192

In Web API I had a class of similar structure:

public class SomeController : ApiController
{
    [WebGet(UriTemplate = "{itemSource}/Items")]
    public SomeValue GetItems(CustomParam parameter) { ... }

    [WebGet(UriTemplate = "{itemSource}/Items/{parent}")]
    public SomeValue GetChildItems(CustomParam parameter, SomeObject parent) { ... }
}

Since we could map individual methods, it was very simple to get the right request at the right place. For similar class which had only a single GET method but also had an Object parameter, I successfully used IActionValueBinder. However, in the case described above I get the following error:

Multiple actions were found that match the request: 

SomeValue GetItems(CustomParam parameter) on type SomeType

SomeValue GetChildItems(CustomParam parameter, SomeObject parent) on type SomeType

I am trying to approach this problem by overriding the ExecuteAsync method of ApiController but with no luck so far. Any advice on this issue?

Edit: I forgot to mention that now I am trying to move this code on ASP.NET Web API which has a different approach to routing. The question is, how do I make the code work on ASP.NET Web API?

6
  • 1
    Have you still got the {parent} as RouteParameter.Optional? Feb 29, 2012 at 19:10
  • Yes, I did. Maybe I am using the IActionValueBinder the wrong way because for types such as int id (as in the demo) it does work fine.
    – paulius_l
    Feb 29, 2012 at 19:39
  • Sorry, I should have been clearer. I would've thought that having it as optional would mean it matches the Item route as well as the sub-items route, which would explain the error message you're seeing. Feb 29, 2012 at 19:48
  • We are currently having the disscussion, if the approaches below (with multiple routes) are against proper REST rules? In my opinion this is fine. My coworker thinks it's not nice. Any comments on this?
    – Remy
    Aug 30, 2012 at 14:13
  • I was generally against it when started reading about REST. I am still not sure if that is a proper approach but sometimes it is more convenient or user-friendly, so slightly bending the rules might not be so bad. As long as it works to solve a specific problem. 6 months have already passed since I have posted this question and we have not had any regrets for using this approach since.
    – paulius_l
    Aug 30, 2012 at 15:04

20 Answers 20

266

This is the best way I have found to support extra GET methods and support the normal REST methods as well. Add the following routes to your WebApiConfig:

routes.MapHttpRoute("DefaultApiWithId", "Api/{controller}/{id}", new { id = RouteParameter.Optional }, new { id = @"\d+" });
routes.MapHttpRoute("DefaultApiWithAction", "Api/{controller}/{action}");
routes.MapHttpRoute("DefaultApiGet", "Api/{controller}", new { action = "Get" }, new { httpMethod = new HttpMethodConstraint(HttpMethod.Get) });
routes.MapHttpRoute("DefaultApiPost", "Api/{controller}", new {action = "Post"}, new {httpMethod = new HttpMethodConstraint(HttpMethod.Post)});

I verified this solution with the test class below. I was able to successfully hit each method in my controller below:

public class TestController : ApiController
{
    public string Get()
    {
        return string.Empty;
    }

    public string Get(int id)
    {
        return string.Empty;
    }

    public string GetAll()
    {
        return string.Empty;
    }

    public void Post([FromBody]string value)
    {
    }

    public void Put(int id, [FromBody]string value)
    {
    }

    public void Delete(int id)
    {
    }
}

I verified that it supports the following requests:

GET /Test
GET /Test/1
GET /Test/GetAll
POST /Test
PUT /Test/1
DELETE /Test/1

Note That if your extra GET actions do not begin with 'Get' you may want to add an HttpGet attribute to the method.

