58

I am trying to develop a very simple client / server where the client converts a file to bytes, sends it to the server, and then converts the bytes back in to a file.

Currently the program just creates an empty file. I'm not a fantastic Java developer so any help much appreciated.

This is the server part that receives what the client sends.

ServerSocket serverSocket = null;

    serverSocket = new ServerSocket(4444);


    Socket socket = null;
    socket = serverSocket.accept();

    DataOutputStream out = new DataOutputStream(new BufferedOutputStream(socket.getOutputStream()));
    DataInputStream in = new DataInputStream(new BufferedInputStream(socket.getInputStream()));
    byte[] bytes = new byte[1024];

    in.read(bytes);
    System.out.println(bytes);

    FileOutputStream fos = new FileOutputStream("C:\\test2.xml");
    fos.write(bytes);

And here is the client part

Socket socket = null;
    DataOutputStream out = null;
    DataInputStream in = null;
    String host = "127.0.0.1";     

    socket = new Socket(host, 4444);
    out = new DataOutputStream(new BufferedOutputStream(socket.getOutputStream()));
    in = new DataInputStream(new BufferedInputStream(socket.getInputStream()));

    File file = new File("C:\\test.xml");
    //InputStream is = new FileInputStream(file);
    // Get the size of the file
    long length = file.length();
    if (length > Integer.MAX_VALUE) {
        System.out.println("File is too large.");
    }
    byte[] bytes = new byte[(int) length];

    //out.write(bytes);
    System.out.println(bytes);

    out.close();
    in.close();
    socket.close();
  • I bet you threw away all the exceptions... Please post the whole program. – artbristol Mar 1 '12 at 17:27
  • 8
    Your client doesn't write anything to its output stream, and your server ignores the result of the read method. Google for "Java IO tutorial". – JB Nizet Mar 1 '12 at 17:30
  • are the answers to the solution can be modified for chat and file sharing on same time and same socket stream – Nimish Bansal May 31 '18 at 18:08
66

The correct way to copy a stream in Java is as follows:

int count;
byte[] buffer = new byte[8192]; // or 4096, or more
while ((count = in.read(buffer)) > 0)
{
  out.write(buffer, 0, count);
}

Wish I had a dollar for every time I've posted that in a forum.

  • Thank you! I've looked at the read method - where you've written count, that'll be the length of the file is that correct? Also, how would you reverse that code when the bytes are received? – Rookie Mar 3 '12 at 11:25
  • 1
    No, count is an int variable where the result of each read() method call is stored, as the code says. The code when receiving is identical, just different ins and outs. – user207421 Mar 3 '12 at 11:28
  • Alternate correct way: Guava's ByteSTreams.copy(InputStream from, OutputStream to) – yshavit Dec 30 '15 at 21:53
  • @yshavit There are dozens of wrappers for it, but they all execute this code, and if they don't they should. – user207421 Jun 3 '16 at 2:32
  • 1
    how do I set the buffer size on the server when the size of the received file is previously unknown? – keinabel Nov 27 '16 at 14:41
64

Thanks for the help, I've managed to get it working now so thought I would post so that the others can use to help them.

Server

public class Server {
    public static void main(String[] args) throws IOException {
        ServerSocket serverSocket = null;

        try {
            serverSocket = new ServerSocket(4444);
        } catch (IOException ex) {
            System.out.println("Can't setup server on this port number. ");
        }

        Socket socket = null;
        InputStream in = null;
        OutputStream out = null;

        try {
            socket = serverSocket.accept();
        } catch (IOException ex) {
            System.out.println("Can't accept client connection. ");
        }

        try {
            in = socket.getInputStream();
        } catch (IOException ex) {
            System.out.println("Can't get socket input stream. ");
        }

        try {
            out = new FileOutputStream("M:\\test2.xml");
        } catch (FileNotFoundException ex) {
            System.out.println("File not found. ");
        }

        byte[] bytes = new byte[16*1024];

        int count;
        while ((count = in.read(bytes)) > 0) {
            out.write(bytes, 0, count);
        }

        out.close();
        in.close();
        socket.close();
        serverSocket.close();
    }
}

and the Client

public class Client {
    public static void main(String[] args) throws IOException {
        Socket socket = null;
        String host = "127.0.0.1";

        socket = new Socket(host, 4444);

