4376

Is there a shortcut to make a simple list out of a list of lists in Python?

I can do it in a for loop, but is there some cool "one-liner"?

I tried it with functools.reduce():

from functools import reduce
l = [[1, 2, 3], [4, 5, 6], [7], [8, 9]]
reduce(lambda x, y: x.extend(y), l)

But I get this error:

Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <lambda>
AttributeError: 'NoneType' object has no attribute 'extend'
5
  • 37
    There's an in-depth discussion of this here: rightfootin.blogspot.com/2006/09/more-on-python-flatten.html, discussing several methods of flattening arbitrarily nested lists of lists. An interesting read! Jun 4 '09 at 20:41
  • 9
    Some other answers are better but the reason yours fails is that the 'extend' method always returns None. For a list with length 2, it will work but return None. For a longer list, it will consume the first 2 args, which returns None. It then continues with None.extend(<third arg>), which causes this erro
    – mehtunguh
    Jun 11 '13 at 21:48
  • stackoverflow.com/questions/50259290/… (this article explain the difference between an np.flatten() and a tf.flatten() use (static vs dynamic) ndarray. Dec 18 '20 at 16:48
  • This is a very common duplicate target. However, for cases where OP already has a process that generates a list of lists (especially if it's a list comprehension), consider whether stackoverflow.com/questions/1077015/… is a more applicable duplicate. Nov 25 at 16:16
  • your lambda should be reduce(lambda a, b: a + b, l)
    – safhac
    15 hours ago

22 Answers 22

6212

Given a list of lists t,

flat_list = [item for sublist in t for item in sublist]

which means:

flat_list = []
for sublist in t:
    for item in sublist:
        flat_list.append(item)

is faster than the shortcuts posted so far. (t is the list to flatten.)

Here is the corresponding function:

def flatten(t):
    return [item for sublist in t for item in sublist]

As evidence, you can use the timeit module in the standard library:

$ python -mtimeit -s't=[[1,2,3],[4,5,6], [7], [8,9]]*99' '[item for sublist in t for item in sublist]'
10000 loops, best of 3: 143 usec per loop
$ python -mtimeit -s't=[[1,2,3],[4,5,6], [7], [8,9]]*99' 'sum(t, [])'
1000 loops, best of 3: 969 usec per loop
$ python -mtimeit -s't=[[1,2,3],[4,5,6], [7], [8,9]]*99' 'reduce(lambda x,y: x+y,t)'
1000 loops, best of 3: 1.1 msec per loop

Explanation: the shortcuts based on + (including the implied use in sum) are, of necessity, O(T**2) when there are T sublists -- as the intermediate result list keeps getting longer, at each step a new intermediate result list object gets allocated, and all the items in the previous intermediate result must be copied over (as well as a few new ones added at the end). So, for simplicity and without actual loss of generality, say you have T sublists of k items each: the first k items are copied back and forth T-1 times, the second k items T-2 times, and so on; total number of copies is k times the sum of x for x from 1 to T excluded, i.e., k * (T**2)/2.

The list comprehension just generates one list, once, and copies each item over (from its original place of residence to the result list) also exactly once.

6
  • 575
    I tried a test with the same data, using itertools.chain.from_iterable : $ python -mtimeit -s'from itertools import chain; l=[[1,2,3],[4,5,6], [7], [8,9]]*99' 'list(chain.from_iterable(l))'. It runs a bit more than twice as fast as the nested list comprehension that's the fastest of the alternatives shown here.
    – intuited
    Oct 15 '10 at 1:21
  • 326
    I found the syntax hard to understand until I realized you can think of it exactly like nested for loops. for sublist in l: for item in sublist: yield item Jul 27 '11 at 16:43
  • 211
    [leaf for tree in forest for leaf in tree] might be easier to comprehend and apply.
    – John Mee
    Aug 29 '13 at 1:38
  • 10
    @RobCrowell Same here. To me the list comprehension one doesn't read right, something feels off about it - I always seem to get it wrong and end up googling. To me this reads right [leaf for leaf in tree for tree in forest]. I wish this is how it was. I am sure I am missing something about the grammar here, and I would appreciate if anyone could point that out. Jul 12 at 17:19
  • 11
    I kept looking here every time I wanted to flatten a list, but this gif is what drove it home: i.stack.imgur.com/0GoV5.gif
    – Gilthans
    Aug 11 at 12:04
1959