9
  • 4
    This is a great answer and it helped me a lot with another related question. Thanks!! Oct 30, 2012 at 0:17
  • 4
    Tried this -- does not appear to work. The routes are all randomly mapped to the GetBlah(long id) method. :( Jun 17, 2013 at 12:06
  • 1
    @BrainSlugs83: It depends on the order. And you will want to add (to the "withId" methods), a constraints: new{id=@"\d+"} Jun 17, 2013 at 16:13
  • 4
    how about adding one more method - Get(int id, string name) ? ...it fails Jun 24, 2013 at 9:45
  • 1
    I had to add an extra route like this routes.MapHttpRoute("DefaultApiPut", "Api/{controller}", new {action = "Put"}, new {httpMethod = new HttpMethodConstraint(HttpMethod.Put)}); for my Put method otherwise it was giving me 404. Oct 19, 2015 at 6:54
64

Go from this:

config.Routes.MapHttpRoute("API Default", "api/{controller}/{id}",
            new { id = RouteParameter.Optional });

To this:

config.Routes.MapHttpRoute("API Default", "api/{controller}/{action}/{id}",
            new { id = RouteParameter.Optional });

Hence, you can now specify which action (method) you want to send your HTTP request to.

posting to "http://localhost:8383/api/Command/PostCreateUser" invokes:

public bool PostCreateUser(CreateUserCommand command)
{
    //* ... *//
    return true;
}

and posting to "http://localhost:8383/api/Command/PostMakeBooking" invokes:

public bool PostMakeBooking(MakeBookingCommand command)
{
    //* ... *//
    return true;
}

I tried this in a self hosted WEB API service application and it works like a charm :)

3
  • 8
    Thanks for the helpful answer. I'd like to add that if you start your method names with Get, Post, etc., your requests will map to those methods based on the HTTP verb used. But you can also name your methods anything, and then decorate them with the [HttpGet], [HttpPost], etc. attributes to map the verb to the method.
    – egbrad
    Jun 12, 2013 at 19:21
  • kindly see my question
    – Moeez
    Oct 11, 2017 at 6:23
  • @DikaArtaKarunia no problem, glad that my answer is still applicable 6 years later :D
    – uggeh
    Feb 21, 2019 at 9:19
39

I find attributes to be cleaner to use than manually adding them via code. Here is a simple example.

[RoutePrefix("api/example")]
public class ExampleController : ApiController
{
    [HttpGet]
    [Route("get1/{param1}")] //   /api/example/get1/1?param2=4
    public IHttpActionResult Get(int param1, int param2)
    {
        Object example = null;
        return Ok(example);
    }

}

You also need this in your webapiconfig

config.Routes.MapHttpRoute(
    name: "DefaultApi",
    routeTemplate: "api/{controller}/{id}",
    defaults: new { id = RouteParameter.Optional }
);

config.Routes.MapHttpRoute(
    name: "ActionApi",
    routeTemplate: "api/{controller}/{action}/{id}",
    defaults: new { id = RouteParameter.Optional }
);

Some Good Links http://www.asp.net/web-api/overview/getting-started-with-aspnet-web-api/tutorial-your-first-web-api This one explains routing better. http://www.asp.net/web-api/overview/web-api-routing-and-actions/routing-in-aspnet-web-api

2
  • 3
    I needed to also add config.MapHttpAttributeRoutes(); to my WebApiConfig.cs, and GlobalConfiguration.Configuration.EnsureInitialized(); at the end of my WebApiApplication.Application_Start() method to get route attributes to work.
    – Ergwun
    Feb 23, 2017 at 5:10
  • @Ergwun This comment helped me a lot. Just to add to it, config.MapHttpAttributeRoutes(); needs to appear before the route mapping (e.g. before config.Routes.MappHttpRoute(.... Mar 5, 2019 at 17:11
15

In VS 2019, this works with ease:

[Route("api/[controller]/[action]")] //above the controller class

And in the code:

[HttpGet]
[ActionName("GetSample1")]
public Ilist<Sample1> GetSample1()
{
    return getSample1();
}
[HttpGet]
[ActionName("GetSample2")]
public Ilist<Sample2> GetSample2()
{
    return getSample2();
}
[HttpGet]
[ActionName("GetSample3")]
public Ilist<Sample3> GetSample3()
{
    return getSample3();
}
[HttpGet]
[ActionName("GetSample4")]
public Ilist<Sample4> GetSample4()
{
    return getSample4();
}

You can have multiple gets like above mentioned.

