5281

Is there something in JavaScript similar to @import in CSS that allows you to include a JavaScript file inside another JavaScript file?

61 Answers 61

9

I have created a function that will allow you to use similar verbiage to C#/Java to include a JavaScript file. I've tested it a little bit even from inside of another JavaScript file and it seems to work. It does require jQuery though for a bit of "magic" at the end.

I put this code in a file at the root of my script directory (I named it global.js, but you can use whatever you want. Unless I'm mistaken this and jQuery should be the only required scripts on a given page. Keep in mind this is largely untested beyond some basic usage, so there may or may not be any issues with the way I've done it; use at your own risk yadda yadda I am not responsible if you screw anything up yadda yadda:

/**
* @fileoverview This file stores global functions that are required by other libraries.
*/

if (typeof(jQuery) === 'undefined') {
    throw 'jQuery is required.';
}

/** Defines the base script directory that all .js files are assumed to be organized under. */
var BASE_DIR = 'js/';

/**
* Loads the specified file, outputting it to the <head> HTMLElement.
*
* This method mimics the use of using in C# or import in Java, allowing
* JavaScript files to "load" other JavaScript files that they depend on
* using a familiar syntax.
*
* This method assumes all scripts are under a directory at the root and will
* append the .js file extension automatically.
*
* @param {string} file A file path to load using C#/Java "dot" syntax.
*
* Example Usage:
* imports('core.utils.extensions');
* This will output: <script type="text/javascript" src="/js/core/utils/extensions.js"></script>
*/
function imports(file) {
    var fileName = file.substr(file.lastIndexOf('.') + 1, file.length);

    // Convert PascalCase name to underscore_separated_name
    var regex = new RegExp(/([A-Z])/g);
    if (regex.test(fileName)) {
        var separated = fileName.replace(regex, ",$1").replace(',', '');
        fileName = separated.replace(/[,]/g, '_');
    }

    // Remove the original JavaScript file name to replace with underscore version
    file = file.substr(0, file.lastIndexOf('.'));

    // Convert the dot syntax to directory syntax to actually load the file
    if (file.indexOf('.') > 0) {
        file = file.replace(/[.]/g, '/');
    }

    var src = BASE_DIR + file + '/' + fileName.toLowerCase() + '.js';
    var script = document.createElement('script');
    script.type = 'text/javascript';
    script.src = src;

    $('head').find('script:last').append(script);
}
| improve this answer | |
9

Keep it nice, short, simple, and maintainable! :]

// 3rd party plugins / script (don't forget the full path is necessary)
var FULL_PATH = '', s =
[
    FULL_PATH + 'plugins/script.js'      // Script example
    FULL_PATH + 'plugins/jquery.1.2.js', // jQuery Library 
    FULL_PATH + 'plugins/crypto-js/hmac-sha1.js',      // CryptoJS
    FULL_PATH + 'plugins/crypto-js/enc-base64-min.js'  // CryptoJS
];

function load(url)
{
    var ajax = new XMLHttpRequest();
    ajax.open('GET', url, false);
    ajax.onreadystatechange = function ()
    {
        var script = ajax.response || ajax.responseText;
        if (ajax.readyState === 4)
        {
            switch(ajax.status)
            {
                case 200:
                    eval.apply( window, [script] );
                    console.log("library loaded: ", url);
                    break;
                default:
                    console.log("ERROR: library not loaded: ", url);
            }
        }
    };
    ajax.send(null);
}

 // initialize a single load 
load('plugins/script.js');

// initialize a full load of scripts
if (s.length > 0)
{
    for (i = 0; i < s.length; i++)
    {
        load(s[i]);
    }
}

This code is simply a short functional example that could require additional feature functionality for full support on any (or given) platform.

| improve this answer | |
9

For NodeJS only, This worked for me the best!