You can use itertools.chain():

import itertools

list2d = [[1,2,3], [4,5,6], [7], [8,9]]
merged = list(itertools.chain(*list2d))

Or you can use itertools.chain.from_iterable() which doesn't require unpacking the list with the * operator:

merged = list(itertools.chain.from_iterable(list2d))
4
  • 18
    The * is the tricky thing that makes chain less straightforward than the list comprehension. You have to know that chain only joins together the iterables passed as parameters, and the * causes the top-level list to be expanded into parameters, so chain joins together all those iterables, but doesn't descend further. I think this makes the comprehension more readable than the use of chain in this case.
    – Tim Dierks
    Sep 3 '14 at 14:13
  • 97
    @TimDierks: I'm not sure "this requires you to understand Python syntax" is an argument against using a given technique in Python. Sure, complex usage could confuse, but the "splat" operator is generally useful in many circumstances, and this isn't using it in a particularly obscure way; rejecting all language features that aren't necessarily obvious to beginning users means you're tying one hand behind your back. May as well throw out list comprehensions too while you're at it; users from other backgrounds would find a for loop that repeatedly appends more obvious. Nov 12 '15 at 20:26
  • * creates an intermediary tuple.! from_iterable fetch the nested lists directly from the top list.
    – nadapez
    Oct 21 at 3:35
  • To make this more readable, you can make a simple function: def flatten_list(deep_list: list[list[object]]): return list(chain.from_iterable(deep_list)). The type hinting improves the clarity of what's going on (modern IDEs would interpret this as returning a list[object] type). Oct 25 at 14:34
1139

Note from the author: This is inefficient. But fun, because monoids are awesome. It's not appropriate for production Python code.

>>> l = [[1, 2, 3], [4, 5, 6], [7], [8, 9]]
>>> sum(l, [])
[1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9]

This just sums the elements of iterable passed in the first argument, treating second argument as the initial value of the sum (if not given, 0 is used instead and this case will give you an error).

Because you are summing nested lists, you actually get [1,3]+[2,4] as a result of sum([[1,3],[2,4]],[]), which is equal to [1,3,2,4].

Note that only works on lists of lists. For lists of lists of lists, you'll need another solution.

6
  • 125
    that's pretty neat and clever but I wouldn't use it because it's confusing to read.
    – andrewrk
    Jun 15 '10 at 18:55
  • 98
    This is a Shlemiel the painter's algorithm joelonsoftware.com/articles/fog0000000319.html -- unnecessarily inefficient as well as unnecessarily ugly. Apr 25 '12 at 18:24
  • 52
    The append operation on lists forms a Monoid, which is one of the most convenient abstractions for thinking of a + operation in a general sense (not limited to numbers only). So this answer deserves a +1 from me for (correct) treatment of lists as a monoid. The performance is concerning though...
    – ulidtko
    Dec 3 '14 at 10:35
  • 13
    this is a very inefficient way because of the quadratic aspect of the sum. Jul 31 '17 at 18:04
  • 5
    This article explains the maths of the inefficiency mathieularose.com/how-not-to-flatten-a-list-of-lists-in-python
    – ds4940
    Jan 4 '18 at 16:46
722

I tested most suggested solutions with perfplot (a pet project of mine, essentially a wrapper around timeit), and found

import functools
import operator
functools.reduce(operator.iconcat, a, [])

to be the fastest solution, both when many small lists and few long lists are concatenated. (operator.iadd is equally fast.)

A simpler and also acceptable variant is

out = []
for sublist in a:
    out.extend(sublist)

If the number of sublists is large, this performs a little worse than the above suggestion.