11

You need to define further routes in global.asax.cs like this:

routes.MapHttpRoute(
    name: "Api with action",
    routeTemplate: "api/{controller}/{action}/{id}",
    defaults: new { id = RouteParameter.Optional }
);

routes.MapHttpRoute(
    name: "DefaultApi",
    routeTemplate: "api/{controller}/{id}",
    defaults: new { id = RouteParameter.Optional }
);
3
  • 5
    Yep that's true but it would be nice to actually see an example of those routes. It would make this answer more valuable to the community. (and you'd get a +1 from me:) Oct 24, 2012 at 2:32
  • You can read an example here - stackoverflow.com/questions/11407267/… Nov 27, 2012 at 11:11
  • 2
    An actual solution would have been nicer. Dec 30, 2012 at 20:27
8

With the newer Web Api 2 it has become easier to have multiple get methods.

If the parameter passed to the GET methods are different enough for the attribute routing system to distinguish their types as is the case with ints and Guids you can specify the expected type in the [Route...] attribute

For example -

[RoutePrefix("api/values")]
public class ValuesController : ApiController
{

    // GET api/values/7
    [Route("{id:int}")]
    public string Get(int id)
    {
       return $"You entered an int - {id}";
    }

    // GET api/values/AAC1FB7B-978B-4C39-A90D-271A031BFE5D
    [Route("{id:Guid}")]
    public string Get(Guid id)
    {
       return $"You entered a GUID - {id}";
    }
} 

For more details about this approach, see here http://nodogmablog.bryanhogan.net/2017/02/web-api-2-controller-with-multiple-get-methods-part-2/

Another options is to give the GET methods different routes.

    [RoutePrefix("api/values")]
    public class ValuesController : ApiController
    {
        public string Get()
        {
            return "simple get";
        }

        [Route("geta")]
        public string GetA()
        {
            return "A";
        }

        [Route("getb")]
        public string GetB()
        {
            return "B";
        }
   }

See here for more details - http://nodogmablog.bryanhogan.net/2016/10/web-api-2-controller-with-multiple-get-methods/

7

In ASP.NET Core 2.0 you can add Route attribute to the controller:

[Route("api/[controller]/[action]")]
public class SomeController : Controller
{
    public SomeValue GetItems(CustomParam parameter) { ... }

    public SomeValue GetChildItems(CustomParam parameter, SomeObject parent) { ... }
}
5

The lazy/hurry alternative (Dotnet Core 2.2):

[HttpGet("method1-{item}")]
public string Method1(var item) { 
return "hello" + item;}

[HttpGet("method2-{item}")]
public string Method2(var item) { 
return "world" + item;}

Calling them :

localhost:5000/api/controllername/method1-42

"hello42"

localhost:5000/api/controllername/method2-99

"world99"

4

I was trying to use Web Api 2 attribute routing to allow for multiple Get methods, and I had incorporated the helpful suggestions from previous answers, but in the Controller I had only decorated the "special" method (example):

[Route( "special/{id}" )]
public IHttpActionResult GetSomethingSpecial( string id ) {

...without also also placing a [RoutePrefix] at the top of the Controller:

[RoutePrefix("api/values")]
public class ValuesController : ApiController

I was getting errors stating that no Route was found matching the submitted URI. Once I had both the [Route] decorating the method as well as [RoutePrefix] decorating the Controller as a whole, it worked.

4

By default [Route("api/[controller]") will generated by .Net Core/Asp.Net Web API.You need to modify little bit,just add [Action] like [Route("api/[controller]/[action]")]. I have mentioned a dummy solution:

// Default generated controller
//
[Route("api/[controller]")
public class myApiController : Controller
{
    [HttpGet]
    public string GetInfo()
    {
        return "Information";
    }
}

//
//A little change would do the magic
//

[Route("api/[controller]/[action]")]
public class ServicesController : Controller
{
    [HttpGet]
    [ActionName("Get01")]
    public string Get01()
    {
        return "GET 1";
    }

    [HttpGet]
    [ActionName("Get02")]
    public string Get02()
    {
        return "Get 2";
    }
    
    [HttpPost]
    [ActionName("Post01")]
    public HttpResponseMessage Post01(MyCustomModel01 model)
    {
        if (!ModelState.IsValid)
            return Request.CreateErrorResponse(HttpStatusCode.BadRequest, ModelState);
        
