3300

Is there a better way to engineer a sleep in JavaScript than the following pausecomp function (taken from here)?

function pausecomp(millis)
{
    var date = new Date();
    var curDate = null;
    do { curDate = new Date(); }
    while(curDate-date < millis);
}

This is not a duplicate of Sleep in JavaScript - delay between actions; I want a real sleep in the middle of a function, and not a delay before a piece of code executes.

7
  • 237
    This is a horrible solution - you're going to be chewing up processing cycles while doing nothing.
    – 17 of 26
    Jun 4, 2009 at 14:47
  • 19
    The only purpose for a sleep is polling or waiting for a callback - setInterval and setTimeout do both better than this.
    – annakata
    Jun 4, 2009 at 14:50
  • 1
    Probably you can do what you want with continuation passing style in JavaScript. Take a look at this article. May 15, 2015 at 8:02
  • 40
    It is amazing to see people saying no without understanding what the OP wants. There are cases that you want a real sleep. I am now needing a real sleep to test the browsers behaviour of posting and receiving message between the top window and the iframe. Keeping it busy with while seems the only way. Jun 6, 2020 at 4:18
  • 8
    @DevsloveZenUML and designers and developers of browser environment decided for the sake of users that you shall NOT have your wish because giving someone explicit ability to block entire page in async application is insane. Jan 13 at 12:30

91 Answers 91

4430

2017 — 2021 update

Since 2009 when this question was asked, JavaScript has evolved significantly. All other answers are now obsolete or overly complicated. Here is the current best practice:

function sleep(ms) {
    return new Promise(resolve => setTimeout(resolve, ms));
}

Or as a one-liner:

await new Promise(r => setTimeout(r, 2000));

Or

const sleep = ms => new Promise(r => setTimeout(r, ms));

Use it as:

await sleep(<duration>);

Demo:

function sleep(ms) {
    return new Promise(resolve => setTimeout(resolve, ms));
}

async function demo() {
    for (let i = 0; i < 5; i++) {
        console.log(`Waiting ${i} seconds...`);
        await sleep(i * 1000);
    }
    console.log('Done');
}

demo();

Note that,

  1. await can only be executed in functions prefixed with the async keyword, or at the top level of your script in an increasing number of environments.
  2. await only pauses the current async function. This means it does not block the execution of the rest of the script, which is what you want in the vast majority of the cases. If you do want a blocking construct, see this answer using Atomics.wait, but note that most browsers will not allow it on the browser's main thread.

Two new JavaScript features (as of 2017) helped write this "sleep" function:

Compatibility

If for some reason you're using Node older than 7 (which reached end of life in 2017), or are targeting old browsers, async/await can still be used via Babel (a tool that will transpile JavaScript + new features into plain old JavaScript), with the transform-async-to-generator plugin.

23
  • 10
    Great stuff here. I wonder, how does this affects or relates with the modern browsers "active" / "inactive" states after JS calls the "sleep" mode? Can the browser block the sleep as expected for general JS, to recall later when becomes "active", or does it have a different behavior? Oct 12, 2016 at 2:16
  • 27
    What is the current browser support for this? I wouldn't consider the previous solutions to be "obsolete" until this solution is supported by the vast majority of browsers, or at least all of the common ones. On the contrary, I would consider this solution interesting but unusable/impractical until it has widespread support. Dec 27, 2016 at 17:56
  • 5
    @AlvinThompson: the majority of modern web development uses transpilers, so native browser support matters less than cleaner and more future-proof code. Anyway, see caniuse. Jan 8, 2017 at 10:31
  • 10
    @jacroe - the transpiler handles arrow functions as well as async/await (which would cause IE to vomit blood anyway) May 30, 2017 at 8:39
  • 9
    oneliner await new Promise(r => setTimeout(() => r(), 2000));
    – phil294
    Jan 17, 2018 at 18:54
863

(See the updated answer for 2016)

I think it's perfectly reasonable to want to perform an action, wait, and then perform another action. If you are used to writing in multi-threaded languages, you probably have the idea of yielding execution for a set amount of time until your thread wakes up.

The issue here is that JavaScript is a single-thread event-based model. While in a specific case, it might be nice to have the whole engine wait for a few seconds, in general it is bad practice. Suppose I wanted to make use of your functions while writing my own? When I called your method, my methods would all freeze up. If JavaScript could somehow preserve your function's execution context, store it somewhere, then bring it back and continue later, then sleep could happen, but that would basically be threading.

So you are pretty much stuck with what others have suggested -- you'll need to break your code up into multiple functions.

Your question is a bit of a false choice, then. There is no way to sleep in the way you want, nor should you pursue the solution you suggest.

