8

i want to get some string, range from 0000 to 9999, that's to say, i want to print the following string:

0000
0001
0002
0003
0004
0005
0006
....
9999

i tried to use print "\n".join([str(num) for num in range(0, 9999)]), but failed, i get the following number:

0
1
2
3
4
5
6
...
9999

i want python to add the prefix 0 automatically, making the number remain 4 bit digits all the time. can anyone give a hand to me? any help appreciated.

1
  • 1
    You can't get a sequence ending in "9999" with range(0, 9999); Python ranges don't include the upper bound. Use range(10**4) if you want to include 9999.
    – DSM
    Mar 2, 2012 at 4:34

8 Answers 8

33

One way to get what you want is to use string formatting:

>>> for i in range(10):
...     '{0:04}'.format(i)
... 
'0000'
'0001'
'0002'
'0003'
'0004'
'0005'
'0006'
'0007'
'0008'
'0009'

So to do what you want, do this:

print("\n".join(['{0:04}'.format(num) for num in range(0, 10000)]))
7
  • No it is not a perfect solution. Major flaw there. If you are going to be using big ranges like 9999 then you should use xrange to avoid allocating the whole list of numbers. It may not make a big difference to do it once or twice, but what if that loop is inside another loop inside some recursive function calls? Mar 2, 2012 at 6:10
  • What Michael said plus remove [] (use gen exp instead of list comp).
    – yak
    Mar 2, 2012 at 6:14
  • @MichaelDillon, that's only true in Python 2. In Python 3, range == xrange and xrange is undefined. The OP used range, so I assumed that he's using Python 3.
    – senderle
    Mar 2, 2012 at 13:38
  • @yak, that's also depends on circumstances. Using a genex saves memory but is actually a bit slower in this case. On my machine, anyway.
    – senderle
    Mar 2, 2012 at 13:48
  • @senderle: The print statement that he used and you copied is a dead giveaway for Python 2, though. Jun 11, 2013 at 6:07
6

http://docs.python.org/library/stdtypes.html#str.zfill

Return the numeric string left filled with zeros in a string of length width. A sign prefix is handled correctly. The original string is returned if width is less than or equal to len(s).

E.g.:

>>> for i in range(10):
...   print('{:d}'.format(i).zfill(4))
... 
0000
0001
0002
0003
0004
0005
0006
0007
0008
0009
5

try this

print"\n".join(["%#04d" % num for num in range(0, 9999)])
5

Simply using str.rjust:

print "\n".join([str(num).rjust(4, '0') for num in range(0, 1000)])

Return the string right justified in a string of length width. Padding is done using the specified fillchar (default is an ASCII space). The original string is returned if width is less than or equal to len(s).

2

str.zfill also works:

print('\n'.join([str(num).zfill(4) for num in range(0, 10000)]))

1

another way to do that:

["%.4d" % i for i in range(0,999)]

or

["%04d" % i for i in range(0,999)]
0

This should do the trick of left-padding the string:

(lambda f: f(f))(lambda f: (lambda x: (x if len(x) == 4 else f(f)('0' + x))))(str(num))
0

You can try this:

for i in range(9999):
    print(str(i).zfill(4)+"\n")

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.