        //.. DO Something ..
        return Request.CreateResonse(HttpStatusCode.OK, "Optional Message");
    }
    
    [HttpPost]
    [ActionName("Post02")]
    public HttpResponseMessage Post02(MyCustomModel02 model)
    {
        if (!ModelState.IsValid)
            return Request.CreateErrorResponse(HttpStatusCode.BadRequest, ModelState);
        
        //.. DO Something ..
        return Request.CreateResonse(HttpStatusCode.OK, "Optional Message");
    }


}
3

I am not sure if u have found the answer, but I did this and it works

public IEnumerable<string> Get()
{
    return new string[] { "value1", "value2" };
}

// GET /api/values/5
public string Get(int id)
{
    return "value";
}

// GET /api/values/5
[HttpGet]
public string GetByFamily()
{
    return "Family value";
}

Now in global.asx

routes.IgnoreRoute("{resource}.axd/{*pathInfo}");

routes.MapHttpRoute(
    name: "DefaultApi2",
    routeTemplate: "api/{controller}/{action}",
    defaults: new { id = RouteParameter.Optional }
);

routes.MapHttpRoute(
    name: "DefaultApi",
    routeTemplate: "api/{controller}/{id}",
    defaults: new { id = RouteParameter.Optional }
);

routes.MapRoute(
    name: "Default",
    url: "{controller}/{action}/{id}",
    defaults: new { controller = "Home", action = "Index", id = UrlParameter.Optional }
);
3

Have you tried switching over to WebInvokeAttribute and setting the Method to "GET"?

I believe I had a similar problem and switched to explicitly telling which Method (GET/PUT/POST/DELETE) is expected on most, if not all, my methods.

public class SomeController : ApiController
{
    [WebInvoke(UriTemplate = "{itemSource}/Items"), Method="GET"]
    public SomeValue GetItems(CustomParam parameter) { ... }

    [WebInvoke(UriTemplate = "{itemSource}/Items/{parent}", Method = "GET")]
    public SomeValue GetChildItems(CustomParam parameter, SomeObject parent) { ... }
}

The WebGet should handle it but I've seen it have some issues with multiple Get much less multiple Get of the same return type.

[Edit: none of this is valid with the sunset of WCF WebAPI and the migration to ASP.Net WebAPI on the MVC stack]

1
  • 1
    I am sorry, I forgot to mention that I am moving the code to ASP.NET Web API since WCF Web API was discontinued. I edited the post. Thank you.
    – paulius_l
    Feb 29, 2012 at 16:25
3
**Add Route function to direct the routine what you want**
    public class SomeController : ApiController
    {
        [HttpGet()]
        [Route("GetItems")]
        public SomeValue GetItems(CustomParam parameter) { ... }

        [HttpGet()]
        [Route("GetChildItems")]
        public SomeValue GetChildItems(CustomParam parameter, SomeObject parent) { ... }
    }
2
  • Welcome to Stack Overflow! Please edit your answer to include an explanation for your code, as well as a description of how it is different from the fourteen other answers here. This question is almost eight years old, and already has an accepted and several well-explained answers. Without an explanation on yours, it will likely get downvoted or removed. Having that explanation will help justify your answer's place on this question.
    – Das_Geek
    Dec 11, 2019 at 21:40
  • 1
    Personally (I know what SOs recommendations are) for a question this clear/basic I would personally much rather have a pure code answer. I don't want to read lots of explanation I want to make helpful functional software fast. +1 May 6, 2020 at 20:12
1

Specifying the base path in the [Route] attribute and then adding to the base path in the [HttpGet] worked for me. You can try:

    [Route("api/TestApi")]      //this will be the base path
    public class TestController : ApiController
    {
        [HttpGet]  //example call: 'api/TestApi'
        public string Get()
        {
            return string.Empty;
        }
    
        [HttpGet("{id}")]  //example call: 'api/TestApi/4'
        public string GetById(int id) //method name won't matter
        {
            return string.Empty;
        }
    
        //....