5
  • 63
    This is not a correct answer at all. If Javascript does not have a sleep function, it is only because ECMAScript does not require it. It is a design choice by the body responsible for the design of Javascript. It could have been made that the Javascript run time waits a given amount of time before running the next line of code, but it was chosen not to.
    – Didier A.
    Aug 16, 2013 at 19:20
  • 5
    A sleep can be perfectly implemented in JavaScript allbeit not with real-time precision. After all it is an event based system. If async calls are completed an event is triggered. I see no reason why the same can't be possible when a sleep() is issued after which control is returned to the browser until the sleeping is over, returning control to the calling function. And yes, I also agree that sometimes sleeping is handy especially when developers BEFORE you screwed up the design so badly that YOU have no other way out besides completely refactoring for which you have no time
    – Lawrence
    Nov 14, 2013 at 12:40
  • Try Hypnotic, which follows this idea: coolwanglu.github.io/hypnotic/web/demo.html
    – Tezcat
    Dec 5, 2013 at 10:34
  • There is one situation where timeouts simply don't solve the problem, no matter how much you refactor: if you're running server-side, the client is waiting for the data, and you don't have direct access to the connection to pass it to the timeout callback. For instance, in meteor, you could be running in a method. In that case, you should consider using a future, as described here: stackoverflow.com/questions/12569712/… Aug 9, 2014 at 15:12
  • 13
    I agree why sleep() isn't possible in JS, and that most of the time there are better ways to do things. But I'd still consider the way the engine ties all things up to be a design flaw; there's no reason the language couldn't have a sleep() function limited to a specific script, page, or function without the engine clobbering the CPU and freezing the app like a maniac. It's 2015 and you shouldn't be able to crash an entire web browser with while(1). We have Flash for things like that.
    – Beejor
    Sep 12, 2015 at 5:10
757

In JavaScript, I rewrite every function so that it can end as soon as possible. You want the browser back in control so it can make your DOM changes.

Every time I've wanted a sleep in the middle of my function, I refactored to use a setTimeout().

Edit

The infamous sleep, or delay, function within any language is much debated. Some will say that there should always be a signal or callback to fire a given functionality, others will argue that sometimes an arbitrary moment of delay is useful. I say that to each their own and one rule can never dictate anything in this industry.

Writing a sleep function is simple and made even more usable with JavaScript Promises:

// sleep time expects milliseconds
function sleep (time) {
  return new Promise((resolve) => setTimeout(resolve, time));
}

// Usage!
sleep(500).then(() => {
    // Do something after the sleep!
});
24
  • 194
    By way of closure. function foobar(el) { setTimeout(function() { foobar_cont(el); }, 5000); }
    – chaos
    Apr 8, 2010 at 3:27
  • 74
    ok, and what if the code is not intended to be used in a webpage? Jul 22, 2010 at 15:23
  • 11
    @EugenioMiró if the code is not intended to be used in a webpage, have the host's object model implement a sleep method. -- I think the question is geared towards the DOM which is exposed to javascript running on web pages. Sep 24, 2011 at 0:57
  • 36
    @Nosredna yes, we understand how to make async calls, this doesn't help us sleep(). I want my calls to be made in a certain order, and to have the data back in a certain order. I'm 5 levels deep in a for loop. I want to BLOCK execution. A true sleep method would not "slow down the browser", sleep hands control back to the browser and any other threads that want CPU time while it is still blocking. Sep 24, 2011 at 0:59
  • 7
    @Tim loop-safe version: for(i=0; i<5; i++) { (function(i) { setTimeout(function() { console.log(i); }, 1000*i); })(i); }
    – sorki
    Dec 28, 2011 at 22:45
343

In Firebug (and probably other JavaScript consoles), nothing happen after hitting enter, only after the sleep duration specified (...)

function sleepFor(sleepDuration){
    var now = new Date().getTime();
    while(new Date().getTime() < now + sleepDuration){ /* Do nothing */ }
}

Example of use:

function sleepFor(sleepDuration){
    var now = new Date().getTime();
    while(new Date().getTime() < now + sleepDuration){ 
        /* Do nothing */ 
    }
}

function sleepThenAct(){
    sleepFor(2000);
    console.log("Hello, JavaScript sleep!");
}

sleepThenAct()

Note: Only for debugging and development

16
  • 49
    This is not an answer. It's exactly the same as the code in the question, except slightly shorter.
    – jab
    Jun 2, 2015 at 4:23
  • 28
    Busy waiting, really? In JS? For seconds? If I catch a website doing this, it will be blocked.
    – mafu
    Aug 19, 2016 at 12:27
  • 47
    @mafu That's why it says only for debug/dev... rolleyes
    – xDaizu
    Aug 29, 2016 at 10:31
  • 26
    NEVER DO THIS. This will make the CPU to hit 100% on the core that it executes and will block it.
    – eaorak
    Dec 18, 2017 at 10:51
  • 5
    This is useful, and perhaps the ONLY way to sleep, within a command-line javascript application, because async/await is not helpful.
    – Wheezil
    Jan 13, 2018 at 18:52
198

I agree with the other posters. A busy sleep is just a bad idea.

