73

I have two columns:

job_start                         job_end
2011-11-02 12:20:37.247           2011-11-02 13:35:14.613

How would it be possible using T-SQL to find the raw amount of time that has passed between when the job started and when the job ended?

I tried this:

select    (job_end - job_start) from tableA

but ended up with this:

1900-01-01 01:14:37.367
1
  • As you can see, the result of DateTime subtraction is another date, equal to 1900.01.01 plus the resulting difference, which in your case is 1:14:37.367.
    – Ant_222
    Jun 19, 2019 at 14:21

11 Answers 11

127

Take a look at the DateDiff() function.

-- Syntax
-- DATEDIFF ( datepart , startdate , enddate )

-- Example usage
SELECT DATEDIFF(DAY, GETDATE(), GETDATE() + 1) AS DayDiff
SELECT DATEDIFF(MINUTE, GETDATE(), GETDATE() + 1) AS MinuteDiff
SELECT DATEDIFF(SECOND, GETDATE(), GETDATE() + 1) AS SecondDiff
SELECT DATEDIFF(WEEK, GETDATE(), GETDATE() + 1) AS WeekDiff
SELECT DATEDIFF(HOUR, GETDATE(), GETDATE() + 1) AS HourDiff
...

You can see it in action / play with it here

19

You can use the DATEDIFF function to get the difference in minutes, seconds, days etc.

SELECT DATEDIFF(MINUTE,job_start,job_end)

MINUTE obviously returns the difference in minutes, you can also use DAY, HOUR, SECOND, YEAR (see the books online link for the full list).

If you want to get fancy you can show this differently for example 75 minutes could be displayed like this: 01:15:00:0

Here is the code to do that for both SQL Server 2005 and 2008

-- SQL Server 2005
SELECT CONVERT(VARCHAR(10),DATEADD(MINUTE,DATEDIFF(MINUTE,job_start,job_end),'2011-01-01 00:00:00.000'),114)

-- SQL Server 2008
SELECT CAST(DATEADD(MINUTE,DATEDIFF(MINUTE,job_start,job_end),'2011-01-01 00:00:00.000') AS TIME)
3
  • 1
    @JamesHill Thank you James, you sound like you need a holiday! So I upvoted your answer. Mar 1, 2012 at 18:25
  • @some_bloody_fool, (: thanks. You're probably right actually!
    – James Hill
    Mar 1, 2012 at 18:26
  • Ok Ive added another way for you to display it now if you choose to. Mar 1, 2012 at 18:29
13

Cast the result as TIME and the result will be in time format for duration of the interval.

select CAST(job_end - job_start) AS TIME(0)) from tableA
1
  • 2
    Wonderful, This is what i am exactly looking for.thanks !
    – hakuna
    Jul 27, 2016 at 16:45
5

I think you need the time gap between job_start & job_end.

Try this...

select SUBSTRING(CONVERT(VARCHAR(20),(job_end - job_start),120),12,8) from tableA

I ended up with this.

01:14:37
2

Declare the Start and End date DECLARE @SDATE AS DATETIME

TART_DATE  AS DATETIME
DECLARE @END_-- Set Start and End date
SET @START_DATE = GETDATE()
SET @END_DATE    = DATEADD(SECOND, 3910, GETDATE())

-- Get the Result in HH:MI:SS:MMM(24H) format SELECT CONVERT(VARCHAR(12), DATEADD(MS, DATEDIFF(MS, @START_DATE, @END_DATE), 0), 114) AS TimeDiff

0

Try this in Sql Server

SELECT 
      start_date as firstdate,end_date as seconddate
       ,cast(datediff(MI,start_date,end_date)as decimal(10,3)) as minutediff
      ,cast(cast(cast(datediff(MI,start_date,end_date)as decimal(10,3)) / (24*60) as int ) as varchar(10)) + ' ' + 'Days' + ' ' 
      + cast(cast((cast(datediff(MI,start_date,end_date)as decimal(10,3)) / (24*60) - 
        floor(cast(datediff(MI,start_date,end_date)as decimal(10,3)) / (24*60)) ) * 24 as int) as varchar(10)) + ':' 

     + cast( cast(((cast(datediff(MI,start_date,end_date)as decimal(10,3)) / (24*60) 
      - floor(cast(datediff(MI,start_date,end_date)as decimal(10,3)) / (24*60)))*24
        -
        cast(floor((cast(datediff(MI,start_date,end_date)as decimal(10,3)) / (24*60) 
      - floor(cast(datediff(MI,start_date,end_date)as decimal(10,3)) / (24*60)))*24) as decimal)) * 60 as int) as varchar(10))

    FROM [AdventureWorks2012].dbo.learndate
0

If your database StartTime = 07:00:00 and endtime = 14:00:00, and both are time type. Your query to get the time difference would be:

SELECT TIMEDIFF(Time(endtime ), Time(StartTime )) from tbl_name

If your database startDate = 2014-07-20 07:00:00 and endtime = 2014-07-20 23:00:00, you can also use this query.

1
  • What version of SQL Server supports TIMEDIFF function?
    – Alex
    Feb 21, 2019 at 9:06
0

Below code gives in hh:mm format.

select RIGHT(LEFT(job_end- job_start,17),5)

1
  • 1
    I think this is not exactly what the OP is asking for. USage of DATE_DIFF should help...
    – Tyron78
    Dec 4, 2017 at 7:24
0

Take a look at DATEDIFF, this should be what you're looking for. It takes the two dates you're comparing, and the date unit you want the difference in (days, months, seconds...)

0

I used following logic and it worked for me like marvel:

CONVERT(TIME, DATEADD(MINUTE, DATEDIFF(MINUTE, AP.Time_IN, AP.Time_OUT), 0)) 
0

If you trying to get worked hours with some accuracy, try this (tested in SQL Server 2016)

SELECT DATEDIFF(MINUTE,job_start, job_end)/60.00;

Various DATEDIFF functionalities are:

SELECT DATEDIFF(year,        '2005-12-31 23:59:59.9999999', '2006-01-01 00:00:00.0000000');
SELECT DATEDIFF(quarter,     '2005-12-31 23:59:59.9999999', '2006-01-01 00:00:00.0000000');
SELECT DATEDIFF(month,       '2005-12-31 23:59:59.9999999', '2006-01-01 00:00:00.0000000');
SELECT DATEDIFF(dayofyear,   '2005-12-31 23:59:59.9999999', '2006-01-01 00:00:00.0000000');
SELECT DATEDIFF(day,         '2005-12-31 23:59:59.9999999', '2006-01-01 00:00:00.0000000');
SELECT DATEDIFF(week,        '2005-12-31 23:59:59.9999999', '2006-01-01 00:00:00.0000000');
SELECT DATEDIFF(hour,        '2005-12-31 23:59:59.9999999', '2006-01-01 00:00:00.0000000');
SELECT DATEDIFF(minute,      '2005-12-31 23:59:59.9999999', '2006-01-01 00:00:00.0000000');
SELECT DATEDIFF(second,      '2005-12-31 23:59:59.9999999', '2006-01-01 00:00:00.0000000');
SELECT DATEDIFF(millisecond, '2005-12-31 23:59:59.9999999', '2006-01-01 00:00:00.0000000');

Ref: https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/sql/t-sql/functions/datediff-transact-sql?view=sql-server-2017

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