19

How can we implement the system call using sysenter/syscall directly in x86 Linux? Can anybody provide help? It would be even better if you can also show the code for amd64 platform.

I know in x86, we can use

__asm__(
"               movl $1, %eax  \n"
"               movl $0, %ebx \n"
"               call *%gs:0x10 \n"
);

to route to sysenter indirectly.

But how can we code using sysenter/syscall directly to issue a system call?

I find some material http://damocles.blogbus.com/tag/sysenter/ . But still find it difficult to figure out.

32

I'm going to show you how to execute system calls by writing a program that writes Hello World! to standard output by using the write() system call. Here's the source of the program without an implementation of the actual system call :

#include <sys/types.h>

ssize_t my_write(int fd, const void *buf, size_t size);

int main(void)
{
    const char hello[] = "Hello world!\n";
    my_write(1, hello, sizeof(hello));
    return 0;
}

You can see that I named my custom system call function as my_write in order to avoid name clashes with the "normal" write, provided by libc. The rest of this answer contains the source of my_write for i386 and amd64.

i386

System calls in i386 Linux are implemented using the 128th interrupt vector, e.g. by calling int 0x80 in your assembly code, having set the parameters accordingly beforehand, of course. It is possible to do the same via SYSENTER, but actually executing this instruction is achieved by the VDSO virtually mapped to each running process. Since SYSENTER was never meant as a direct replacement of the int 0x80 API, it's never directly executed by userland applications - instead, when an application needs to access some kernel code, it calls the virtually mapped routine in the VDSO (that's what the call *%gs:0x10 in your code is for), which contains all the code supporting the SYSENTER instruction. There's quite a lot of it because of how the instruction actually works.

If you want to read more about this, have a look at this link. It contains a fairly brief overview of the techniques applied in the kernel and the VDSO.

#define __NR_write 4
ssize_t my_write(int fd, const void *buf, size_t size)
{
    ssize_t ret;
    asm volatile
    (
        "int $0x80"
        : "=a" (ret)
        : "0"(__NR_write), "b"(fd), "c"(buf), "d"(size)
        : "cc", "edi", "esi", "memory"
    );
    return ret;
}

As you can see, using the int 0x80 API is relatively simple. The number of the syscall goes to the eax register, while all the parameters needed for the syscall go into respectively ebx, ecx, edx, esi, edi, and ebp. System call numbers can be obtained by reading the file /usr/include/asm/unistd_32.h. Prototypes and descriptions of the functions are available in the 2nd section of the manual, so in this case write(2). Since the kernel is allowed to destroy practically any of the registers, I put all the remaining GPRs on the clobber list, as well as cc, since the eflags register is also likely to change. Keep in mind that the clobber list also contains the memory parameter, which means that the instruction listed in the instruction list references memory (via the buf parameter).

amd64

Things look very different on the AMD64 architecture, which sports a new instruction called SYSCALL. It is very different from the original SYSENTER instruction, and definitely much easier to use from userland applications - it really resembles a normal CALL, actually, and adapting the old int 0x80 to the new SYSCALL is pretty much trivial.

In this case, the number of the system call is still passed in the register rax, but the registers used to hold the arguments have severely changed, since now they should be used in the following order : rdi, rsi, rdx, r10, r8 and r9. The kernel is allowed to destroy content of registers rcx and r11 (they're used for saving some of the other registers by SYSCALL).

#define __NR_write 1
ssize_t my_write(int fd, const void *buf, size_t size)
{
    ssize_t ret;
    asm volatile
    (
        "syscall"
        : "=a" (ret)
        : "0"(__NR_write), "D"(fd), "S"(buf), "d"(size)
        : "cc", "rcx", "r11", "memory"
    );
    return ret;
}

Do notice how practically the only thing that needed changing were the register names, and the actual instruction used for making the call. This is mostly thanks to the input/output lists provided by gcc's extended inline assembly syntax, which automagically provides appropriate move instructions needed for executing the instruction list.