I've tried most solutions here, but none helped me about just being able to load another file without changing scope. Finally I used this. Which preserves the scope and everything. It is as good as your code is in that point.

const fs = require('fs');
eval(fs.readFileSync('file.js')+'');
| improve this answer | |
9

Here's a workaround for browsers (not Node.js) using HTML imports.

First, all JavaScript classes and scripts are not in .js files, but in .js.html files (the .js.html is just to recognize between HTML pages and complete JavaScript script/classes), inside <script> tags, like this:

MyClass.js.html:

<script>
   class MyClass {

      // Your code here..

   }

</script>

Then if you wish to import your class, you just need to use HTML imports:

<link rel="import" href="relative/path/to/MyClass.js.html"/>

<script>
   var myClass = new MyClass();
   // Your code here..
</script>

EDIT : HTML imports will be dropped

HTML imports are dropped, in favor of ES6 modules. You should use ES6 modules.

| improve this answer | |
8

I basically do it like the following, creating a new element and attach that to head:

var x = document.createElement('script');
x.src = 'http://example.com/test.js';
document.getElementsByTagName("head")[0].appendChild(x);

In jQuery:

// jQuery
$.getScript('/path/to/imported/script.js', function()
{
    // Script is now loaded and executed.
    // Put your dependent JavaScript code here.
});
| improve this answer | |
8

ES6 Modules

YES, use type="module" in script tag (support)

<script type="module" src="script.js"></script>

And in script.js file include another file like that:

import { hello } from './module.js';
...
// alert(hello());

In 'module.js' you must export function/class that you will import

export function hello() {
    return "Hello World";
}

Working example here.

| improve this answer | |
7

Better use the jQuery way. To delay the ready event, first call $.holdReady(true). Example (source):

$.holdReady(true);
$.getScript("myplugin.js", function() {
    $.holdReady(false);
});
| improve this answer | |
7

Here is a Grunt plugin allowing you to use @import "path/to/file.js"; syntax in any file including JavaScript files. It can be paired with uglify or watch or any other plugin.

It can be installed with npm install: https://npmjs.org/package/grunt-import

| improve this answer | |
7

Yes, there is...

Keep reading, in ES6, we can export and import part or whole javascript file into another one...

But wait, ES6 is not supported in all the browsers, so what you need is transpile it using babel.js for example...

So you create a class like below:

class Person {
  constructor(name) {
    this.name = name;
  }

  build() {
    return new Person(this);
  }
}

module.exports = Person;

in Another JavaScript file, do the import like:

import { Person } from 'Person';

You also can require the file like:

const Person = require('./Person');

If you are using older JavaScript version you can use requirejs:

requirejs(["helper/util"], function(util) {
    //This function is called when scripts/helper/util.js is loaded.
    //If util.js calls define(), then this function is not fired until
    //util's dependencies have loaded, and the util argument will hold
    //the module value for "helper/util".
});

If you want to stick to older version of stuffs, like jQuery, you can also use something like getScript:

jQuery.getScript('./another-script.js', function() {
    // Call back after another-script loaded
});

Last but not the least, don't forget you can do the traditional way of putting script together using <script> tag...

<script src="./first-script.js"></script>
<script src="./second-script.js"></script>
<script src="./third-script.js"></script>

There are also async and defer attribute which I should mention them here...

Note: There are several ways an external script can be executed:

  • If async is present: The script is executed asynchronously with the rest of the page (the script will be executed while the page continues the parsing)
  • If async is not present and defer is present: The script is executed when the page has finished parsing
  • If neither async or defer is present: The script is fetched and executed immediately, before the browser continues parsing the page
| improve this answer | |
6

In a past project I had quite a bit of success using ajile to do imports of reusable JavaScript files. I always wished there was a feature for this built into JavaScript itself.

| improve this answer | |
6

I have the requirement to asynchronously load an array of JavaScript files and at the final make a callback. Basically my best approach is the following:

