23

I have a label that shows the file name .. I had to set AutoSize of the label to False for designing.
So when the file name text got longer than label size.. it got cut like in the picture.

enter image description here

label1.Size = new Size(200, 32);
label1.AutoSize = false;

How do I re-size the text automatically to fit the label size, when the text is longer than the label size?

3
  • What do you expect to happen if the text becomes to long to display on the form?
    – M.Babcock
    Mar 2, 2012 at 5:04
  • Please set the tag for GUI framework, WinForms or asp.net or other.
    – brgerner
    Mar 2, 2012 at 9:39
  • 2
    @M.Babcock i expect it to get smaller so it can fit the label Mar 2, 2012 at 19:10

8 Answers 8

30

You can use my code snippet below. System needs some loops to calculate the label's font based on text size.

while(label1.Width < System.Windows.Forms.TextRenderer.MeasureText(label1.Text, 
     new Font(label1.Font.FontFamily, label1.Font.Size, label1.Font.Style)).Width)
{
    label1.Font = new Font(label1.Font.FontFamily, label1.Font.Size - 0.5f, label1.Font.Style);
}
2
  • 5
    You need to add code for when the label is larger and the font needs to increase in size. Jan 24, 2013 at 21:14
  • 2
    Looping is an inefficient way to find a good size. jwaliszko's answer or Andro72's answer avoid the looping, by measuring once and computing a ratio. I do like the use of TextRenderer.MeasureText, if a Graphics is not available. And it might be wise to do something like this after one of those other answers, in case the ratio calculation results in a slightly too large label. Aug 12, 2017 at 15:07
18

Label scaling

private void scaleFont(Label lab)
{
    Image fakeImage = new Bitmap(1, 1); //As we cannot use CreateGraphics() in a class library, so the fake image is used to load the Graphics.
    Graphics graphics = Graphics.FromImage(fakeImage);

    SizeF extent = graphics.MeasureString(lab.Text, lab.Font);

    float hRatio = lab.Height / extent.Height;
    float wRatio = lab.Width / extent.Width;
    float ratio = (hRatio < wRatio) ? hRatio : wRatio;

    float newSize = lab.Font.Size * ratio;

    lab.Font = new Font(lab.Font.FontFamily, newSize, lab.Font.Style);
}

TextRenderer Approach pointed out by @ToolmakerSteve in the comments

private void ScaleFont(Label lab)
{
    SizeF extent = TextRenderer.MeasureText(lab.Text, lab.Font);

    float hRatio = lab.Height / extent.Height;
    float wRatio = lab.Width / extent.Width;
    float ratio = (hRatio < wRatio) ? hRatio : wRatio;

    float newSize = lab.Font.Size * ratio;

    lab.Font = new Font(lab.Font.FontFamily, newSize, lab.Font.Style);
}
1
  • 3
    Could use Windows.Forms.TextRenderer.MeasureText; would not need fakeImage or graphics. Aug 12, 2017 at 14:48
7

Based on the article provided by @brgerner, I'll provide the alternative implementation here, as that one marked as an answer is not so efficient nor complete as this one below:

public class FontWizard
{
    public static Font FlexFont(Graphics g, float minFontSize, float maxFontSize, Size layoutSize, string s, Font f, out SizeF extent)
    {
        if (maxFontSize == minFontSize)
            f = new Font(f.FontFamily, minFontSize, f.Style);

        extent = g.MeasureString(s, f);

        if (maxFontSize <= minFontSize)
            return f;

        float hRatio = layoutSize.Height / extent.Height;
        float wRatio = layoutSize.Width / extent.Width;
        float ratio = (hRatio < wRatio) ? hRatio : wRatio;

        float newSize = f.Size * ratio;

        if (newSize < minFontSize)
            newSize = minFontSize;
        else if (newSize > maxFontSize)
            newSize = maxFontSize;

        f = new Font(f.FontFamily, newSize, f.Style);
        extent = g.MeasureString(s, f);

        return f;
    }

    public static void OnPaint(object sender, PaintEventArgs e, string text)
    {
        var control = sender as Control;
        if (control == null)
            return;

        control.Text = string.Empty;    //delete old stuff
        var rectangle = control.ClientRectangle;

        using (Font f = new System.Drawing.Font("Microsoft Sans Serif", 20.25f, FontStyle.Bold))
        {
            SizeF size;
            using (Font f2 = FontWizard.FlexFont(e.Graphics, 5, 50, rectangle.Size, text, f, out size))
            {
                PointF p = new PointF((rectangle.Width - size.Width) / 2, (rectangle.Height - size.Height) / 2);
                e.Graphics.DrawString(text, f2, Brushes.Black, p);
            }
        }
    }
}

and the usage:

val label = new Label();
label.Paint += (sender, e) => FontWizard.OnPaint(sender, e, text);
0

I use the following weighted scaling trick to provide a good fit, i.e. a weighted tradeoff is made between fitting the height and fitting the width. It's in VB .net, but I think you can translate to C# easily.