Took me a while to figure since I didn't want to use [Route] multiple times.

2
  • 1
    This method won't work if you have multiple HttpGet methods with the same signature.
    – Jason D
    Feb 19, 2021 at 13:22
  • @JasonD is correct. What if you want to search a string, as well as keeping the ID reference?
    – Fandango68
    Apr 12 at 23:47
0

None of the above examples worked for my personal needs. The below is what I ended up doing.

 public class ContainsConstraint : IHttpRouteConstraint
{       
    public string[] array { get; set; }
    public bool match { get; set; }

    /// <summary>
    /// Check if param contains any of values listed in array.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="param">The param to test.</param>
    /// <param name="array">The items to compare against.</param>
    /// <param name="match">Whether we are matching or NOT matching.</param>
    public ContainsConstraint(string[] array, bool match)
    {

        this.array = array;
        this.match = match;
    }

    public bool Match(System.Net.Http.HttpRequestMessage request, IHttpRoute route, string parameterName, IDictionary<string, object> values, HttpRouteDirection routeDirection)
    {
        if (values == null) // shouldn't ever hit this.                   
            return true;

        if (!values.ContainsKey(parameterName)) // make sure the parameter is there.
            return true;

        if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(values[parameterName].ToString())) // if the param key is empty in this case "action" add the method so it doesn't hit other methods like "GetStatus"
            values[parameterName] = request.Method.ToString();

        bool contains = array.Contains(values[parameterName]); // this is an extension but all we are doing here is check if string array contains value you can create exten like this or use LINQ or whatever u like.

        if (contains == match) // checking if we want it to match or we don't want it to match
            return true;
        return false;             

    }

To use the above in your route use:

config.Routes.MapHttpRoute("Default", "{controller}/{action}/{id}", new { action = RouteParameter.Optional, id = RouteParameter.Optional}, new { action = new ContainsConstraint( new string[] { "GET", "PUT", "DELETE", "POST" }, true) });

What happens is the constraint kind of fakes in the method so that this route will only match the default GET, POST, PUT and DELETE methods. The "true" there says we want to check for a match of the items in array. If it were false you'd be saying exclude those in the strYou can then use routes above this default method like:

config.Routes.MapHttpRoute("GetStatus", "{controller}/status/{status}", new { action = "GetStatus" });

In the above it is essentially looking for the following URL => http://www.domain.com/Account/Status/Active or something like that.

Beyond the above I'm not sure I'd get too crazy. At the end of the day it should be per resource. But I do see a need to map friendly urls for various reasons. I'm feeling pretty certain as Web Api evolves there will be some sort of provision. If time I'll build a more permanent solution and post.

1
  • You can use new System.Web.Http.Routing.HttpMethodConstraint(HttpMethod.Get, HttpMethod.Post, HttpMethod.Put, HttpMethod.Delete) instead. Jan 25, 2014 at 6:09
0

Couldn't make any of the above routing solutions work -- some of the syntax seems to have changed and I'm still new to MVC -- in a pinch though I put together this really awful (and simple) hack which will get me by for now -- note, this replaces the "public MyObject GetMyObjects(long id)" method -- we change "id"'s type to a string, and change the return type to object.

// GET api/MyObjects/5
// GET api/MyObjects/function
public object GetMyObjects(string id)
{
    id = (id ?? "").Trim();

    // Check to see if "id" is equal to a "command" we support
    // and return alternate data.

    if (string.Equals(id, "count", StringComparison.OrdinalIgnoreCase))
    {
        return db.MyObjects.LongCount();
    }

    // We now return you back to your regularly scheduled
    // web service handler (more or less)

    var myObject = db.MyObjects.Find(long.Parse(id));
    if (myObject == null)
    {
        throw new HttpResponseException
        (
            Request.CreateResponse(HttpStatusCode.NotFound)
        );
    }

    return myObject;
}
0

If you have multiple Action within same file then pass the same argument e.g. Id to all Action. This is because action only can identify Id, So instead of giving any name to argument only declare Id like this.


