg command).

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