However, setTimeout does not hold up execution. It executes the next line of the function immediately after the timeout is SET, not after the timeout expires, so that does not accomplish the same task that a sleep would accomplish.

The way to do it is to breakdown your function into before and after parts.

function doStuff()
{
  // Do some things
  setTimeout(continueExecution, 10000) // Wait ten seconds before continuing
}

function continueExecution()
{
   // Finish doing things after the pause
}

Make sure your function names still accurately describe what each piece is doing (i.e., GatherInputThenWait and CheckInput, rather than funcPart1 and funcPart2)

This method achieves the purpose of not executing the lines of code you decide until after your timeout, while still returning control back to the client PC to execute whatever else it has queued up.

As pointed out in the comments this will absolutely not work in a loop. You could do some fancy (ugly) hacking to make it work in a loop, but in general that will just make for disastrous spaghetti code.

10
  • 12
    Yeah. Where this gets tricky is when you have a loop, or a nested loop even. You have to abandon your for loops and have counters instead.
    – Nosredna
    Jun 4, 2009 at 15:10
  • Touché. I mean, it would still be possible, but ugly and hackish in that case. You could also use some static boolean state variables, but that's also pretty hackish.
    – DevinB
    Jun 4, 2009 at 15:20
  • 3
    -1 for this. Again, this does not answer the question. This is more an answer for a question like "How to execute a function asynchronously" which is very much different from "How to block a code execution".
    – Deepak G M
    Jan 28, 2013 at 8:32
  • 6
    @Nosredna No, you'd use a closure. For example: function foo(index) { setTimeout(function() { foo_continue(index); }, 10000); } and for(var X = 0; X < 3;X++) { foo(X); } - the value of X is passed into foo, which then gets reused under the name index when foo_continue is eventually called.
    – Izkata
    Jan 13, 2014 at 19:34
  • 2
    @Alexander Of course it does, because the point of setTimeout() is to prevent the browser from locking up by running the code asychronously. Put the console.log() inside foo_continue() in the setTimeout version and you get the same result.
    – Izkata
    Mar 23, 2015 at 14:20
157

For the love of $DEITY please do not make a busy-wait sleep function. setTimeout and setInterval do everything you need.

var showHide = document.getElementById('showHide');
setInterval(() => {
    showHide.style.visibility = "initial";
    setTimeout(() => {
        showHide.style.visibility = "hidden"
    }, 1000);
    ;
}, 2000);   
<div id="showHide">Hello! Goodbye!</div>

Every two second interval hide text for one second. This shows how to use setInterval and setTimeout to show and hide text each second.

13
  • 4
    Well not quite everything: setInterval does a much better impression of polling.
    – annakata
    Jun 4, 2009 at 14:48
  • 20
    Unless you need the sleep to be synchronous, in which case this is a completely valid question. Sep 21, 2011 at 16:54
  • 51
    I think many of us might be forgetting that JavaScript isn't a browser-only language. This dude might be creating a Node command line utility that requires a brief pause without needing to deal with all the variable scoping issues that come with setTimeout. Mar 2, 2014 at 12:07
  • 4
    @PhilLaNasa: If syntactic closure is still scaring one, one seriously needs to buckle down and work through Node 101.
    – chaos
    Mar 3, 2014 at 16:47
  • 5
    @PhilLaNasa: Any context in which closures are not JS 101 needs a full curriculum redesign, stat.
    – chaos
    Mar 26, 2014 at 21:03
113

If (like me) you're using JavaScript with Rhino, you can use...

try
{
  java.lang.Thread.sleep(timeInMilliseconds);
}
catch (e)
{
  /*
   * This will happen if the sleep is woken up - you might want to check
   * if enough time has passed and sleep again if not - depending on how
   * important the sleep time is to you.
   */
}
1
  • 29
    @RousseauAlexandre Incorrect. It is JavaScript using Rhino (at the time, it could equally be Nashorn these days)
    – mjaggard
    Feb 1, 2018 at 20:42
73

If you're using jQuery, someone actually created a "delay" plugin that's nothing more than a wrapper for setTimeout:

// Delay Plugin for jQuery
// - http://www.evanbot.com
// - © 2008 Evan Byrne

jQuery.fn.delay = function(time,func){
    this.each(function(){
        setTimeout(func,time);
    });

    return this;
};