  • 2
    Thanks! It seems that it very unlikely for even weird programmer to directly code using sysenter to invoke a system calls. We are actually working on a binary (including malware) analyzer for listing all the system calls in a target program. That is why we want to collect all the ways a system call is issued. It seems that we can ignore this direct sysenter approach. – Infinite Mar 3 '12 at 1:23
  • 1
    Why is the first input argument is "0", shouldn't it be "a" as the system call number goes into eax/rax? – Calmarius Aug 11 '16 at 13:56
  • 2
    @Calmarius : the 0 here means "the first output argument". AFAIR (this was a long time ago), the particular version of gcc that I used to compile this for some reason rejected the - one would think - perfectly valid "a"(__NR_write) here. gcc 6.1.1 doesn't have a problem with that, so I guess you can use it. – Daniel Kamil Kozar Aug 11 '16 at 22:06
  • 2
    According to lxr.free-electrons.com/source/arch/x86/kernel/… , to need to specify "cc" (because eflags are saved) or "edi" or "esi" (because these registers are also saved) in the clobbers list. – pts Jan 26 '17 at 14:59
  • 2
    @CiroSantilli新疆改造中心六四事件法轮功: Why would it? The input is an int, which means the upper 32 bits of the register are unused by the asm. It would be a missed optimization if it wasted an instruction zero or sign-extending narrow inputs without asking for it. The system-call arg is declared as int, so you can safely count on the kernel to ignore such garbage, too. – Peter Cordes Mar 2 at 15:25
2

Explicit register variables

Just for completeness, I want to provide an example using GCC explicit register variables.

This mechanism has the following advantages:

Register variables are used for example in glibc 2.29, see: sysdeps/unix/sysv/linux/x86_64/sysdep.h.

Also note that other archs such as ARM have dropped the single letter mnemonics completely, and register variables are the only way to do it it seems, see for example: How to specify an individual register as constraint in ARM GCC inline assembly?

main_reg.c

#define _XOPEN_SOURCE 700
#include <inttypes.h>
#include <sys/types.h>

ssize_t my_write(int fd, const void *buf, size_t size) {
    register int64_t rax __asm__ ("rax") = 1;
    register int rdi __asm__ ("rdi") = fd;
    register const void *rsi __asm__ ("rsi") = buf;
    register size_t rdx __asm__ ("rdx") = size;
    __asm__ __volatile__ (
        "syscall"
        : "+r" (rax)
        : "r" (rdi), "r" (rsi), "r" (rdx)
        : "cc", "rcx", "r11", "memory"
    );
    return rax;
}

void my_exit(int exit_status) {
    register int64_t rax __asm__ ("rax") = 60;
    register int rdi __asm__ ("rdi") = exit_status;
    __asm__ __volatile__ (
        "syscall"
        : "+r" (rax)
        : "r" (rdi)
        : "cc", "rcx", "r11", "memory"
    );
}

void _start(void) {
    char msg[] = "hello world\n";
    my_exit(my_write(1, msg, sizeof(msg)) != sizeof(msg));
}

GitHub upstream.

Compile and run:

gcc -O3 -std=c99 -ggdb3 -ffreestanding -nostdlib -Wall -Werror \
  -pedantic -o main_reg.out main_reg.c
./main.out
echo $?

Output

hello world
0

For comparison, the following analogous to How to invoke a system call via sysenter in inline assembly? produces equivalent assembly:

main_constraint.c

#define _XOPEN_SOURCE 700
#include <inttypes.h>
#include <sys/types.h>

ssize_t my_write(int fd, const void *buf, size_t size) {
    ssize_t ret;
    __asm__ __volatile__ (
        "syscall"
        : "=a" (ret)
        : "0" (1), "D" (fd), "S" (buf), "d" (size)
        : "cc", "rcx", "r11", "memory"
    );
    return ret;
}

void my_exit(int exit_status) {
    ssize_t ret;
    __asm__ __volatile__ (
        "syscall"
        : "=a" (ret)
        : "0" (60), "D" (exit_status)
        : "cc", "rcx", "r11", "memory"
    );
}

void _start(void) {
    char msg[] = "hello world\n";
    my_exit(my_write(1, msg, sizeof(msg)) != sizeof(msg));
}

GitHub upstream.