// Load a JavaScript file from other JavaScript file
function loadScript(urlPack, callback) {
    var url = urlPack.shift();
    var subCallback;

    if (urlPack.length == 0) subCallback = callback;
    else subCallback = function () {
        console.log("Log script: " + new Date().getTime());
        loadScript(urlPack, callback);
    }

    // Adding the script tag to the head as suggested before
    var head = document.getElementsByTagName('head')[0];
    var script = document.createElement('script');
    script.type = 'text/javascript';
    script.src = url;

    // Then bind the event to the callback function.
    // There are several events for cross browser compatibility.
    script.onreadystatechange = subCallback;
    script.onload = subCallback;

    // Fire the loading
    head.appendChild(script);
}

Example:

loadScript(
[
    "js/DataTable/jquery.dataTables.js",
    "js/DataTable/dataTables.bootstrap.js",
    "js/DataTable/dataTables.buttons.min.js",
    "js/DataTable/dataTables.colReorder.min.js",
    "js/DataTable/dataTables.fixedHeader.min.js",
    "js/DataTable/buttons.bootstrap.min.js",
    "js/DataTable/buttons.colVis.min.js",
    "js/DataTable/buttons.html5.min.js"
], function() { gpLoad(params); });

The second script will not load until the first is completely loaded, and so...

Results:

Result

| improve this answer | |
6

If you use Angular, then a plugin module $ocLazyLoad can help you to do that.

Here are some quotes from its documentation:

Load one or more modules & components with multiple files:

$ocLazyLoad.load(['testModule.js', 'testModuleCtrl.js', 'testModuleService.js']);

Load one or more modules with multiple files and specify a type where necessary: Note: When using the requireJS style formatting (with js! at the beginning for example), do not specify a file extension. Use one or the other.

$ocLazyLoad.load([
  'testModule.js',
   {type: 'css', path: 'testModuleCtrl'},
   {type: 'html', path: 'testModuleCtrl.html'},
   {type: 'js', path: 'testModuleCtrl'},
   'js!testModuleService',
   'less!testModuleLessFile'
]);

You can load external libs (not angular):

$ocLazyLoad.load(['testModule.js', 
   'bower_components/bootstrap/dist/js/bootstrap.js', 'anotherModule.js']);

You can also load css and template files:

 $ocLazyLoad.load([
     'bower_components/bootstrap/dist/js/bootstrap.js',
     'bower_components/bootstrap/dist/css/bootstrap.css',
     'partials/template1.html'
 ]);
| improve this answer | |
6

Import and export modules using ES6 that work with Node.js

Name files with .mjs extension instead of .js

Create files

touch main.mjs lib.mjs

main.js

import { add } from './lib.mjs';
console.log(add(40, 2));

lib.mjs

export let add = (x,y) => {
  return x + y
}

Run

node --experimental-modules main.js
| improve this answer | |
5

Don't forget to check out LAB.js!

<script type="text/javascript">
       $LAB
       .script("jquery-1.8.3.js").wait()
       .script("scripts/clientscript.js");      
</script>
| improve this answer | |
5
var s=["Hscript.js","checkRobert.js","Hscript.js"];
for(i=0;i<s.length;i++){
  var script=document.createElement("script");
  script.type="text/javascript";
  script.src=s[i];
  document.getElementsByTagName("head")[0].appendChild(script)
};
| improve this answer | |
5

Now, I may be totally misguided, but here's what I've recently started doing... Start and end your JavaScript files with a carriage return, place in the PHP script, followed by one more carriage return. The JavaScript comment "//" is ignored by PHP so the inclusion happens anyway. The purpose for the carriage returns is so that the first line of your included JavaScript isn't commented out.

Technically, you don't need the comment, but it posts errors in Dreamweaver that annoy me. If you're scripting in an IDE that doesn't post errors, you shouldn't need the comment or the carriage returns.