You can then just use it in a row of function calls as expected:

$('#warning')
.addClass('highlight')
.delay(1000)
.removeClass('highlight');
4
  • 4
    That's not a bad solution. Keeps context and chainability.
    – Nosredna
    Jun 10, 2009 at 19:00
  • 42
    As of jQuery 1.4, .delay() is part of jQuery (though with semantics different from the above implementation). api.jquery.com/delay
    – Matt Ball
    Oct 24, 2011 at 13:26
  • 11
    What this question was definitely lacking was a jQuery answer. So glad we got it!
    – xDaizu
    Aug 30, 2016 at 8:56
  • 1
    If you need a delay between two independent calls, yes. If you need delays to slow down a loop, no.
    – WGroleau
    May 31, 2018 at 21:43
63

Use:

  await new Promise(resolve => setTimeout(resolve, 2000));

Make sure your calling function is async. This is verified and is working fine.

1
  • This just yields ReferenceError: wait is not defined. Jul 1 at 14:37
52

I've searched for a sleep solution too (not for production code, only for development and tests) and found this article:

JavaScript sleep() or wait()

...and here's another article with client-side solutions: JavaScript sleep

Also, when you are calling alert(), your code will be paused too, while the alert is shown -- you need to find a way to not display alert, but get the same effect. :)

1
  • 44
    I agree, lots of people are saying, "No, don't do this in production code!" Yeah, um, I don't want to. I want to do it in throwaway test code, and as a result I don't want to spend a lot of time making an elegant solution.
    – user435779
    Oct 17, 2012 at 15:03
34

Here you go. As the code says, don't be a bad developer and use this on websites. It's a development utility function.

// Basic sleep function based on ms.
// DO NOT USE ON PUBLIC FACING WEBSITES.
function sleep(ms) {
    var unixtime_ms = new Date().getTime();
    while(new Date().getTime() < unixtime_ms + ms) {}
}
2
  • 23
    That's basically the same thing as the OP had. Nov 3, 2012 at 2:16
  • 11
    To be more precise, it's what OP asked for an ALTERNATIVE to.
    – WGroleau
    May 25, 2018 at 20:48
32

Since April 2021 (Node.js 16+), a new promisified version of setTimeout() is available:

import { setTimeout } from 'timers/promises'

const res = await setTimeout(2000, 'result')

console.log(res);  // Prints 'result'

Thank @kigiri. See the official documentation: https://nodejs.org/api/timers.html#timerspromisessettimeoutdelay-value-options

1
30

Here's a simple solution using a synchronous XMLHttpRequest:

function sleep(n){
  var request = new XMLHttpRequest();
  request.open('GET', '/sleep.php?n=' + n, false);  // `false` makes the request synchronous
  request.send(null);
}

Contents of file sleep.php:

<?php sleep($_GET['n']);

Now call it with:

sleep(5);

Using an existing server implementation

If you don't have your own application server (for the above PHP script), you could use some online service instead. For instance:

function sleep(n) { 
    var request = new XMLHttpRequest();
    request.open('GET', 'http://httpstat.us/200?sleep=' + n, false);
    request.send(null);
};

sleep(1000);
console.log("one second delay completed.");

Support

About passing false for the asynchronous parameter, mdn notes:

Synchronous requests on the main thread can be easily disruptive to the user experience and should be avoided; in fact, many browsers have deprecated synchronous XHR support on the main thread entirely. Synchronous requests are permitted in Workers.

The actual delay

The number of milliseconds that is passed as argument will be the time that the server waits between receiving the request and sending the response. The delay incurred by transmission and server load will be added to that.

4
  • 5
    @lukad, Use setTimeout() if that works, but if doing so means unraveling 1000 lines of callbacks this might start not looking like a joke. Dec 25, 2014 at 1:01
  • 12
    Unique approach, though unfortunately non-async XMLHttpRequests are deprecated and will be removed in the future. Which is funny, because that fact is what led me to this question in the first place.
    – Beejor
    Jun 14, 2015 at 20:30
  • This is actually a pretty good idea IMO. Although I don't think the sleep API (Request URL) should be public as it can be abused. May 12, 2016 at 13:18
  • nice but do you know if sometime internet is slow or Website ping time is high than it will sleep script for more than argument time. Like if you use sleep(300) and website take time 150 ms for response than javascript code will be sleep for 450ms. and if internet connection is lose by browser it will work for only 0ms. So it is not better solution Apr 24, 2020 at 10:52
27

An inliner:

(async () => await new Promise(resolve => setTimeout(resolve, 500)))();

500 here is the time in milliseconds for which VM will wait before moving to the next line of code.