enter image description here

enter image description here


Code to reproduce the plot:

import functools
import itertools
import operator

import numpy as np
import perfplot


def forfor(a):
    return [item for sublist in a for item in sublist]


def sum_brackets(a):
    return sum(a, [])


def functools_reduce(a):
    return functools.reduce(operator.concat, a)


def functools_reduce_iconcat(a):
    return functools.reduce(operator.iconcat, a, [])


def itertools_chain(a):
    return list(itertools.chain.from_iterable(a))


def numpy_flat(a):
    return list(np.array(a).flat)


def numpy_concatenate(a):
    return list(np.concatenate(a))


def extend(a):
    out = []
    for sublist in a:
        out.extend(sublist)
    return out


b = perfplot.bench(
    setup=lambda n: [list(range(10))] * n,
    # setup=lambda n: [list(range(n))] * 10,
    kernels=[
        forfor,
        sum_brackets,
        functools_reduce,
        functools_reduce_iconcat,
        itertools_chain,
        numpy_flat,
        numpy_concatenate,
        extend,
    ],
    n_range=[2 ** k for k in range(16)],
    xlabel="num lists (of length 10)",
    # xlabel="len lists (10 lists total)"
)
b.save("out.png")
b.show()
6
  • 42
    For huge nested lists,' list(numpy.array(a).flat)' is the fastest among all functions above.
    – Sara
    Jan 20 '19 at 13:57
  • Is there a way to do a 3-d perfplot? number of arrays by average size of array?
    – Leo
    Apr 30 '20 at 0:31
  • @Sara can you define "huge" please?
    – Boris
    Nov 14 '20 at 6:05
  • 1
    Tried numpy_flat on the test example from Rossetta Code (link) and got VisibleDeprecationWarning: Creating an ndarray from ragged nested sequences (which is a list-or-tuple of lists-or-tuples-or ndarrays with different lengths or shapes) is deprecated. If you meant to do this, you must specify 'dtype=object' when creating the ndarray
    – mirekphd
    Dec 5 '20 at 11:08
  • 1
    One option missed above which shows up faster for my particular case i just items = []; for sublist in a: items.extend(sublist); return sublist Oct 11 at 17:05
248
>>> from functools import reduce
>>> l = [[1,2,3], [4,5,6], [7], [8,9]]
>>> reduce(lambda x, y: x+y, l)
[1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9]

The extend() method in your example modifies x instead of returning a useful value (which functools.reduce() expects).

A faster way to do the reduce version would be

>>> import operator
>>> l = [[1,2,3], [4,5,6], [7], [8,9]]
>>> reduce(operator.concat, l)
[1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9]
0
147

Here is a general approach that applies to numbers, strings, nested lists and mixed containers. This can flatten both simple and complicated containers (see also Demo).

Code

from typing import Iterable 
#from collections import Iterable                            # < py38


def flatten(items):
    """Yield items from any nested iterable; see Reference."""
    for x in items:
        if isinstance(x, Iterable) and not isinstance(x, (str, bytes)):
            for sub_x in flatten(x):
                yield sub_x
        else:
            yield x

Notes:

  • In Python 3, yield from flatten(x) can replace for sub_x in flatten(x): yield sub_x
  • In Python 3.8, abstract base classes are moved from collection.abc to the typing module.

Demo

simple = [[1, 2, 3], [4, 5, 6], [7], [8, 9]]
list(flatten(simple))
# [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9]

complicated = [[1, [2]], (3, 4, {5, 6}, 7), 8, "9"]              # numbers, strs, nested & mixed
list(flatten(complicated))
# [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, '9']

Reference

  • This solution is modified from a recipe in Beazley, D. and B. Jones. Recipe 4.14, Python Cookbook 3rd Ed., O'Reilly Media Inc. Sebastopol, CA: 2013.
  • Found an earlier SO post, possibly the original demonstration.
8
  • 6
    I just wrote pretty much the same, because I didn't see your solution ... here is what I looked for "recursively flatten complete multiple lists" ... (+1) Mar 25 '17 at 15:32
  • 3
    @MartinThoma Much appreciated. FYI, if flattening nested iterables is a common practice for you, there are some third-party packages that handle this well. This may save from reinventing the wheel. I've mentioned more_itertools among others discussed in this post. Cheers.
    – pylang
    Mar 25 '17 at 17:51
  • Maybe traverse could also be a good name for this way of a tree, whereas I'd keep it less universal for this answer by sticking to nested lists.
    – Wolf
    Jun 15 '17 at 10:22
  • You can check if hasattr(x, '__iter__') instead of importing/checking against Iterable and that will exclude strings as well.
    – Ryan Allen
    Apr 30 '18 at 16:46
  • the above code doesnt seem to work for if one of the nested lists is having a list of strings. [1, 2, [3, 4], [4], [], 9, 9.5, 'ssssss', ['str', 'sss', 'ss'], [3, 4, 5]] output:- [1, 2, 3, 4, 4, 9, 9.5, 'ssssss', 3, 4, 5]
    – sunnyX
    Jun 12 '19 at 21:35
77