\n
//<?php require_once("path/to/javascript/dependency.js"); ?>

function myFunction(){
    // stuff
}
\n
| improve this answer | |
5

It's very simple. Suppose you want to import file A.js in file B.js.

Now it's sure you have linked B.js in an HTML file, then just link A.js before B.js in that HTML file. Then the public variables of A.js will be available inside the B.js

This does not require a complicated answer.

| improve this answer | |
5

I tried this problem with another approach,

Ordering of script importing, has no effect in here.

index.html

<!doctype html>
<html lang="en">
<head>
    <meta charset="utf-8">
    <title>Trials</title>
    <meta name="viewport" content="width=device-width, initial-scale=1">
    <script src="main.js"></script>
    <script src="scriptA.js"></script>
</head>

<body>
<h3>testing js in js (check console logs)</h3>
<button onclick="fnClick()">TEST</button>
</body>

</html>

main.js

function fnClick() {
  console.log('From\tAAAAA');
  var pro = myExpo.hello();
  console.log(pro);
}

scriptA.js

myExpo = {
    hello: function () {
        console.log('From\tBBBBB');
        return "Hello";
    }
}

and the result is

From    AAAAA
From    BBBBB
Hello
| improve this answer | |
4

Here is maybe another way!

In Node.js you can do that just like the following code shows!

sub.js

    module.exports = {
      log: function(string) {
        if(console) console.log(string);
      }
      mylog: function(){
        console.log('just for log test!');
      }
    }

main.js

    var mylog =require('./sub');

    mylog.log('Hurray, it works! :)');
    mylog.mylog();

refs

http://requirejs.org/docs/node.html

| improve this answer | |
3

You can't import, but you can reference.

PhpShtorm IDE. To reference, in one .js file to another .js, just add this to the top of the file:

<reference path="../js/file.js" />

Of course, you should use your own PATH to the JavaScript file.

I don't know if it will work in other IDEs. Probably yes, just try. It should work in Visual Studio too.

| improve this answer | |
3

Another approach is to use HTML imports. These can contain script references as well as stylesheet references.

You can just link an HTML file like

<link rel="import" href="vendorScripts.html"/>

Within the vendorScripts.html file you can include your script references like:

<script src="scripts/vendors/jquery.js"></script>
<script src="scripts/vendors/bootstrap.js"></script>
<script src="scripts/vendors/angular.js"></script>
<script src="scripts/vendors/angular-route.js"></script>

Look at HTML Imports for more details.

Unfortunately this only works in Chrome.

| improve this answer | |
2

Dynamically Loading Multiple Scripts In Order

The above function works fine if you are loading only one script or you don't care about the loading order of multiple scripts. If you have some scripts that depends on others, you need to use Promise to specify the order of loading. The reason behind this is Javascript loads resources like scripts and images asynchronously. The loading sequence does not depends on the sequence of asynchronous calls, meaning script1 will not be guaranteed to load before script2 even if you call dynamicallyLoadScript("scrip1") before calling dynamicallyLoadScript("scrip2")

So here's another version of dynamicallyLoadScript that guarantees loading order:

// Based on: https://javascript.info/promise-basics#example-loadscript
function dynamicallyLoadScript(url) {
        return new Promise(function(resolve, reject) {
        var script = document.createElement("script");
        script.src = url;
        script.onload = resolve;
        script.onerror = () => reject(new Error(`Error when loading ${url}!`));
        document.body.appendChild(script);
    });

For more on Promises, see this excellent page.

The usage of this new dynamicallyLoadScript is very simple:

dynamicallyLoadScript("script1.js")
.then(() => dynamicallyLoadScript("script2.js"))
.then(() => dynamicallyLoadScript("script3.js"))
.then(() => dynamicallyLoadScript("script4.js"))
.then(() => dynamicallyLoadScript("script5.js"))
//...

Now the scripts are loaded in the order of script1.js, script2.js, script3.js, etc.