        File file = new File("M:\\test.xml");
        // Get the size of the file
        long length = file.length();
        byte[] bytes = new byte[16 * 1024];
        InputStream in = new FileInputStream(file);
        OutputStream out = socket.getOutputStream();

        int count;
        while ((count = in.read(bytes)) > 0) {
            out.write(bytes, 0, count);
        }

        out.close();
        in.close();
        socket.close();
    }
}
  • 5
    There is no reason to waste space by allocating a buffer the size of the entire file: this doesn't scale to large files, or work at all for files over 2GB. A buffer of 8192 is adequate for most purposes. It doesn't have to have anything to do with the socket receive buffer size either. You don't need any of the flush() calls and you only need to close 'out' and 'bis'. Too much unnecessary and wasteful code here. – user207421 Jul 4 '14 at 14:55
  • 2
    if (length > Integer.MAX_VALUE) should be if (length > Long.MAX_VALUE) because length is long not int – Altiano Gerung Jun 7 '15 at 9:03
  • 1
    @AltianoGerung the reason this check is done is because a array cannot be larger. But the check is not needed if the array has a much smaller fixed size (16k). I removed this part, as for an accepted answer it should not be that platantly wrong. – eckes Jun 27 '15 at 9:20
  • 2
    @AltianoGerung A long can't be greater than Long.MAX_VALUE. Your suggestion does not make sense. – user207421 May 16 '16 at 20:06
  • 1
    I'm using the byte method for sending a image file from a client to a server. Does anyone else get stuck up on the while loop. I get it to send the file and I can open it while the server is running but the file says it is 0 byte in size. Any Ideas? – Kayracer Sep 9 '17 at 2:59
3

Here is the server Open a stream to the file and send it overnetwork

import java.io.BufferedInputStream;
import java.io.File;
import java.io.FileInputStream;
import java.io.IOException;
import java.io.OutputStream;
import java.net.ServerSocket;
import java.net.Socket;

public class SimpleFileServer {

  public final static int SOCKET_PORT = 5501;
  public final static String FILE_TO_SEND = "file.txt";

  public static void main (String [] args ) throws IOException {
    FileInputStream fis = null;
    BufferedInputStream bis = null;
    OutputStream os = null;
    ServerSocket servsock = null;
    Socket sock = null;
    try {
      servsock = new ServerSocket(SOCKET_PORT);
      while (true) {
        System.out.println("Waiting...");
        try {
          sock = servsock.accept();
          System.out.println("Accepted connection : " + sock);
          // send file
          File myFile = new File (FILE_TO_SEND);
          byte [] mybytearray  = new byte [(int)myFile.length()];
          fis = new FileInputStream(myFile);
          bis = new BufferedInputStream(fis);
          bis.read(mybytearray,0,mybytearray.length);
          os = sock.getOutputStream();
          System.out.println("Sending " + FILE_TO_SEND + "(" + mybytearray.length + " bytes)");
          os.write(mybytearray,0,mybytearray.length);
          os.flush();
          System.out.println("Done.");
        } catch (IOException ex) {
          System.out.println(ex.getMessage()+": An Inbound Connection Was Not Resolved");
        }
        }finally {
          if (bis != null) bis.close();
          if (os != null) os.close();
          if (sock!=null) sock.close();
        }
      }
    }
    finally {
      if (servsock != null)
        servsock.close();
    }
  }
}

Here is the client Recive the file being sent overnetwork

import java.io.BufferedOutputStream;
import java.io.FileOutputStream;
import java.io.IOException;
import java.io.InputStream;
import java.net.Socket;

public class SimpleFileClient {

  public final static int SOCKET_PORT = 5501;
  public final static String SERVER = "127.0.0.1";
  public final static String
       FILE_TO_RECEIVED = "file-rec.txt";

  public final static int FILE_SIZE = Integer.MAX_VALUE;

  public static void main (String [] args ) throws IOException {
    int bytesRead;
    int current = 0;
    FileOutputStream fos = null;
    BufferedOutputStream bos = null;
    Socket sock = null;
    try {
      sock = new Socket(SERVER, SOCKET_PORT);
      System.out.println("Connecting...");