Bit of tldr;

Basically, when you create a promise, it returns an observable while at creation giving a reference of resolve in a callback meant for handing over data/response once it's available. Here, resolve is called via setTimeOut after 500ms, and till resolve is not executed the outside scope is waiting to proceed further, hence, creating a fake blocking. It's totally different than the non-blocking(or call non-thread-reserving sleep available in other languages), as the thread and most probably the UI and any other ongoing tasks of webpage/node-application will be blocked and the main thread will be exclusively used for awaiting the promise resolution.

3
  • I am unable to grok the part where function resolve is defined as calling itself. How does this make sense?
    – sureshvv
    Jun 30, 2021 at 7:51
  • @sureshvv check update. Oct 5, 2021 at 4:54
  • If want to put in the middle of an async function just use await new Promise(resolve => setTimeout(resolve, sleepMiliseconds)) Feb 1 at 15:27
26

First:

Define a function you want to execute like this:

function alertWorld(){
  alert("Hello, World!");
}

Then schedule its execution with the setTimeout method:

setTimeout(alertWorld, 1000)

Note two things

  • the second argument is time in milliseconds
  • as a first argument, you have to pass just the name (reference) of the function, without the parentheses
1
  • The question was to ask a way to sleep in a blocking wy. setTimeout does not do that. It queues in the Macro task Queue. Mar 28, 2021 at 21:20
26

I personally like the simple:

function sleep(seconds){
    var waitUntil = new Date().getTime() + seconds*1000;
    while(new Date().getTime() < waitUntil) 
        true;
}

then:

sleep(2); // Sleeps for 2 seconds

I'm using it all the time to create fake load times while creating scripts in p5.js.

6
  • 3
    I see this as the most optimized version of the main question: it does not do any maths inside the loop, just a plain comparison. It's a bit difficult to read tho.
    – hegez
    Oct 27, 2017 at 16:45
  • 12
    NEVER EVER DO THAT. Have you checked the CPU usage while this function is working? It should be close to 100% if you give enough time for it.
    – eaorak
    Dec 18, 2017 at 10:46
  • 3
    @hegez: Given the loop is going to run for a fixed amount of wall clock time no matter what, it seems like optimizing the loop is kind of beside the point. Dec 14, 2018 at 1:27
  • @noego How so ? I just tested in Node 10, I have no CPU usage change at all
    – melMass
    Mar 11, 2020 at 16:21
  • 4
    @melMass This function just blocks Node thread for n seconds by keeping the CPU 100% busy. This "solution" is an extremely bad idea for those two reasons (blocking + CPU killer). Waiting HAS to be non-blocking, therefore asynchronous. May 22, 2020 at 9:22
24

2019 Update using Atomics.wait

It should work in Node.js 9.3 or higher.

I needed a pretty accurate timer in Node.js and it works great for that.

However, it seems like there is extremely limited support in browsers.

let ms = 10000;
Atomics.wait(new Int32Array(new SharedArrayBuffer(4)), 0, 0, ms);

Ran a few 10 second timer benchmarks.

With setTimeout I get a error of up to 7000 microseconds (7 ms).

With Atomics, my error seems to stay under 600 microseconds (0.6 ms)

2020 Update: In Summary

function sleep(millis){ // Need help of a server-side page
  let netMillis = Math.max(millis-5, 0); // Assuming 5 ms overhead
  let xhr = new XMLHttpRequest();
  xhr.open('GET', '/sleep.jsp?millis=' + netMillis + '&rand=' + Math.random(), false);
  try{
    xhr.send();
  }catch(e){
  }
}

function sleepAsync(millis){ // Use only in async function
  let netMillis = Math.max(millis-1, 0); // Assuming 1 ms overhead
  return new Promise((resolve) => {
    setTimeout(resolve, netMillis);
  });
}
function sleepSync(millis){ // Use only in worker thread, currently Chrome-only
  Atomics.wait(new Int32Array(new SharedArrayBuffer(4)), 0, 0, millis);
}

function sleepTest(){
  console.time('sleep');
  sleep(1000);
  console.timeEnd('sleep');
}

async function sleepAsyncTest(){
  console.time('sleepAsync');
  await sleepAsync(1000);
  console.timeEnd('sleepAsync');
}

function sleepSyncTest(){
  let source = `${sleepSync.toString()}
    console.time('sleepSync');
    sleepSync(1000);
    console.timeEnd('sleepSync');`;
  let src = 'data:text/javascript,' + encodeURIComponent(source);
  console.log(src);
  var worker = new Worker(src);
}

of which the server-side page, e.g. sleep.jsp, looks like:

<%
try{
  Thread.sleep(Long.parseLong(request.getParameter("millis")));
}catch(InterruptedException e){}
%>
5
  • In my opinion better than the accepted solution which can't be implemented as a simple function without async/await in the caller. Aug 4, 2019 at 10:28
  • 2
    yeah, as long as you are aware that this is blocking and that usually is not a good thing Aug 6, 2019 at 8:43
  • 1
    Pretty cool, but the fact that this is only really supported in Chrome and Firefox doesn't make it very viable for uses on the web. (Nov 2019)
    – JGreatorex
    Nov 8, 2019 at 12:14
  • This was the answer I was looking for! I had no access to async functions :D
    – vitiral
    Feb 7, 2021 at 20:45
  • In the rare situation where blocking is desirable, this is the right solution. I wish I'd seen your answer before I blogged about this thinking I had found a novel solution! In any case, for a detailed explanation, demos and an additional variant of the XHR solution that uses Service Worker: jasonformat.com/javascript-sleep Feb 25, 2021 at 22:54
20

A better solution to make things look like what most people want is to use an anonymous function:

alert('start');
var a = 'foo';
// Lots of code
setTimeout(function(){  // Beginning of code that should run AFTER the timeout
    alert(a);
    // Lots more code
}, 5000);  // Put the timeout here

This is probably the closest you'll get to something that simply does what you want.

Note, if you need multiple sleeps this can get ugly in a hurry and you might actually need to rethink your design.

1
  • this is the one that worked for me on desktop browsers and an older mobile phone. The others I tried didn't work on all.
    – Mike
    Jan 21, 2020 at 4:32
17

One-liner using Promises

const wait = t => new Promise(s => setTimeout(s, t, t));

Typescript with Abort Signal

const wait = (x: number, signal?: AbortSignal): Promise<number> => {
  return new Promise((s, f) => {
    const id = setTimeout(s, x, x);
    signal?.addEventListener('abort', () => {
      clearTimeout(id);
      f('AbortError');
    });
  });
};

Demo

const wait = t => new Promise(s => setTimeout(s, t));
// Usage
async function demo() {
    // Count down
    let i = 6;
    while (i--) {
        await wait(1000);
        console.log(i);
    }
    // Sum of numbers 0 to 5 using by delay of 1 second
    const sum = await [...Array(6).keys()].reduce(async (a, b) => {
        a = await a;
        await wait(1000);
        const result = a + b;
        console.log(`${a} + ${b} = ${result}`);
        return result;
    }, Promise.resolve(0));
    console.log("sum", sum);
}
demo();

1
  • 1
    The copy/pasta is real
    – T.Woody
    Jan 21, 2021 at 22:16
16

The shortest solution without any dependencies:

await new Promise(resolve => setTimeout(resolve, 5000));
4
  • It doesn't work in IE11. We get syntax error for arrow function.
    – DDphp
    Jan 22, 2020 at 7:48
  • @Java-DK use await new Promise(function(resolve) { setTimeout(resolve, 5000); });
    – k06a
    Jan 22, 2020 at 11:43
  • 2
    This is identical to Ahmed Mohammedali's answer (posted first). Jul 6, 2021 at 23:26
  • 2
    @PeterMortensen and it was copied from my different answer I gave at March 2018: stackoverflow.com/a/49139664/440168
    – k06a
    Jul 14, 2021 at 9:42
12

For browsers, I agree that setTimeout and setInterval are the way to go.

But for server-side code, it may require a blocking function (for example, so you can effectively have thread synchronization).

If you're using Node.js and Meteor, you may have run into the limitations of using setTimeout in a fiber. Here is the code for server-side sleep.

var Fiber = require('fibers');

function sleep(ms) {
    var fiber = Fiber.current;
    setTimeout(function() {
        fiber.run();
    }, ms);
    Fiber.yield();
}

Fiber(function() {
    console.log('wait... ' + new Date);
    sleep(1000);
    console.log('ok... ' + new Date);
}).run();
console.log('back in main');

See: Node.js Fibers, Sleep

1
  • 1
    Server may require a blocking function... I don't see how forcefully blocking Node's only thread and make your entire server unresponsive for several seconds is a good idea, but whatever May 22, 2020 at 9:31
12

Most of the answers here are misguided or at the very least outdated. There is no reason JavaScript has to be single threaded, and indeed it isn't. Today all the mainstream browsers support workers. Before this was the case, other JavaScript runtimes like Rhino and Node.js supported multithreading.

'JavaScript is single threaded' is not a valid answer. For example, running a sleep function within a worker would not block any of the code running in the UI thread.

