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In Linux/KDE, I can see a directory as a tree. How can I do it in Windows 7?

Consider I do NOT mean "Windows Explorer". This just shows the directories, I also want the files.

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  • 7
    @Luke: it is useful for me, I always use it where it is available (Linux/Mac). And I do not need a tree view of the system32 directory, just of my own projects (e.g. you can get a tree view of your source code).
    – Pietro
    Mar 2, 2012 at 8:47
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    @Luke: What do you mean with: "it's not terribly hard to do it yourself"? Should I learn the Windows API and write such an utility by myself?
    – Pietro
    Mar 2, 2012 at 8:50
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    This site is about programming so I assumed you were looking for either a 3rd party control or to write it yourself. I'm sure there are programs out there that already do it, though I'm not familiar with any.
    – Luke
    Mar 2, 2012 at 13:07
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    This might be more suited for SuperUser instead of SO.
    – Cornelius
    Oct 30, 2012 at 12:59
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    It is very useful to have a tree view in windows. I am facing situations where I have to add a module or library that has lots of files. Easily than 50 files and sometimes well over 100 files. On my MacBook Pro, I see the enclosing folder collapsed and I just drap it with the mouse and stage it for the next commit. On Windows, I have to scroll down and select individual files. Such a waste of time. And it often happened that I missed some files during the commit. Even on system32, tree is supported. I develop on MS Visual Studio and there is a tree view control. I have used it several times.
    – asiby
    Oct 28, 2013 at 16:14

6 Answers 6

163

In the Windows command prompt you can use "tree /F" to view a tree of the current folder and all descending files & folders.

In File Explorer under Windows 8.1:

  • Select folder
  • Press Shift, right-click mouse, and select "Open command window here"
  • Type tree /f > tree.txt and press Enter
  • Use MS Word to open "tree.txt"
  • The dialog box "File Conversion - tree.txt" will open
  • For "Text encoding" tick the "MS-DOS" option

You now have an editable tree structure file.

This works for versions of Windows from Windows XP to Windows 8.1.

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    That's something, but I need it in the GUI.
    – Pietro
    Mar 1, 2012 at 15:37
  • This doesn't work for me on Windows 7 command prompt.
    – Lou
    Mar 23, 2014 at 15:46
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    There is an ascii variant, which may be preferable for opening the file in Notepad or anything other Word. Replace the command at step three with "tree /f /a > tree.txt" and ignore steps four to six. Aug 10, 2016 at 10:12
  • 2
    Works great on Windows 10's cmd.exe.
    – phil_lgr
    Mar 20, 2017 at 15:42
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    Type tree /f > tree.doc and press Enter to save to Word format.
    – MGB.py
    Dec 13, 2019 at 9:53
67

tree /f /a

About

The Windows command tree /f /a produces a tree of the current folder and all files & folders contained within it in ASCII format.

The output can be redirected to a text file using the > parameter.

Method

For Windows 8.1 or Windows 10, follow these steps:

  1. Navigate into the folder in file explorer.
  2. Press Shift, right-click mouse, and select "Open command window here".
  3. Type tree /f /a > tree.txt and press Enter.
  4. Open the new tree.txt file in your favourite text editor/viewer.

Note: Windows 7, Vista, XP and earlier users can type cmd in the run command box in the start menu for a command window.

27

I recommend WinDirStat.

I frequently use WinDirStat to create screen shots for user documentation of open folders and their contents.

It even uses the correct icons for Windows registered file types.

All I would say is missing is an option to display the files without their icons. I can live without it personally, since I am usually pasting the image into a paint program or Visio to edit it, but it would still be a useful feature.

5
  • WinDirStat is a brilliant program and the pillow charts it proceduces are perfect for viewing huge files over an entire partition. Aug 10, 2016 at 10:38
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    Am I missing something obvious, or do I have to click on the "+" for each directory to get it to expand the directory listing? I can't find any "expand all" option.
    – RenniePet
    Jan 22, 2018 at 2:14
  • Does WinDirStat work well on Windows 10? Last release seems 11 years old. Apr 6, 2019 at 21:40
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    WinDirStat runs well on Windows 10 Apr 23, 2019 at 14:47
  • @RenniePet You are not missing anything obvious ... you do have to click on the "+" for each directory with WinDirStat. It's astounding that there still doesn't seem to be any utility for Windows that will fully expand a directory in a graphical view with a single click.
    – skomisa
    Jul 14, 2019 at 14:15
8

If it is just viewing in tree view,One workaround is to use the Explorer in Notepad++ or any other tools.

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    I couldn't find this, can you give some more details please?
    – radsdau
    Oct 5, 2015 at 23:06
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    View -> Folder as Workspace, then right click in Folder as Workspace pane, select Add, browse to the folder you want to view and click OK. Nov 8, 2018 at 15:17
2

TreeSize professional has what you want. but it focus on the sizes of folders and files.

2

You can use Internet Explorer to browse folders and files together in tree. It is a file explorer in Favorites Window. You just need replace "favorites folder" to folder which you want see as a root folder

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  • 1
    Does not work in Windows 10, it directly pops up the Windows Explorer window with the selected path.
    – Harsha J K
    Nov 12, 2018 at 14:13

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