Disassembly of both with:

objdump -d main_reg.out

is almost identical, here is the main_reg.c one:

Disassembly of section .text:

0000000000001000 <my_write>:
    1000:   b8 01 00 00 00          mov    $0x1,%eax
    1005:   0f 05                   syscall 
    1007:   c3                      retq   
    1008:   0f 1f 84 00 00 00 00    nopl   0x0(%rax,%rax,1)
    100f:   00 

0000000000001010 <my_exit>:
    1010:   b8 3c 00 00 00          mov    $0x3c,%eax
    1015:   0f 05                   syscall 
    1017:   c3                      retq   
    1018:   0f 1f 84 00 00 00 00    nopl   0x0(%rax,%rax,1)
    101f:   00 

0000000000001020 <_start>:
    1020:   c6 44 24 ff 00          movb   $0x0,-0x1(%rsp)
    1025:   bf 01 00 00 00          mov    $0x1,%edi
    102a:   48 8d 74 24 f3          lea    -0xd(%rsp),%rsi
    102f:   48 b8 68 65 6c 6c 6f    movabs $0x6f77206f6c6c6568,%rax
    1036:   20 77 6f 
    1039:   48 89 44 24 f3          mov    %rax,-0xd(%rsp)
    103e:   ba 0d 00 00 00          mov    $0xd,%edx
    1043:   b8 01 00 00 00          mov    $0x1,%eax
    1048:   c7 44 24 fb 72 6c 64    movl   $0xa646c72,-0x5(%rsp)
    104f:   0a 
    1050:   0f 05                   syscall 
    1052:   31 ff                   xor    %edi,%edi
    1054:   48 83 f8 0d             cmp    $0xd,%rax
    1058:   b8 3c 00 00 00          mov    $0x3c,%eax
    105d:   40 0f 95 c7             setne  %dil
    1061:   0f 05                   syscall 
    1063:   c3                      retq   

So we see that GCC inlined those tiny syscall functions as would be desired.

my_write and my_exit are the same for both, but _start in main_constraint.c is slightly different:

0000000000001020 <_start>:
    1020:   c6 44 24 ff 00          movb   $0x0,-0x1(%rsp)
    1025:   48 8d 74 24 f3          lea    -0xd(%rsp),%rsi
    102a:   ba 0d 00 00 00          mov    $0xd,%edx
    102f:   48 b8 68 65 6c 6c 6f    movabs $0x6f77206f6c6c6568,%rax
    1036:   20 77 6f 
    1039:   48 89 44 24 f3          mov    %rax,-0xd(%rsp)
    103e:   b8 01 00 00 00          mov    $0x1,%eax
    1043:   c7 44 24 fb 72 6c 64    movl   $0xa646c72,-0x5(%rsp)
    104a:   0a 
    104b:   89 c7                   mov    %eax,%edi
    104d:   0f 05                   syscall 
    104f:   31 ff                   xor    %edi,%edi
    1051:   48 83 f8 0d             cmp    $0xd,%rax
    1055:   b8 3c 00 00 00          mov    $0x3c,%eax
    105a:   40 0f 95 c7             setne  %dil
    105e:   0f 05                   syscall 
    1060:   c3                      retq 

It is interesting to observe that in this case GCC found a slightly shorter equivalent encoding by picking:

    104b:   89 c7                   mov    %eax,%edi

to set the fd to 1, which equals the 1 from the syscall number, rather than a more direct:

    1025:   bf 01 00 00 00          mov    $0x1,%edi    

For an in-depth discussion of the calling conventions, see also: What are the calling conventions for UNIX & Linux system calls on i386 and x86-64

Tested in Ubuntu 18.10, GCC 8.2.0.

  • 1
    The casts are unnecessary. The system-call args that are declared as int will safely to ignore high garbage in the register in the kernel. And BTW, register asm is the only way to specify a specific one of r8..r15. – Peter Cordes Mar 2 at 15:28
  • @PeterCordes ah awesome, mentioned about r8 - r10. – Ciro Santilli 新疆改造中心法轮功六四事件 Mar 2 at 17:32

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