Run dependent code after script loads

In addition, you can immediately run code that uses the scripts after they are loaded. Just add another .then after the loading the script:

dynamicallyLoadScript("script1.js")
.then(() => dynamicallyLoadScript("script2.js"))
.then(() => foo()) // foo can be a function defined in either script1, script2
.then(() => dynamicallyLoadScript("script3.js"))
.then(() => {
     if (var1){ // var1 can be a global variable defined in either script1, script2, or script3
          bar(var1); // bar can be a function defined in either script1, script2, or script3
     } else {
          foo(var1);
     }
})
//more .then chains...

Handle loading errors

To display unhandled promise rejections (errors loading scripts, etc), put this unhandledrejection event listener at the top of your code:

// Based on: https://javascript.info/promise-error-handling#unhandled-rejections
window.addEventListener('unhandledrejection', function(event) {
     // the event object has two special properties:
     console.error(event.promise);// the promise that generated the error
     console.error(event.reason); // the unhandled error object
});

Now you will be notified of any script loading errors.


Shortcut Function

If you are loading a lot of scripts without executing code immediately after loading, this shorthand function may come in handy:

function dynamicallyLoadScripts(urls){
        if (urls.length === 0){
            return;
        }
        let promise = dynamicallyLoadScript(urls[0]);
        urls.slice(1).forEach(url => {
            promise = promise.then(() => dynamicallyLoadScript(url));
        });
    }

To use it, just pass in an array of script urls like this:

const scriptURLs = ["dist/script1.js", "dist/script2.js", "dist/script3.js"];
dynamicallyLoadScripts(scriptURLs);

The scripts will be loaded in the order they appear in the array.

| improve this answer | |
2

Little Extend to lib from answer @Dan Dascalescu taken from facebook idea.

(function() {   
var __ = {};
this._ = function(name, callback) {
    if(__[name]==undefined) {
        __[name] = true;
        var firstScript = document.getElementsByTagName('script')[0],
          js = document.createElement('script');
          js.src =  name;
          js.onload = callback;
          firstScript.parentNode.insertBefore(js, firstScript);
    }
}
})();

(new _('https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/Snowstorm/20131208/snowstorm-min.js', function() {
 snowStorm.snowColor = '#99ccff';
}));
| improve this answer | |
1
var xxx = require("../lib/your-library.js")

or

import xxx from "../lib/your-library.js" //get default export
import {specificPart} from '../lib/your-library.js' //get named export
import * as _name from '../lib/your-library.js'  //get full export to alias _name
| improve this answer | |
1

Please note that we usually use static scripts. So we want to be taken from the cache as much as possible. This saves network traffic and speeds up landing.

Usage

$.cachedScript( "ajax/test.js" ).done(function( script, textStatus ) {
  console.log( textStatus );
});

cache: true option has been added to the ajax method

| improve this answer | |
1

If you find there are 2 or more scripts occupied the same function when they are called, then we cannot be included them in the same times, we need to do it dynamically by user selection.

Including another files in jQuery using $.getScript works since the script will not be cached by default. So we are save to call another scripts. The calls can be arranged like this:

HTML

<select class="choice">
  <option value="script1" selected>Script-1</option>
  <option value="script2">Script-2</option>
</select>

JS

  $(".choice").change(on_change);

    var url = "https://example.com";
    $.url1 = url + "/script1.js";
    $.url2 = url + "/script2.js";

  function on_change() {
    if ($(".choice").val()=="script1") {
        script1();
    } else {
        script2();
    }

    // script1
    function script1() {   
      $.getScript($.url1, function( data, textStatus, jqxhr ) {
          //excecute here
      });  
    }

    // script2
    function script2() {
       $.getScript($.url2, function( data, textStatus, jqxhr ) {
          //excecute here
      });  
    }
| improve this answer | |
1

You can use my loadScript ES module for loading of the javaScript files.

