56

I'm working with the Azure REST API and they are using this to create the request body for table storage:

DateTime.UtcNow.ToString("o")

Which produces:

2012-03-02T04:07:34.0218628Z

It is called "round-trip" and apparently it's an ISO standard (see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ISO_8601) but I have no idea how to replicate it after reading the wiki article.

Does anyone know if Boost has support for this, or possibly Qt?

11 Answers 11

89

If the time to the nearest second is precise enough, you can use strftime:

#include <ctime>
#include <iostream>

int main() {
    time_t now;
    time(&now);
    char buf[sizeof "2011-10-08T07:07:09Z"];
    strftime(buf, sizeof buf, "%FT%TZ", gmtime(&now));
    // this will work too, if your compiler doesn't support %F or %T:
    //strftime(buf, sizeof buf, "%Y-%m-%dT%H:%M:%SZ", gmtime(&now));
    std::cout << buf << "\n";
}

If you need more precision, you can use Boost:

#include <iostream>
#include <boost/date_time/posix_time/posix_time.hpp>

int main() {
    using namespace boost::posix_time;
    ptime t = microsec_clock::universal_time();
    std::cout << to_iso_extended_string(t) << "Z\n";
}
1
  • %Y-%m-%dT%H:%M:%SZ is equivalent to %FT%TZ for those who still have to cope with a C++03 compiler
    – Kiruahxh
    Apr 7 at 7:59
45

Using the date library (C++11):

template <class Precision>
string getISOCurrentTimestamp()
{
    auto now = chrono::system_clock::now();
    return date::format("%FT%TZ", date::floor<Precision>(now));
}

Example usage:

cout << getISOCurrentTimestamp<chrono::seconds>();
cout << getISOCurrentTimestamp<chrono::milliseconds>();
cout << getISOCurrentTimestamp<chrono::microseconds>();

Output:

2017-04-28T15:07:37Z
2017-04-28T15:07:37.035Z
2017-04-28T15:07:37.035332Z
13

With C++20, time point formatting (to string) is available in the (chrono) standard library. https://en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/chrono/system_clock/formatter

#include <chrono>
#include <format>
#include <iostream>

int main()
{
   const auto now = std::chrono::system_clock::now();
   std::cout << std::format("{:%FT%TZ}", now) << '\n';
}

Output

2021-11-02T15:12:46.0173346Z

It works in Visual Studio 2019 with the latest C++ language version (/std:c++latest).

12

I should point out I am a C++ newb.

I needed string with a UTC ISO 8601 formatted date and time that included milliseconds. I did not have access to boost.

This is more of a hack than a solution, but it worked well enough for me.

std::string getTime()
{
    timeval curTime;
    gettimeofday(&curTime, NULL);

    int milli = curTime.tv_usec / 1000;
    char buf[sizeof "2011-10-08T07:07:09.000Z"];
    char *p = buf + strftime(buf, sizeof buf, "%FT%T", gmtime(&curTime.tv_sec));
    sprintf(p, ".%dZ", milli);

    return buf;
}

The output looks like: 2016-04-13T06:53:15.485Z

0
5

Boost has a library for this.

I.e. posix_time has the from_iso_string() and to_iso_string() functions.

3

In Qt, that would be:

QDateTime dt = QDateTime::currentDateTime();
dt.setTimeSpec(Qt::UTC);  // or Qt::OffsetFromUTC for offset from UTC
qDebug() << QDateTime::currentDateTime().toString(Qt::ISODate);
7
  • The numbers in the end is the issue, not the format of the string
    – chikuba
    Mar 4, 2012 at 20:13
  • You mean the fractional part of the seconds (i.e. .0218628)? They are optional... Mar 4, 2012 at 20:26
  • how? could not see anything in the doc
    – chikuba
    Mar 4, 2012 at 20:28
  • at en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ISO_8601#Times : "Decimal fractions may also be added..." Mar 5, 2012 at 13:33
  • Yeah, I fully aware of that. I just wonder how to do it using the Qt approach.
    – chikuba
    Mar 5, 2012 at 20:20
2

OK so I've modified a few solutions that I've found as came up with the following :

static QString getTimeZoneOffset()
{
    QDateTime dt1 = QDateTime::currentDateTime();
    QDateTime dt2 = dt1.toUTC();
    dt1.setTimeSpec(Qt::UTC);

int offset = dt2.secsTo(dt1) / 3600;
if (offset >= 0)
    return QString("%1").arg(offset).rightJustified(2, '0',true).prepend("+");
return QString("%1").arg(offset).rightJustified(2, '0',true);
}