[httpget]
[ActionName("firstAction")] firstAction(string Id)
{.....
.....
}
[httpget]
[ActionName("secondAction")] secondAction(Int Id)
{.....
.....
}
//Now go to webroute.config file under App-start folder and add following
routes.MapHttpRoute(
name: "firstAction",
routeTemplate: "api/{controller}/{action}/{id}",
defaults: new { id = RouteParameter.Optional }
);

routes.MapHttpRoute(
name: "secondAction",
routeTemplate: "api/{controller}/{action}/{id}",
defaults: new { id = RouteParameter.Optional }
);
1
  • How would the Url look like to view each function in the browser?
    – Si8
    Jan 20, 2017 at 15:24
0

Simple Alternative

Just use a query string.

Routing

config.Routes.MapHttpRoute(
    name: "DefaultApi",
    routeTemplate: "api/{controller}/{id}",
    defaults: new { id = RouteParameter.Optional }
);

Controller

public class TestController : ApiController
{
    public IEnumerable<SomeViewModel> Get()
    {
    }

    public SomeViewModel GetById(int objectId)
    {
    }
}

Requests

GET /Test
GET /Test?objectId=1

Note

Keep in mind that the query string param should not be "id" or whatever the parameter is in the configured route.

1
  • As explained above, this only works for one data type - INT. What if you want to add now a lookup using a string such as a name like GetByName()?
    – Fandango68
    Apr 12 at 23:50
0

The concept of multiple methods in a single asp.net web api controller makes it easier to have more than 1 method in code.

I was able to implement following the steps in the above solutions and came up with this final code

In the WebApiConfig.cs ,set up the following Route config, in this order

 public static class WebApiConfig
    {
        public static void Register(HttpConfiguration config)
        {
            // Web API configuration and services

            // Web API routes
            config.Routes.MapHttpRoute(
                name: "DefaultApiAction",
                routeTemplate: "api/{controller}/{action}/{id}",
                defaults: new { id = RouteParameter.Optional }
            );

            config.Routes.MapHttpRoute(
                name: "DefaultApi",
                routeTemplate: "api/{controller}/{id}",
                defaults: new { id = RouteParameter.Optional }
            );

            config.MapHttpAttributeRoutes();


        }
    }

Then in your controller reference the [HttpGet] for GET or [HttpPost] for POST with [ActionName] see sample code below

namespace WebRESTApi.Controllers
{
    //[RoutePrefix("api/Test")]
    public class TestController : ApiController
    {

 

        [HttpGet]
        [ActionName("AllEmailWithDisplayname")]
        public string AllEmailWithDisplayname()
        {
          
            return "values";
        }


 

        [HttpPost]
        [ActionName("Authenticate")]
        // POST: api/Authenticate
        public object Authenticate([FromBody()] object Loginvalues)
        {
 
                return true;
        
        }


        [HttpPost]
        [ActionName("ShowCredential")]
        // POST:  api/Showcredential
        public object Showcredential([FromBody()] object Loginvalues)
        {

            
            return "Username: " 


        }



    }
}

you can then consume the different methods via client or postman using the format

http://url/api/controller/actionname

-1

Modify the WebApiConfig and add at the end another Routes.MapHttpRoute like this:

config.Routes.MapHttpRoute(
                name: "ServiceApi",
                routeTemplate: "api/Service/{action}/{id}",
                defaults: new { id = RouteParameter.Optional }
            );

Then create a controller like this:

public class ServiceController : ApiController
{
        [HttpGet]
        public string Get(int id)
        {
            return "object of id id";
        }
        [HttpGet]
        public IQueryable<DropDownModel> DropDowEmpresa()
        {
            return db.Empresa.Where(x => x.Activo == true).Select(y =>
                  new DropDownModel
                  {
                      Id = y.Id,
                      Value = y.Nombre,
                  });
        }

        [HttpGet]
        public IQueryable<DropDownModel> DropDowTipoContacto()
        {
            return db.TipoContacto.Select(y =>
                  new DropDownModel
                  {
                      Id = y.Id,
                      Value = y.Nombre,
                  });
        }

        [HttpGet]
        public string FindProductsByName()
        {
            return "FindProductsByName";
        }
}

This is how I solved it. I hope it will help someone.

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