If you want to flatten a data-structure where you don't know how deep it's nested you could use iteration_utilities.deepflatten1

>>> from iteration_utilities import deepflatten

>>> l = [[1, 2, 3], [4, 5, 6], [7], [8, 9]]
>>> list(deepflatten(l, depth=1))
[1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9]

>>> l = [[1, 2, 3], [4, [5, 6]], 7, [8, 9]]
>>> list(deepflatten(l))
[1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9]

It's a generator so you need to cast the result to a list or explicitly iterate over it.


To flatten only one level and if each of the items is itself iterable you can also use iteration_utilities.flatten which itself is just a thin wrapper around itertools.chain.from_iterable:

>>> from iteration_utilities import flatten
>>> l = [[1, 2, 3], [4, 5, 6], [7], [8, 9]]
>>> list(flatten(l))
[1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9]

Just to add some timings (based on Nico Schlömer's answer that didn't include the function presented in this answer):

Enter image description here

It's a log-log plot to accommodate for the huge range of values spanned. For qualitative reasoning: Lower is better.

The results show that if the iterable contains only a few inner iterables then sum will be fastest, however for long iterables only the itertools.chain.from_iterable, iteration_utilities.deepflatten or the nested comprehension have reasonable performance with itertools.chain.from_iterable being the fastest (as already noticed by Nico Schlömer).

from itertools import chain
from functools import reduce
from collections import Iterable  # or from collections.abc import Iterable
import operator
from iteration_utilities import deepflatten

def nested_list_comprehension(lsts):
    return [item for sublist in lsts for item in sublist]

def itertools_chain_from_iterable(lsts):
    return list(chain.from_iterable(lsts))

def pythons_sum(lsts):
    return sum(lsts, [])

def reduce_add(lsts):
    return reduce(lambda x, y: x + y, lsts)

def pylangs_flatten(lsts):
    return list(flatten(lsts))

def flatten(items):
    """Yield items from any nested iterable; see REF."""
    for x in items:
        if isinstance(x, Iterable) and not isinstance(x, (str, bytes)):
            yield from flatten(x)
        else:
            yield x

def reduce_concat(lsts):
    return reduce(operator.concat, lsts)

def iteration_utilities_deepflatten(lsts):
    return list(deepflatten(lsts, depth=1))


from simple_benchmark import benchmark

b = benchmark(
    [nested_list_comprehension, itertools_chain_from_iterable, pythons_sum, reduce_add,
     pylangs_flatten, reduce_concat, iteration_utilities_deepflatten],
    arguments={2**i: [[0]*5]*(2**i) for i in range(1, 13)},
    argument_name='number of inner lists'
)

b.plot()

1 Disclaimer: I'm the author of that library

0
36

Consider installing the more_itertools package.

> pip install more_itertools

It ships with an implementation for flatten (source, from the itertools recipes):

import more_itertools


lst = [[1, 2, 3], [4, 5, 6], [7], [8, 9]]
list(more_itertools.flatten(lst))
# [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9]

Note: as mentioned in the docs, flatten requires a list of lists. See below on flattening more irregular inputs.


As of version 2.4, you can flatten more complicated, nested iterables with more_itertools.collapse (source, contributed by abarnet).

lst = [[1, 2, 3], [4, 5, 6], [7], [8, 9]]
list(more_itertools.collapse(lst)) 
# [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9]

lst = [[1, 2, 3], [[4, 5, 6]], [[[7]]], 8, 9]              # complex nesting
list(more_itertools.collapse(lst))
# [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9]
3
  • If you can afford adding a package to your project - this answer is best
    – viddik13
    Mar 5 '20 at 15:53
  • it fails when all elements are not list. (e.g. lst=[1, [2,3]]). of course integer is not iterable.
    – Sajad.sni
    Sep 8 '20 at 8:32
  • also, mind that list of strings will be flattened to a list of characters
    – viddik13
    Oct 30 '20 at 2:05
30

The reason your function didn't work is because the extend extends an array in-place and doesn't return it. You can still return x from lambda, using something like this:

reduce(lambda x,y: x.extend(y) or x, l)

Note: extend is more efficient than + on lists.

