15

Here is some sample code:

IList<MyType> myList1=new List<MyType>();
IList<MyType> myList2=new List<MyType>();

// Populate myList1
...
// Add contents of myList1 to myList2
myList2.Add(myList1); // Does not compile

How do I add the contents of one list to another - is there a method for this?

  • targetList.AddRange(sourceList); – vulkanino Mar 1 '12 at 16:46
  • 1
    @vulkanino AddRange is a method of List<>, not IList<>. – phoog Mar 1 '12 at 16:49
  • yes, sorry, I meant a cast which I didn't specify. – vulkanino Mar 1 '12 at 16:51
  • 1
    @vulkanino a cast only works if the runtime type of the object is in fact List<MyType> or a derived type. IList<MyType> could refer to an object whose type is MyType[]; that would throw an exception. – phoog Mar 1 '12 at 17:10
  • 1
    Why are so many of those answering opposed to using a simple for loop and instead would rather re-create one or more entire lists just so that they can say that they used LINQ and wrote one less line of code. When did for loops become evil? – Servy Mar 1 '12 at 17:13
25

There's no great built-in way to do this. Really what you want is an AddRange method but it doesn't exist on the IList<T> (or it's hierarchy). Defining a new extension method though for this is straight forward

public static void AddRange<T>(this ICollection<T> collection, IEnumerable<T> enumerable) {
  foreach (var cur in enumerable) {
    collection.Add(cur);
  }
}

myList2.AddRange(myList1);
  • I am an upvoter, not a downvoter, but it might be because "it's overkill to declare a method for such a simple task." I received similar criticism for an answer of mine; the method was maybe 5 or 6 lines of code, which saved only a couple of lines of code at the call site. But the call site was changed to a single expression rather than 2 or 3 statements, and, of course, if the method is used more than a handful of times, there's a net decrease in lines of code. – phoog Mar 1 '12 at 16:57
  • @phoog yeah, if i were using it just once I would just inline the foreach. This though is one of the standard extension methods (like ForEach) which I just define in every project I write. They're so incredibly useful. – JaredPar Mar 1 '12 at 16:59
  • 2
    I dig this solution even if it adds more lines of code, because the code at the point of call will be cleaner. I'm all for clarity at the point of call. And you have to know that once it's written you'll find yourself using it again because it appears in IntelliSense. – Mike Hofer Mar 1 '12 at 17:01
  • @Tim: That's on IEnumerable<T>, not @IList<T>. – Mike Hofer Mar 1 '12 at 17:03
  • 1
    @RhinoDevX64 JaredPar's extension method could be applied to any ICollection<T>, including HashSet<T>, for example. – phoog Mar 1 '12 at 17:32
12

If you declare both list types as the concrete List instead of IList, you can use the AddRange method:

List<MyType> myList1=new List<MyType>();
List<MyType> myList2=new List<MyType>();

myList2.AddRange(myList1);

otherwise you could use LINQ to combine the two:

using System.Linq;

IList<MyType> myList1=new List<MyType>();
IList<MyType> myList2=new List<MyType>();

var newList = myList1.Concat(myList2);
  • 1
    Although the LINQ solution looks nice at the point of call, it has the inefficiency of making a new list with the combined items. – Michael Goldshteyn Mar 1 '12 at 18:37
  • Michael, any way have pros and contras (: – Lonli-Lokli Mar 2 '12 at 9:03
11

Use Enumerablr extension,

myList2=new List<MyType>(myList2.Concat(myList1))

BTW, if you do not populate myList2, you can just create it based on myLis1.

EDIT

I've try to research perfomance for several cases

1) AddRange via Add

List2.AddRange(List1);

public static class AddRangeUtils
{
    public static void AddRange<T>(this ICollection<T> collection, IEnumerable<T> enumerable)
    {
        foreach (var cur in enumerable)
        {
            collection.Add(cur);
        }
    }
}

2) Concat

List2 = new List<TestClass>(List2.Concat(List1))

3) Predefined Collection Count 1

var thirdList = new List<TestClass>(List2.Count + List1.Count);
foreach (var testClass in List1)
{
   thirdList.Add(testClass);
}
foreach (var testClass in List2)
{
   thirdList.Add(testClass);
}
List2 = thirdList;

4) Predefined Collection Count 2

var thirdList = new List<TestClass>(List2.Count + List1.Count);
thirdList.AddRange(List1);
thirdList.AddRange(List2);
List2 = thirdList;

Collection's Count is the count of elements for each list, List1 and List2: And came to such results (with different collection's length)

results for calculation

  • 1
    This doesn't add the value to myList2 though. It instead creates a new List<T> value. This is different than what the OP is asking for. – JaredPar Mar 1 '12 at 16:51
  • Of cource, you need to assign it to myList. Ok, I've modified – Lonli-Lokli Mar 1 '12 at 16:54
  • 2
    This has horrible time complexity if multiple lists get appended. – Michael Goldshteyn Mar 1 '12 at 17:00
  • It will a take a lot of time any way, even in case of copy from two arrays into third, or iterating per each item from one list and add via Add method. – Lonli-Lokli Mar 2 '12 at 4:42
0

If the run-time type of the second list is List<T>, you can cast to that type and use the AddRange() method.

Otherwise, you have to do it yourself with a loop. Alternatively, you could use linq to create a new list containing the contents of both source lists.

0

I used this one line approach:

Array.ForEach(ilist1.ToArray(), x => ilist2.Add(x));

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