Usage:

In your head tag, include the following code:

<script src="https://raw.githack.com/anhr/loadScriptNodeJS/master/build/loadScript.js"></script>

or

<script src="https://raw.githack.com/anhr/loadScriptNodeJS/master/build/loadScript.min.js"></script>

Now you can use window.loadScript for loading of your JavaScript files.

loadScript.async( src, [options] )

Asynchronous load JavaScript file.

src: URL of an external script file or array of the script file names.

options: followed options is available

onload: function () The onload event occurs when a script has been loaded. Default is undefined.

onerror: function ( str, e ) The onerror event occurs when an error has been occured. Default is undefined.

    str: error details

    e: event

appendTo: The node to which the new script will be append. Default is head node.

For example

loadScript.async( "JavaScript.js",
        {
            onload: function () {

                var str = 'file has been loaded successfully';
                console.log( str );

            },
            onerror: function ( str, e ) {

                console.error( str );

            },

        } );

Example of usage

| improve this answer | |
1

So this is a edge case. But if you need to load the JavaScript from a remote source, most modern browsers might block your cross-site requests due to CORS or something similar. So normal

<script src="https://another-domain.com/example.js"></script>

Won't work. And doing the document.createElement('script').src = '...' won't cut it either. Instead, what you could do is load the java-script as a resource via standard GET request, and do this:

<script type="text/javascript">
    var script = document.createElement('script');
    script.type = 'text/javascript';

    let xhr = new XMLHttpRequest();
    xhr.open("GET", 'https://raw.githubusercontent.com/Torxed/slimWebSocket/master/slimWebSocket.js', true);
    xhr.onreadystatechange = function() {
        if (this.readyState === XMLHttpRequest.DONE && this.status === 200) {
            script.innerHTML = this.responseText; // <-- This one
            document.head.appendChild(script);
        }
    }
    xhr.send();
</script>

By grabbing the content yourself, the browser won't notice malicious intents and allow you go do the request. Then you add it in <script>'s innerHTML instead. This still causes the browser (at least tested in Chrome) to parse/execute the script.

Again, this is a edge case use case. And you'll have no backwards compatibility or browser compliance probably. But fun/useful thing to know about.

| improve this answer | |
0

I did not see an answer whereby you create an object of all functions and variables in a file and then make that object an argument to refer to it in another file.
E.g. you have files called 'jsMod.js', 'jsView' and 'jsContr.js'


    //jsMod.js file
    JSMODOBJ = {};
    JSMODOBJ.valueAddition = function(/* element value 1 */ val1, 
                                          /* element value 2 */ val2) {
        return val1 + val2;
    }


    //jsView.js file
    JSVIEWOBJ = {};
    JSVIEWOBJ.elementColour = function(/* element id to change colour */ id, 
                                          /* css colour classname */ col) {
        document.getElementById(id).className = col;
    }


    //jsContr.js file
    JSCONTROBJ = {};
    var jsMod = JSMODOBJ;
    var jsView = JSVIEWOBJ;

    JSCONTROBJ.changeColourByValue = function (val1, val2, id, clss) {
        if (jsMod.valueAddition(val1,val2) !== 0) {
            jsView.elementColour(id, clss);
        }
    }

Then you can set the js files dynamically by echoeing the scripts into your html or php file:

<?php
    echo "<script src = './js/dleafView.js'></script>
        <script src = './js/dleafModule.js'></script>
        <script src = './js/dleafContr.js'></script>";
?>

Then just call the control function within a <script type="text/javascript"></script> tag. Of course this will take alot of time in the beginning to set up, but save you time in the long run.
I use this in a slightly different way, but this way also works.