2
  • 8
    extend is better used as newlist = [], extend = newlist.extend, for sublist in l: extend(l) as it avoids the (rather large) overhead of the lambda, the attribute lookup on x, and the or.
    – agf
    Sep 24 '11 at 10:12
  • for python 3 add from functools import reduce Jul 2 '19 at 12:24
24

The following seems simplest to me:

>>> import numpy as np
>>> l = [[1, 2, 3], [4, 5, 6], [7], [8, 9]]
>>> print (np.concatenate(l))
[1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9]
1
  • OP doesn't mention they want to use numpy. Python has good ways of doing this without relying on a library
    – kylebebak
    Oct 3 at 1:01
18

matplotlib.cbook.flatten() will work for nested lists even if they nest more deeply than the example.

import matplotlib
l = [[1, 2, 3], [4, 5, 6], [7], [8, 9]]
print(list(matplotlib.cbook.flatten(l)))
l2 = [[1, 2, 3], [4, 5, 6], [7], [8, [9, 10, [11, 12, [13]]]]]
print list(matplotlib.cbook.flatten(l2))

Result:

[1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9]
[1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13]

This is 18x faster than underscore._.flatten:

Average time over 1000 trials of matplotlib.cbook.flatten: 2.55e-05 sec
Average time over 1000 trials of underscore._.flatten: 4.63e-04 sec
(time for underscore._)/(time for matplotlib.cbook) = 18.1233394636
1
  • I think this is the fast of above all functions
    – abdul
    Sep 8 at 14:33
14

One can also use NumPy's flat:

import numpy as np
list(np.array(l).flat)

It only works when sublists have identical dimensions.

0
8

you can use list extend method, it shows to be the fastest:

flat_list = []
for sublist in l:
    flat_list.extend(sublist)

performance:

import functools
import itertools
import numpy
import operator
import perfplot



def functools_reduce_iconcat(a):
    return functools.reduce(operator.iconcat, a, [])


def itertools_chain(a):
    return list(itertools.chain.from_iterable(a))


def numpy_flat(a):
    return list(numpy.array(a).flat)


def extend(a):
    n = []

    list(map(n.extend, a))

    return n 


perfplot.show(
    setup=lambda n: [list(range(10))] * n,
    kernels=[
        functools_reduce_iconcat, extend,itertools_chain, numpy_flat
        ],
    n_range=[2**k for k in range(16)],
    xlabel='num lists',
    )

output: enter image description here

0
7

There are several answers with the same recursive appending scheme as below, but none makes use of try, which makes the solution more robust and Pythonic.

def flatten(itr):
    for x in itr:
        try:
            yield from flatten(x)
        except TypeError:
            yield x

Usage: this is a generator, you typically want to enclose it in an iterable builder like list() or tuple() or use it in a for loop.

Advantages of this solution are:

  • works with any kind of iterable (even future ones!)
  • works with any combination and deepness of nesting
  • works also if top level contains bare items
  • no dependencies
  • efficient (you can flatten the nested iterable partially, without wasting time on the remaining part you don't need)
  • versatile (you can use it to build an iterable of your choice or in a loop)

N.B. since ALL iterables are flattened, strings are decomposed into sequences of single characters. If you don't like/want such behavior, you can use the following version which filters out from flattening iterables like strings and bytes:

def flatten(itr):
    if type(itr) in (str,bytes):
        yield itr
    else:
        for x in itr:
            try:
                yield from flatten(x)
            except TypeError:
                yield x
3
  • why would you use a tuple? now your solution is inefficient. Jul 31 at 18:53
  • And with any sequence, sum((flatten(e) for e in itr), tuple()) is highly inefficient, Jul 31 at 18:53
  • @juanpa.arrivillaga Your comment made me think about improving my answer and I think I found a better one, what do you think?
    – mmj
    Aug 1 at 17:37
6

If you are willing to give up a tiny amount of speed for a cleaner look, then you could use numpy.concatenate().tolist() or numpy.concatenate().ravel().tolist():

import numpy

l = [[1, 2, 3], [4, 5, 6], [7], [8, 9]] * 99

%timeit numpy.concatenate(l).ravel().tolist()
1000 loops, best of 3: 313 µs per loop

%timeit numpy.concatenate(l).tolist()
1000 loops, best of 3: 312 µs per loop

%timeit [item for sublist in l for item in sublist]
1000 loops, best of 3: 31.5 µs per loop

You can find out more here in the documentation, numpy.concatenate and numpy.ravel.

