406

I try to add margin values on a div inside another div. All works fine except the top value, it seems to be ignored. But why?

What I expected:
What I expected with margin:50px 50px 50px 50px;

What I get:
What I get with margin:50px 50px 50px 50px;

Code:

#outer {
        width: 500px; 
        height: 200px; 
        background: #FFCCCC;
        margin: 50px auto 0 auto;
        display: block;
}
#inner {
        background: #FFCC33;
        margin: 50px 50px 50px 50px;
        padding: 10px;
        display: block;
}
<div id="outer">
  <div id="inner">
    Hello world!
  </div>
</div>

W3Schools have no explanation to why margin behaves this way.

8
  • 5
    did you try floating the inner one?
    – Rooster
    Mar 1, 2012 at 16:20
  • 9
    hum.. With float:left; it works... but why is this needed. I do not want it to float. And why does margin for left/right work?
    – jamietelin
    Mar 1, 2012 at 16:22
  • 62
    Welcome to the fun world of the CSS margin collapse algorithm!
    – GordonM
    Mar 1, 2012 at 16:27
  • 3
    You know nothing, Jon Snow..
    – jamietelin
    Jun 2, 2015 at 7:15
  • 3
    I can't remember when CSS went so complicated. Its just for displaying elements and I see many ppl struggling with it. It doesn't feel like you learn it you have to "study" it.
    – Jonny
    Oct 9, 2016 at 15:34

14 Answers 14

524

You're actually seeing the top margin of the #inner element collapse into the top edge of the #outer element, leaving only the #outer margin intact (albeit not shown in your images). The top edges of both boxes are flush against each other because their margins are equal.

Here are the relevant points from the W3C spec:

8.3.1 Collapsing margins

In CSS, the adjoining margins of two or more boxes (which might or might not be siblings) can combine to form a single margin. Margins that combine this way are said to collapse, and the resulting combined margin is called a collapsed margin.

Adjoining vertical margins collapse [...]

Two margins are adjoining if and only if:

  • both belong to in-flow block-level boxes that participate in the same block formatting context
  • no line boxes, no clearance, no padding and no border separate them
  • both belong to vertically-adjacent box edges, i.e. form one of the following pairs:
    • top margin of a box and top margin of its first in-flow child

You can do any of the following to prevent the margin from collapsing:

The reason the above options prevent the margin from collapsing is because:

  • Margins between a floated box and any other box do not collapse (not even between a float and its in-flow children).
  • Margins of elements that establish new block formatting contexts (such as floats and elements with 'overflow' other than 'visible') do not collapse with their in-flow children.
  • Margins of inline-block boxes do not collapse (not even with their in-flow children).

The left and right margins behave as you expect because:

Horizontal margins never collapse.

7
  • 18
    Apparently, you're not the only one to think it's stupid...
    – BoltClock
    Mar 11, 2012 at 5:02
  • 2
    This answer rocks! Just something to add. Your quote of w3c says it but I only realized now. So just to be clear for others you could also give #outer a border.
    – driechel
    Feb 23, 2014 at 22:55
  • The link in Floating seems to be broken.
    – E.P.
    May 14, 2015 at 12:35
  • @episanty: That's what happens when you link to a comment. Unlinked.
    – BoltClock
    May 14, 2015 at 12:36
  • I know - just wanted to let you know. Since you're ♦-enabled I figured you might want to resurrect the comment - or change your post accordingly. Thanks for the good answer, by the way.
    – E.P.
    May 14, 2015 at 12:44
122

Try using display: inline-block; on the inner div. Like so:

#outer {
    width:500px; 
    height:200px; 
    background:#FFCCCC;
    margin:50px auto 0 auto;
    display:block;
}
#inner {
    background:#FFCC33;
    margin:50px 50px 50px 50px;
    padding:10px;
    display:inline-block;
}
5
  • 13
    Good answer. Would be better if it explained why this change fixes the problem.
    – JohnFx
    Mar 1, 2012 at 16:23
  • 1
    Ok, that is freaky! Why does that work? What is the logical explanation to why it doesn't work as one would expect. Margin left / right works without display:inline-block;. Also set back for when using display:inline-block; is that you lose the width of 100% on the div.
    – jamietelin
    Mar 1, 2012 at 16:25
  • 5
    switching it to inline-block forces the browser to reevaluate the size of the div after its placed and other rules are applied.
    – Rooster
    Mar 1, 2012 at 16:26
  • Tried it for my problem, made a staircase effect.
    – Jonny
    Oct 9, 2016 at 16:04
  • It's magic!!!!! A 2012 answer save me!! Mar 29 at 21:05
31

What @BoltClock mentioned are pretty solid. And Here I just want to add several more solutions for this problem. check this w3c_collapsing margin. The green parts are the potential thought how this problem can be solved.

Solution 1

Margins between a floated box and any other box do not collapse (not even between a float and its in-flow children).

that means I can add float:left to either #outer or #inner demo1.

also notice that float would invalidate the auto in margin.

Solution 2

Margins of elements that establish new block formatting contexts (such as floats and elements with 'overflow' other than 'visible') do not collapse with their in-flow children.

other than visible, let's put overflow: hidden into #outer. And this way seems pretty simple and decent. I like it.