      // receive file
      byte [] mybytearray  = new byte [FILE_SIZE];
      InputStream is = sock.getInputStream();
      fos = new FileOutputStream(FILE_TO_RECEIVED);
      bos = new BufferedOutputStream(fos);
      bytesRead = is.read(mybytearray,0,mybytearray.length);
      current = bytesRead;

      do {
         bytesRead =
            is.read(mybytearray, current, (mybytearray.length-current));
         if(bytesRead >= 0) current += bytesRead;
      } while(bytesRead > -1);

      bos.write(mybytearray, 0 , current);
      bos.flush();
      System.out.println("File " + FILE_TO_RECEIVED
          + " downloaded (" + current + " bytes read)");
    }
    finally {
      if (fos != null) fos.close();
      if (bos != null) bos.close();
      if (sock != null) sock.close();
    }
  }    
}
1

To avoid the limitation of the file size , which can cause the Exception java.lang.OutOfMemoryError to be thrown when creating an array of the file size byte[] bytes = new byte[(int) length];, instead we could do

    byte[] bytearray = new byte[1024*16];
    FileInputStream fis = null;
    try {

        fis = new FileInputStream(file);
        OutputStream output= socket.getOututStream();
        BufferedInputStream bis = new BufferedInputStream(fis);

        int readLength = -1;
        while ((readLength = bis.read(bytearray)) > 0) {
            output.write(bytearray, 0, readLength);

        }
        bis.close();
        output.close();
    }
    catch(Exception ex ){

        ex.printStackTrace();
    } //Excuse the poor exception handling...
  • new byte[100*1024]; this is 100KB not 100MB. – Robert Dec 11 '14 at 8:16
  • Even that is far too much. You don't need any more buffering than will fit into the socket send buffer, and that is typically not more than 64k. – user207421 Jun 27 '15 at 9:17
  • @EJP I do realize that the 100MB buffer was nothing but a memory waste, thanks to you. – QuakeCore Jun 27 '15 at 11:37
0

Rookie, if you want to write a file to server by socket, how about using fileoutputstream instead of dataoutputstream? dataoutputstream is more fit for protocol-level read-write. it is not very reasonable for your code in bytes reading and writing. loop to read and write is necessary in java io. and also, you use a buffer way. flush is necessary. here is a code sample: http://www.rgagnon.com/javadetails/java-0542.html

  • Ah this is useful thank you! Question - the receive code, the filesize to be received his set statically. How would you go about setting this dynamically? Is there a way of sending the file length before the bytes array maybe? – Rookie Mar 3 '12 at 11:32
  • 2
    You can't use FileOutputStream to a socket, and there's nothing wrong with using DataOutputStream in this way. This answer doesn't make sense. – user207421 Jan 15 '14 at 20:17
  • 1
    And flush() is not necessary before close(), and the code in the link you provided doesn't do any of the things you've recommended here. It also doesn't work. – user207421 May 22 '15 at 6:40
  • @LucasAmos It is garbage. For example, the author doesn't explain how the client is magically going to know the fie size in advance, or why the entire file should be loaded into memory at both ends. It will fail spectacularly on empty files. File copying is far simplet than this. – user207421 Nov 6 '17 at 17:21
-1

Adding up on EJP's answer; use this for more fluidity. Make sure you don't put his code inside a bigger try catch with more code between the .read and the catch block, it may return an exception and jump all the way to the outer catch block, safest bet is to place EJPS's while loop inside a try catch, and then continue the code after it, like:

int count;
byte[] bytes = new byte[4096];
try {
    while ((count = is.read(bytes)) > 0) {
        System.out.println(count);
        bos.write(bytes, 0, count);
    }
} catch ( Exception e )
{
    //It will land here....
}
// Then continue from here

EDIT: ^This happened to me cuz I didn't realize you need to put socket.shutDownOutput() if it's a client-to-server stream!

Hope this post solves any of your issues

  • You don't need shutdownOutput(). Closing the socket has the same effect. If you get an IOException while copying, you do want to stop immediately. There is almost certainly nothing more you can do withhe socket except close it. – user207421 May 18 '18 at 8:17

protected by Community May 12 '15 at 0:46

Thank you for your interest in this question. Because it has attracted low-quality or spam answers that had to be removed, posting an answer now requires 10 reputation on this site (the association bonus does not count).

Would you like to answer one of these unanswered questions instead?

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.