When I execute this

regex='^[-a-z0-9]+$'
string='abcd1--'
if [[ $string =~ $regex ] -a ![ grep - "--" ]]
then 
    echo "valid"
else
    echo "not valid"
fi

I get

~$ sh t.sh 
t.sh: line 3: syntax error in conditional expression
t.sh: line 3: syntax error near `]'
t.sh: line 3: `if [[ $string =~ $regex ] -a [ grep - "--" ]]'
~$ 

It is suppose to return not valid.

Can someone figure out what's wrong?

  • 2
    Your syntax for [[ is incorrect. – Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Feb 28 '12 at 14:39
  • 1
    You have to execute the script using bash, not sh (which usually is (d)ash). There is no =~ operator using the test utility (which is being used by (d)ash). – Gandaro Feb 28 '12 at 14:49
up vote 6 down vote accepted

You're mixing [ and [[ syntax in a strange way.

Try:

if [[ ( $string =~ $regex ) && !( $string =~ "--" ) ]]

and check bash's man page.

  • note, /usr/bin/[ is not part of bash, and its special syntax is accessible with man test not man bash. – Benoit Feb 28 '12 at 14:49
  • bash does use a built-in [ if it can. (See the test expr part of the bash man page.) – Mat Feb 28 '12 at 14:52
  • oh, you're right, there is a builtin test command, I did not know it. thanks for pointing it out. – Benoit Feb 28 '12 at 14:53
  • When I search for [[ in the bash manpage, I don't get any matches. What is the difference of [, (, and [[ ? – Sandra Schlichting Feb 28 '12 at 15:08
  • 1
    gnu.org/software/bash/manual/… - [ is an "alias" for test, ( is just a grouping parenthesis, [[ is another form of conditional construct. – Mat Feb 28 '12 at 15:14

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