82

I want to change the value of the variable declared outside the loop within a loop. But always changing, it keeps the initial value outside the loop.

{% set foo = False %}

{% for item in items %}
  {% set foo = True %}
  {% if foo %} Ok(1)! {% endif %}
{% endfor %}

{% if foo %} Ok(2)! {% endif %}

This renders:

Ok(1)!

So the only (bad) solution have found so far was this:

{% set foo = [] %}

{% for item in items %}
  {% if foo.append(True) %} {% endif %}
  {% if foo %} Ok(1)! {% endif %}
{% endfor %}

{% if foo %} Ok(2)! {% endif %}

This renders:

Ok(1)!
Ok(2)!

But, its is very ugly! Is there another more elegant solution?

5
  • 5
    I don't think there is any other way. Perhaps you could restructure the code so that you don't need to set the variable. Feb 28 '12 at 17:25
  • 3
    +1 for the question, as it became answer for me :)
    – Glen Swift
    Oct 17 '13 at 15:05
  • 1
    @Shankar Cabus: great question. This should probably be classified under Jinja Annoyances
    – dreftymac
    Sep 14 '15 at 16:19
  • 1
    I think this is question is duplicated in: stackoverflow.com/questions/7537439/… and stackoverflow.com/questions/4870346/… (just starting, can't flag the question) You can use Pashka's approach, and add jinja2.ext.do to clean it a little bit Mar 22 '17 at 22:28
  • I found this code to be the only way to workaround construct that I was unable to use in salt+jinja: somelist|map(format)|join
    – Martin
    Aug 10 '17 at 12:05
82

Try also dictionary-based approach. It seems to be less ugly.

{% set vars = {'foo': False} %}

{% for item in items %}
  {% if vars.update({'foo': True}) %} {% endif %}
  {% if vars.foo %} Ok(1)! {% endif %}
{% endfor %}

{% if vars.foo %} Ok(2)! {% endif %}

This also renders:

Ok(1)!
Ok(2)!
5
  • 9
    Still ugly, but it works. I'm quite surprised there is no Pythonic way of doing this with jinja2.
    – kramer65
    Dec 3 '15 at 9:15
  • 1
    Definitely a bit cleaner especially if you need more than one variable
    – Ade Miller
    Jul 20 '16 at 20:16
  • 1
    TLDR, does set vars just plain not work in a for loop? Feb 15 '17 at 21:10
  • 3
    @kramer65: Solutions appear to be in the works: github.com/pallets/jinja/pull/684; github.com/pallets/jinja/pull/676 May 25 '17 at 15:19
  • @ThorSummoner seems like it. I have been hearing a lot of people praise python. They are just cooking with water as well.
    – Toskan
    Sep 13 '17 at 10:52
55

as mentioned in the documentation:

Please note that assignments in loops will be cleared at the end of the iteration and cannot outlive the loop scope.

but as of version 2.10 you can use namespaces:

    {% set ns = namespace(foo=false) %}      
    {% for item in items %}
      {% set ns.foo = True %}
      {% if ns.foo %} Ok(1)! {% endif %}
    {% endfor %}

    {% if ns.foo %} Ok(2)! {% endif %}
2
  • 3
    Where you say namespace(foo=false) is the lowercase f in False a jinja2 colloquialism or did you mean False, as python requires for boolean values?
    – mas
    Jul 12 '18 at 18:16
  • 6
    the lowercase false is part of jinja's convention: " The special constants true, false, and none are indeed lowercase. Because that caused confusion in the past, (True used to expand to an undefined variable that was considered false), all three can now also be written in title case (True, False, and None). However, for consistency, (all Jinja identifiers are lowercase) you should use the lowercase versions."
    – Omer
    Jul 16 '18 at 13:52
0

You could do this to clean up the template code

{% for item in items %}
  {{ set_foo_is_true(local_vars) }}
  {% if local_vars.foo %} Ok(1)! {% endif %}
{% endfor %}
{% if local_vars.foo %} Ok(2)! {% endif %}

And in the server code use

items = ['item1', 'item2', 'item3']
#---------------------------------------------
local_vars = { 'foo': False }
def set_foo_is_true(local_vars):
  local_vars['foo'] = True
  return ''
env.globals['set_foo_is_true'] = set_foo_is_true    
#---------------------------------------------
return env.get_template('template.html').render(items=items, local_vars=local_vars)

This could be generalized to the following

{{ set_local_var(local_vars, "foo", False) }}
{% for item in items %}
  {{ set_local_var(local_vars, "foo", True) }}
  {% if local_vars.foo %} Ok(1)! {% endif %}
{% endfor %}
{% if local_vars.foo %} Ok(2)! {% endif %}

And in the server code use

items = ['item1', 'item2', 'item3']
#---------------------------------------------
local_vars = { 'foo': False }
def set_local_var(local_vars, name, value):
  local_vars[name] = value
  return ''
env.globals['set_local_var'] = set_local_var
#---------------------------------------------
return env.get_template('template.html').render(items=items, local_vars=local_vars)

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