#outer{
    width: 500px;
    height: 200px;
    background: #FFCCCC;
    margin: 50px auto;
    overflow: hidden;
}
#inner {
    background: #FFCC33;
    height: 50px;
    margin: 50px;
}

Solution 3

Margins of absolutely positioned boxes do not collapse (not even with their in-flow children).

#outer{
    width: 500px;
    height: 200px;
    background: #FFCCCC;
    margin: 50px auto;
    position: absolute; 
}
#inner{
    background: #FFCC33;
    height: 50px;
    margin: 50px;
}

or

#outer{
    width: 500px;
    height: 200px;
    background: #FFCCCC;
    margin: 50px auto;
    position: relative; 
}
#inner {
    background: #FFCC33;
    height: 50px;
    margin: 50px;
    position: absolute;
}

these two methods will break the normal flow of div

Solution 4

Margins of inline-block boxes do not collapse (not even with their in-flow children).

is the same as @enderskill

Solution 5

The bottom margin of an in-flow block-level element always collapses with the top margin of its next in-flow block-level sibling, unless that sibling has clearance.

This has not much work to do with the question since it is the collapsing margin between siblings. it generally means if a top-box has margin-bottom: 30px and a sibling-box has margin-top: 10px. The total margin between them is 30px instead of 40px.

Solution 6

The top margin of an in-flow block element collapses with its first in-flow block-level child's top margin if the element has no top border, no top padding, and the child has no clearance.

This is very interesting and I can just add one top border line

#outer{
    width: 500px;
    height: 200px;
    background: #FFCCCC;
    margin: 50px auto;
    border-top: 1px solid red;

}
#inner {
    background: #FFCC33;
    height: 50px;
    margin: 50px;

}

And Also <div> is block-level in default, so you don't have to declare it on purpose. Sorry for not being able to post more than 2 links and images due to my novice reputation. At least you know where the problem comes from next time you see something similar.

21

Not sure why what you have doesn't work, but you can add overflow: auto; to the outer div.

1
  • Loads of different solutions to this problem. Thanks! This answer combined with @BoltClock´s answer provides good information on why this solution does work.
    – jamietelin
    Mar 1, 2012 at 16:31
18

Not exactly sure why, but changing the inner CSS to

display: inline-block;

seems to work.

0
15

If you add any padding to #outer, it works. Demo here:

#outer {
    width:500px; 
    height:200px; 
    background:#FFCCCC;
    margin:50px auto 0 auto;
    display:block;
    padding-top:1px;
}
#inner {
    background:#FFCC33;
    margin:50px 50px 50px 50px;
    padding:10px;
    display:block;
}
<div id="outer">
    <div id="inner">
        Hello world!
    </div>
</div>

4

Doesn't answer the "why" (has to be something w/ collapsing margin), but seems like the easiest/most logical way to do what you're trying to do would be to just add padding-top to the outer div:

#outer {
    width:500px; 
    height:200px; 
    background:#FFCCCC;
    margin:50px auto 0 auto;
    padding-top: 50px;
}
#inner {
    background:#FFCC33;
    margin:0px 50px 50px 50px;
    padding:10px;
}
<div id="outer">
    <div id="inner">
        Hello world!
    </div>
</div>

Minor note - it shouldn't be necessary to set a div to display:block; unless there's something else in your code telling it not to be block.

3

Create new block formatting context

You can use display: flow-root on the parent element to prevent margin collapsing through the containing element as it creates new Block Formatting Context.

Changing the value of the overflow property to auto or using flexbox will have the same effect.

https://codepen.io/rachelandrew/pen/VJXjEp

3

Try this:

#outer {
    width:500px; 
    height:200px; 
    background:#FFCCCC;
    margin:50px auto 0 auto;
    display:table;
}
#inner {
    background:#FFCC33;
    margin:50px 50px 50px 50px;
    padding:10px;
    display:block;
}
<div id="outer">
    <div id="inner">
        Hello world!
    </div>
</div>

Good luck!

2

I guess setting the position property of the #inner div to relative may also help achieve the effect. But anyways I tried the original code pasted in the Question on IE9 and latest Google Chrome and they already give the desirable effect without any modifications.

2

Use padding-top:50pxfor outer div. Something like this:

#outer {
    width:500px; 
    height:200px; 
    background:#FFCCCC;
    margin:50px auto 0 auto;
    display:table;}

Note: padding will increase the size of your div. In this case if the size of your div is important, I mean if it must have a specific height. decrease the height by 50px.:

#outer {
    width:500px; 
    height:150px; 
    background:#FFCCCC;
    margin:50px auto 0 auto;
    display:table;}
0
1

Have you tried !important before all, it will force everything:

margin:50px 50px 50px 50px !important;
0

If you have a margin collapse issue, then to resolve this you can add display: flow-root; to the parent container.

Aside from that, if margin-top is being ignored, try margin-top with a negative value, for instance: margin-top: -2px;

-2

Just for a quick fix, try wrapping your child elements into a div element like this -

<div id="outer">
   <div class="divadjust" style="padding-top: 1px">
      <div id="inner">
         Hello world!
      </div>
   </div>
</div>

Margin of inner div won't collapse due to the padding of 1px in-between outer and inner div. So logically you will have 1px extra space along with existing margin of inner div.

0

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