Function shrinkFontToFit(f As Font, text As String, requiredsize As SizeF) As Font
    Dim actualsize As SizeF = TextRenderer.MeasureText(text, f)
    Return New Font(f.FontFamily, f.Size * (requiredsize.Width + requiredsize.Height ) _
        / (actualsize.Width + actualsize.Height), f.Style, GraphicsUnit.Pixel)
End Function
1
  • Please explain when weighted scaling would be appropriate/useful. For the most common usage, the size must be shrunk until the text fits both dimensions; when would one instead want to use the approach here? Aug 12, 2017 at 14:58
0

With inspiration from @bnguyen82 i came up with something that works all the way.

public static void ScaleLabel(Label label, float stepSize = 0.5f)
{
    //decrease font size if text is wider or higher than label
    while (lblTextSize() is Size s && s.Width > label.Width || s.Height > label.Height)
    {
        label.Font = new Font(label.Font.FontFamily, label.Font.Size - stepSize, label.Font.Style);
    }

    //increase font size if label width is bigger than text size
    while (label.Width > lblTextSize().Width)
    {
        var font = new Font(label.Font.FontFamily, label.Font.Size + stepSize, label.Font.Style);
        var nextSize = TextRenderer.MeasureText(label.Text, font);

        //dont make text width or hight bigger than label
        if (nextSize.Width > label.Width || nextSize.Height > label.Height)
            break;

        label.Font = font;
    }

    Size lblTextSize() => TextRenderer.MeasureText(label.Text,
        new Font(label.Font.FontFamily, label.Font.Size, label.Font.Style));
}

PS: In order for this to work the label needs to have AutoSize = false and either to be docked or anchored.

0

this method worked for me

simply you will reduce font size until it reach the width you want.

while (label1.Width >150 )
{
    label1.Font = new Font(label1.Font.FontFamily, label1.Font.Size - 0.5f, label1.Font.Style);
}
0

First you need an event whenever text changes:

lbl.TextChanged += new EventHandler(Label_TextChanged);

Then you change the font inside the event to fit :

private void Label_TextChanged(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    Label lbl = (Label)sender;
    if (lbl.Image != null) return;
    using (Graphics cg = lbl.CreateGraphics())
    {
        SizeF lblsize = new SizeF(lbl.Width, lbl.Height);
        SizeF textsize = cg.MeasureString(lbl.Text, lbl.Font, lblsize);
        while (textsize.Width > lblsize.Width - (lblsize.Width * 0.1))
        {
            lbl.Font = new Font(lbl.Font.Name, lbl.Font.Size - 1, lbl.Font.Style);
            textsize = cg.MeasureString(lbl.Text, lbl.Font, lblsize);
            if (lbl.Font.Size < 6) break;
        }
    }
}

This way you have smaller fonts to fit. I skip when image is involved. I also stop to size 5. I shrink at intervals of -1. -0.5 will also work. I consider a 10% of control area as unusable 'border' - works well. This technique will work but do not expect results on large texts into small labels. If you do not have images you can use control instead of label and apply to buttons and textboxes as well.

-2

I think the easiest way could be to check the render size and if it is greater than the actual label size, decrease the fontsize of the label.

private void label3_Paint(object sender, PaintEventArgs e) {

        Size sz = TextRenderer.MeasureText(label1.Text, label1.Font, label1.Size, TextFormatFlags.WordBreak);

        if (sz.Width > label1.Size.Width || sz.Height > label1.Size.Height)
        {

            DecreaseFontSize(label1);

        }
    }

public void DecreaseFontSize(Label lbl) {

        lbl.Font = new System.Drawing.Font(lbl.Font.Name, lbl.Font.Size - 1, lbl.Font.Style);

    }
1
  • Did you read any of the already existing answers, to see if they do something similar?? [Hint: there are similar answers, and they do a better job, because they repeat the test until a fit is found, or even better, they estimate what size will fit after measuring once.] Aug 12, 2017 at 14:52

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