Then to easily format a date ( yyyy-MM-dd'T'HH:mm:ss.SSSZ ) :

static QString toISO8601ExtendedFormat(QDateTime date)
{
    QString dateAsString = date.toString(Qt::ISODate);
    QString timeOffset =  Define::getTimeZoneOffset();
    qDebug() << "dateAsString :" << dateAsString;
    qDebug() << "timeOffset :" << timeOffset;
    timeOffset = QString(".000%1%2").arg(timeOffset).arg("00");
    qDebug() << "timeOffset replaced :" << timeOffset;
    if(dateAsString.contains("Z",Qt::CaseInsensitive))
        dateAsString = dateAsString.replace("Z",timeOffset);
    else
        dateAsString = dateAsString.append(timeOffset);
        qDebug() << "dateAsString :" << dateAsString;
    return dateAsString;
}

For example GMT +2 would look like this : 2013-10-14T00:00:00.000+0200

1

You can use this function which uses std::put_time with a std::ostringstream to generate the resulting std::string.

#include <iostream>
#include <chrono>
#include <iomanip>
#include <sstream>
/**
 * Generate a UTC ISO8601-formatted timestamp
 * and return as std::string
 */
std::string currentISO8601TimeUTC() {
  auto now = std::chrono::system_clock::now();
  auto itt = std::chrono::system_clock::to_time_t(now);
  std::ostringstream ss;
  ss << std::put_time(gmtime(&itt), "%FT%TZ");
  return ss.str();
}
// Usage example
int main() {
    std::cout << currentISO8601TimeUTC() << std::endl;
}

Reference: https://techoverflow.net/2018/03/30/iso8601-utc-time-as-stdstring-using-c11-chrono/

0

Tested in Visual C++, GNU C++, Emscripten

#include <ctime>
#include <chrono>
#include <iostream> 
#include <locale>  

#if defined (_WIN32) 
#define WINDOWSLIB 1
#elif defined (__APPLE__)//iOS, Mac OS
#define MACOSLIB 1
#elif defined (__LINUX__) || defined(__gnu_linux__) || defined(__linux__) || defined(__linux) || defined(linux)//_Ubuntu - Fedora - Centos - RedHat
#define LINUXLIB 1
#elif defined (__EMSCRIPTEN__)
#define EMSCRIPTENLIB 1
#endif

#define WriteLine(data)std::cout<< data <<std::endl;
typedef std::string String;

String CurrentISO8601DateTime(bool toUTC=true)
{
    using namespace std::chrono;
    system_clock::time_point now = system_clock::now();
    time_t timet = system_clock::to_time_t(now);
    std::tm tm{};
    String localeStr = setlocale(LC_ALL, nullptr);
    setlocale(LC_ALL, u8"");
    String format = String(u8"%FT%T.").append(std::to_string(duration_cast<milliseconds>(now.time_since_epoch()).count() % static_cast<long long>(1000)));
    if (toUTC)
    {
#ifdef WINDOWSLIB
        gmtime_s(&tm, &timet);
#elif LINUXLIB
        gmtime_r(&timet, &tm);
#elif EMSCRIPTENLIB
        gmtime_r(&timet, &tm);
#endif
        format = format.append(u8"Z");
    }
    else
    {
#ifdef WINDOWSLIB
        localtime_s(&tm, &timet);
#elif LINUXLIB
        localtime_r(&timet, &tm);
#elif EMSCRIPTENLIB
        localtime_r(&timet, &tm);
#endif
        format.append(u8"%z");
    }
    String result = String(255, 0);
    const size_t length = std::strftime(&result[0], result.size(), format.c_str(), &tm);
    result.resize(length);
    setlocale(LC_ALL, localeStr.c_str());
    return result;
}

#define ConsoleWriteLn(data) std::cout<< data <<std::endl;

int main()
{
    ConsoleWriteLn(u8"UTC  : " + CurrentISO8601DateTime());
    ConsoleWriteLn(u8"LOCAL: " + CurrentISO8601DateTime(false));
}


Results

UTC : 2020-04-12T17:00:18.632Z
LOCAL: 2020-04-12T12:00:18.633-0500

You can deserialize normally with Json.NET

0

You can get local or UTC time:

#include <ctime>
#include <iostream>

int main(){
    std::time_t time = std::time(0); // Get current time

    // Construct local time
    char loc[25];
    strftime(loc, sizeof(loc), "%FT%T%z", localtime(&time));

    // Construct UTC time 
    char utc[25];
    strftime(utc, sizeof(utc), "%FT%T%z", gmtime(&time));

    // Print local and UTC time
    std::cout << "Local time: " << loc << std::endl;
    std::cout << "UTC time: " << utc << std::endl;
    return 0;
}
1
  • You shouldn't suppend Z if it's not Zulu (UTC)
    – P i
    Jun 17 at 13:14
-1

Did it like this:

using namespace boost::posix_time;
ptime t = microsec_clock::universal_time();
qDebug() << QString::fromStdString(to_iso_extended_string(t) + "0Z"); // need 7 digits

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