8

I have two kernel modules (say modA and modB). modA exports a symbol with EXPORT_SYMBOL(symA) and modB uses it. I have the header modA.h for modA:

...
extern void symA(int param);
...

and in modB.c:

#include "modA.h"
...
static int __init modB_init(void)
{
    symA(10);
}
...

If i insmod modB all works fine, my modB is correctly linked in the kernel and the function symA is correctly called. However when i build modB the compiler raises a warning: symA is undefined. An LKM is an ELF relocatable so why the compiler raises this warning? How can be this removed?

1 Answer 1

12

This issue (and how to compile correctly in this case) is explained in http://www.kernel.org/doc/Documentation/kbuild/modules.txt

Sometimes, an external module uses exported symbols from another external module. kbuild needs to have full knowledge of all symbols to avoid spitting out warnings about undefined symbols. Three solutions exist for this situation.

NOTE: The method with a top-level kbuild file is recommended but may be impractical in certain situations.

Use a top-level kbuild file If you have two modules, foo.ko and bar.ko, where foo.ko needs symbols from bar.ko, you can use a common top-level kbuild file so both modules are compiled in the same build. Consider the following directory layout:

  ./foo/ <= contains foo.ko       ./bar/ <= contains bar.ko

  The top-level kbuild file would then look like:

  #./Kbuild (or ./Makefile):          obj-y := foo/ bar/

  And executing

      $ make -C $KDIR M=$PWD

  will then do the expected and compile both modules with         full

knowledge of symbols from either module.

Use an extra Module.symvers file When an external module is built, a Module.symvers file is generated containing all exported symbols which are not defined in the kernel. To get access to symbols from bar.ko, copy the Module.symvers file from the compilation of bar.ko to the directory where foo.ko is built. During the module build, kbuild will read the Module.symvers file in the directory of the external module, and when the build is finished, a new Module.symvers file is created containing the sum of all symbols defined and not part of the kernel.

Use "make" variable KBUILD_EXTRA_SYMBOLS If it is impractical to copy Module.symvers from another module, you can assign a space separated list of files to KBUILD_EXTRA_SYMBOLS in your build file. These files will be loaded by modpost during the initialization of its symbol tables.

1
  • Great! I missed that. Thank you Gossamer! Feb 29, 2012 at 14:33

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.