5

If I got a list in Groovy containing 2 or more variables with some value, and I want to see if it contains a given text string I'm doing the following:

def msg = '''
 Hello Mars!
'''

def msg1 = '''
 Hello world!
'''


def list = [msg, msg1]

list.findAll { w -> 
    if(w.contains("Hello"))
    {
        println w
    }
    else
    {
        println "Not there"
    }
}

But instead of printing the value I would like to print the variable name that contains the text. Is that possible with a list or do I need to make a map?

  • each is probably better than findAll in this situation? – tim_yates Mar 1 '12 at 9:12
6

You need to use a Map, because mapping from keys to values.

def msg = '''
 Hello Mars!
'''

def msg1 = '''
 Hello world!
'''

def map = [msg: msg, msg1: msg1]

map.findAll { key, value -> 
    if (value.contains("Hello")) {
        println key
    }
    else {
        println "Not there"
    }
}
| improve this answer | |
  • Okay so I need to use a Map, and map them to them self? I was hoping there was a Name method or something like that. – Nyegaard Mar 1 '12 at 9:46
  • @Nyegaard no, Strings, ints, etc do not remember their name at declaration. Can't think of any language where they do... – tim_yates Mar 1 '12 at 10:31
4

If you are running this as a Groovy script, you may use the binding archive instead of a list of variables, but you need to assign the variables without the def (so they become part of the binding). Something like:

aaa = 'Hello World!'
bbb = 'Goodbye all!'
ccc = 'Hello Mars!'

this.binding.variables.each { var ->
    if (var.value ==~ /Hello.*/)
        println "$var.key contains 'Hello'"
}

Output:

aaa contains 'Hello'
ccc contains 'Hello'
| improve this answer | |

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.