| improve this answer | |
0

You can also use gulp, gulp-concat, gulp-typescript with /// <reference path= includes:

packages.json

{
  "scripts": {
    "gulp": "gulp main"
  },
  "dependencies": {
    "@types/gulp": "^4.0.6",
    "@types/gulp-concat",
    "@types/gulp-typescript",
    "gulp": "^4.0.2",
    "gulp-concat": "^2.6.1",
    "gulp-resolve-dependencies": "^3.0.1",
    "gulp-typescript": "^6.0.0-alpha.1",
    "typescript": "^3.7.3"
  }
}

src/someimport.ts

class SomeClass {
    delay: number;
}

src/main.ts

/// <reference path="./someimport.ts" />

someclass = new SomeClass();
someclass.delay = 1;

This main gulp task (on gulpfile.js) targets only the src/main.js file, resolving all its /// <reference path=... include references. These includes are know as Triple-Slash Directives and they are used only for transpilers tools to combine files. In our case, they are used explicitly by .pipe(resolveDependencies({ and by typescript itself when checking the file for missing types, variables, etc.

  1. https://www.typescriptlang.org/docs/handbook/triple-slash-directives.html
  2. When do I need a triple slash reference?

Refer to https://github.com/ivogabe/gulp-typescript#api-overview if you would like to customize the var tsProject = ts.createProject call and not use a tsconfig.json file or override its parameters.

gulpfile.js

var gulp = require("gulp");
var concat = require('gulp-concat');
var resolveDependencies = require('gulp-resolve-dependencies');

var ts = require("gulp-typescript");
var tsProject = ts.createProject("tsconfig.json");

gulp.task("main", function() {
  return gulp
    .src(["src/main.ts"])
    .pipe(resolveDependencies({
      pattern: /^\s*\/\/\/\s*<\s*reference\s*path\s*=\s*(?:"|')([^'"\n]+)/gm
    }))
    .on('error', function(err) {
        console.log(err.message);
    })
    .pipe(tsProject())
    .pipe(concat('main.js'))
    .pipe(gulp.dest("build/"));
});

If you wold like to target all your type script project files instead of only src/main.ts, you can replace this:

  return gulp
    .src(["src/main.ts"])
    .pipe(resolveDependencies({
    ...
// -->
  return tsProject
    .src()
    .pipe(resolveDependencies({
    ...

If you do not want to use typescript, you can use this simplified gulpfile.js and remove all typescript includes from package.json:

gulpfile.js

var gulp = require("gulp");
var concat = require('gulp-concat');
var resolveDependencies = require('gulp-resolve-dependencies');

gulp.task("main", function() {
  return gulp
    .src(["src/main.js"])
    .pipe(resolveDependencies({
      pattern: /^\s*\/\/\/\s*<\s*reference\s*path\s*=\s*(?:"|')([^'"\n]+)/gm
    }))
    .on('error', function(err) {
        console.log(err.message);
    })
    .pipe(concat('main.js'))
    .pipe(gulp.dest("build/"));
});

packages.json

{
  "scripts": {
    "gulp": "gulp main"
  },
  "dependencies": {
    "gulp": "^4.0.2",
    "gulp-concat": "^2.6.1",
    "gulp-resolve-dependencies": "^3.0.1"
  }
}

Then, after running the command npm run gulp, the file build/main.js is created with the following as its contents:

build/main.js

class SomeClass {
}
/// <reference path="./someimport.ts" />
someclass = new SomeClass();
someclass.delay = 1;

Which allows me to include it in the browser with the script tag, after serving the build directory files:

<html>
    <head>
        <script src="main.js"></script>
    </head>
    <body>
        <script type="text/javascript">
            console.log(someclass.delay);
        </script>
    </body>
</html>

Related questions:

  1. https://www.typescriptlang.org/docs/handbook/gulp.html
  2. Can I use the typescript without requireJS?
  3. Gulp simple concatenation of main file that requires another JS file
  4. Client on node: Uncaught ReferenceError: require is not defined
  5. How can typescript browser node modules be compiled with gulp?
  6. Concatenate files using babel
  7. How to require CommonJS modules in the browser?
  8. Is there an alternative to Browserify?
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