In newer runtimes supporting generators and yield, one could bring similar functionality to the sleep function in a singlethreaded environment:

// This is based on the latest ES6 drafts.
// JavaScript 1.7+ (SpiderMonkey/Firefox 2+) syntax is slightly different

// Run code you want to sleep here (omit star if using JavaScript 1.7)
function* main(){
    for (var i = 0; i < 10; i++) {
        // To sleep for 10 milliseconds 10 times in a row
        yield 10;
    }

    yield 5;
    console.log('I just slept 5 milliseconds!');
}

// Resume the given generator after ms milliseconds
function resume(ms, generator){
    setTimeout(function(){
        // Omit .value if using JavaScript 1.7
        var nextSleep = generator.next().value;
        resume(nextSleep, generator);
    }, ms);
}

// Initialize a generator and get first sleep for the recursive function
var
    generator = main(),
    firstSleep = generator.next().value;

// Initialize recursive resume function
resume(firstSleep, generator);

This imitation of sleep is different from a true sleep function as it does not block the thread. It is simply sugar on top of JavaScript's current setTimeout function. This functionality type has been implemented in Task.js and should work today in Firefox.

2
  • Workers aren't implemented in IE, at least through version 10. Which currently represents a large amount of users.
    – Beejor
    Jun 14, 2015 at 20:44
  • True, and even then it is not practical to implement sleep using multiple workers. If using Node.js generator functions are already implemented and can be used as described. Mainstream browsers have not all implemented generators as of today. Sep 4, 2015 at 15:07
12

I would encapsulate setTimeOut in a Promise for code consistency with other asynchronous tasks: Demo in Fiddle

function sleep(ms)
{
    return(new Promise(function(resolve, reject) {
        setTimeout(function() { resolve(); }, ms);
    }));
}

It is used like this:

sleep(2000).then(function() {
   // Do something
});

It is easy to remember the syntax if you are used to using Promises.

1
  • 4
    Why is this any better than just using setTimeout(function(){/*do something*/}, 2000);?
    – JSideris
    Mar 9, 2016 at 10:15
11

Since Node.js 7.6, you can combine the promisify function from the utils module with setTimeout.

const sleep = require('util').promisify(setTimeout)

General Usage

async function main() {
    console.time("Slept for")
    await sleep(3000)
    console.timeEnd("Slept for")
}

main()

Question Usage

async function asyncGenerator() {
    while (goOn) {
      var fileList = await listFiles(nextPageToken);
      await sleep(3000)
      var parents = await requestParents(fileList);
    }
  }
10

I have searched/googled quite a few webpages on JavaScript sleep/wait... and there is no answer if you want JavaScript to "RUN, DELAY, RUN"... what most people got was either, "RUN, RUN(useless stuff), RUN" or "RUN, RUN + delayed RUN"...

I thought: here is a solution that works... but you have to chop up your running codes...: Yes, I know, this is just an easier to read refactoring... still...

Example 1:

<html>
<body>
<div id="id1">DISPLAY</div>

<script>
// JavaScript sleep by "therealdealsince1982"; copyrighted 2009
// setInterval
var i = 0;

function run() {
    // Pieces of codes to run
    if (i == 0){document.getElementById("id1").innerHTML= "<p>code segment " + i + " is ran</p>"; }
    if (i == 1){document.getElementById("id1").innerHTML= "<p>code segment " + i + " is ran</p>"; }
    if (i == 2){document.getElementById("id1").innerHTML= "<p>code segment " + i + " is ran</p>"; }
    if (i >2){document.getElementById("id1").innerHTML= "<p>code segment " + i + " is ran</p>"; }
    if (i == 5){document.getElementById("id1").innerHTML= "<p>all code segment finished running</p>"; clearInterval(t); } // End interval, stops run
    i++; // Segment of code finished running, next...
}

run();
t = setInterval("run()", 1000);

</script>
</body>
</html>

Example 2:

<html>
<body>
<div id="id1">DISPLAY</div>

<script>
// JavaScript sleep by "therealdealsince1982"; copyrighted 2009
// setTimeout
var i = 0;

function run() {
    // Pieces of codes to run, can use switch statement
    if (i == 0){document.getElementById("id1").innerHTML= "<p>code segment " + i + " ran</p>"; sleep(1000);}
    if (i == 1){document.getElementById("id1").innerHTML= "<p>code segment " + i + " ran</p>"; sleep(2000);}
    if (i == 2){document.getElementById("id1").innerHTML= "<p>code segment " + i + " ran</p>"; sleep(3000);}
    if (i == 3){document.getElementById("id1").innerHTML= "<p>code segment " + i + " ran</p>";} //stops automatically
    i++;
}

function sleep(dur) {t=setTimeout("run()", dur);} // Starts flow control again after 'dur'

run(); // Starts
</script>
</body>
</html>

Example 3:

<html>
<body>
<div id="id1">DISPLAY</div>

<script>
// JavaScript sleep by "therealdealsince1982"; copyrighted 2009
// setTimeout
var i = 0;

function flow() {
    run(i);
    i++; // Code segment finished running, increment i; can put elsewhere
    sleep(1000);
    if (i == 5) {clearTimeout(t);} // Stops flow, must be after sleep()
}

function run(segment) {
    // Pieces of codes to run, can use switch statement
    if (segment == 0){document.getElementById("id1").innerHTML= "<p>code segment " + segment + " is ran</p>"; }
    if (segment == 1){document.getElementById("id1").innerHTML= "<p>code segment " + segment + " is ran</p>"; }
    if (segment == 2){document.getElementById("id1").innerHTML= "<p>code segment " + segment + " is ran</p>"; }
    if (segment >2){document.getElementById("id1").innerHTML= "<p>code segment "+ segment +" is ran</p>"; }
}

function sleep(dur) {t=setTimeout("flow()", dur);} // Starts flow control again after 'dur'

flow(); // Starts flow
</script>
</body>
</html>

Example 4:

<html>
<body>
<div id="id1">DISPLAY</div>

<script>
// JavaScript sleep by "therealdealsince1982"; copyrighted 2009
// setTimeout, switch
var i = 0;

function flow() {
    switch(i)
    {
        case 0:
            run(i);
            sleep(1000);
            break;
        case 1:
            run(i);
            sleep(2000);
            break;
        case 5:
            run(i);
            clearTimeout(t); // Stops flow
            break;
        default:
            run(i);
            sleep(3000);
            break;
    }
}

function run(segment) {
    // Pieces of codes to run, can use switch statement
    if (segment == 0){document.getElementById("id1").innerHTML= "<p>code segment " + segment + " is ran</p>"; }
    if (segment == 1){document.getElementById("id1").innerHTML= "<p>code segment " + segment + " is ran</p>"; }
    if (segment == 2){document.getElementById("id1").innerHTML= "<p>code segment " + segment + " is ran</p>"; }
    if (segment >2){document.getElementById("id1").innerHTML= "<p>code segment " + segment + " is ran</p>"; }
    i++; // Current segment of code finished running, next...
}

function sleep(dur) {t=setTimeout("flow()", dur);} // Starts flow control again after 'dur'

flow(); // Starts flow control for first time...
</script>
</body>
</html>
1
  • 5
    Ok, this works with setTimeput, but it's hard to see what's happening. Using setTimeout itself is easier than this.
    – naugtur
    Aug 9, 2011 at 8:19
9

I can understand the purpose of a sleep function if you have to deal with synchronous execution. The setInterval and setTimeout functions create a parallel execution thread which returns the execution sequence back to the main program, which is ineffective if you have to wait for a given result. Of course one may use events and handlers, but in some cases is not what is intended.

9
function sleep(milliseconds) {
  var start = new Date().getTime();
  for (var i = 0; i < 1e7; i++) {
    if ((new Date().getTime() - start) > milliseconds){
      break;
    }
  }
}
3
  • 1
    It's the same as the real question. Not much point making it the real answer.
    – EML
    Jun 12, 2014 at 19:16
  • 2
    Not a good solution - using this in Selenium's JavaScriptExecutor hangs my Chrome browser about 50% of the time on a 2104 MacBook Pro.
    – emery
    May 6, 2015 at 17:33
  • An explanation would be in order. What is the idea/gist? How is it different from previous answers? Jul 6, 2021 at 16:36
9

If you want less clunky functions than setTimeout and setInterval, you can wrap them in functions that just reverse the order of the arguments and give them nice names:

function after(ms, fn){ setTimeout(fn, ms); }
function every(ms, fn){ setInterval(fn, ms); }

CoffeeScript versions:

after = (ms, fn)-> setTimeout fn, ms
every = (ms, fn)-> setInterval fn, ms

You can then use them nicely with anonymous functions:

after(1000, function(){
    console.log("it's been a second");
    after(1000, function(){
        console.log("it's been another second");
    });
});

Now it reads easily as "after N milliseconds, ..." (or "every N milliseconds, ...")

9

I suggest this method for former python developers

const sleep = (time) => {
   return new Promise((resolve) => setTimeout(resolve, Math.ceil(time * 1000)));
};

Usage:

await sleep(10) // for 10 seconds
8

You can't do a sleep like that in JavaScript, or, rather, you shouldn't. Running a sleep or a while loop will cause the user's browser to hang until the loop is done.

Use a timer, as specified in the link you referenced.

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