3
  • 1
    Doesn't work for unevenly nested lists like [1, 2, [3], [[4]], [5, [6]]]
    – EL_DON
    Apr 22 '19 at 21:39
  • @EL_DON of course, that isn't what this question is asking, there is another question that deals with that case Jul 31 at 18:54
  • @juanpa.arrivillaga it's a simple and natural extension of the question, though. Answers that can handle greater depth of nesting are more likely to be useful to someone who finds this question.
    – EL_DON
    Aug 2 at 19:53
5
def flatten(alist):
    if alist == []:
        return []
    elif type(alist) is not list:
        return [alist]
    else:
        return flatten(alist[0]) + flatten(alist[1:])
1
  • Fails for python2.7 for the example nested list in the question: [[1, 2, 3], [4, 5, 6], [7], [8, 9]]
    – EL_DON
    Apr 22 '19 at 21:34
5

Note: Below applies to Python 3.3+ because it uses yield_from. six is also a third-party package, though it is stable. Alternately, you could use sys.version.


In the case of obj = [[1, 2,], [3, 4], [5, 6]], all of the solutions here are good, including list comprehension and itertools.chain.from_iterable.

However, consider this slightly more complex case:

>>> obj = [[1, 2, 3], [4, 5], 6, 'abc', [7], [8, [9, 10]]]

There are several problems here:

  • One element, 6, is just a scalar; it's not iterable, so the above routes will fail here.
  • One element, 'abc', is technically iterable (all strs are). However, reading between the lines a bit, you don't want to treat it as such--you want to treat it as a single element.
  • The final element, [8, [9, 10]] is itself a nested iterable. Basic list comprehension and chain.from_iterable only extract "1 level down."

You can remedy this as follows:

>>> from collections import Iterable
>>> from six import string_types

>>> def flatten(obj):
...     for i in obj:
...         if isinstance(i, Iterable) and not isinstance(i, string_types):
...             yield from flatten(i)
...         else:
...             yield i


>>> list(flatten(obj))
[1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 'abc', 7, 8, 9, 10]

Here, you check that the sub-element (1) is iterable with Iterable, an ABC from itertools, but also want to ensure that (2) the element is not "string-like."

1
  • 1
    If you are still interested in Python 2 compatibility, change yield from to a for loop, e.g. for x in flatten(i): yield x
    – pylang
    Jun 19 '18 at 19:06
4

This may not be the most efficient way but I thought to put a one-liner (actually a two-liner). Both versions will work on arbitrary hierarchy nested lists, and exploits language features (Python3.5) and recursion.

def make_list_flat (l):
    flist = []
    flist.extend ([l]) if (type (l) is not list) else [flist.extend (make_list_flat (e)) for e in l]
    return flist

a = [[1, 2], [[[[3, 4, 5], 6]]], 7, [8, [9, [10, 11], 12, [13, 14, [15, [[16, 17], 18]]]]]]
flist = make_list_flat(a)
print (flist)

The output is

[1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18]

This works in a depth first manner. The recursion goes down until it finds a non-list element, then extends the local variable flist and then rolls back it to the parent. Whenever flist is returned, it is extended to the parent's flist in the list comprehension. Therefore, at the root, a flat list is returned.

The above one creates several local lists and returns them which are used to extend the parent's list. I think the way around for this may be creating a gloabl flist, like below.

a = [[1, 2], [[[[3, 4, 5], 6]]], 7, [8, [9, [10, 11], 12, [13, 14, [15, [[16, 17], 18]]]]]]
flist = []
def make_list_flat (l):
    flist.extend ([l]) if (type (l) is not list) else [make_list_flat (e) for e in l]

make_list_flat(a)
print (flist)

The output is again

[1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18]

Although I am not sure at this time about the efficiency.

1
  • 1
    Why extend([l]) instead of append(l)?
    – Maciek
    Apr 9 '20 at 18:31
2

Another unusual approach that works for hetero- and homogeneous lists of integers:

from typing import List


def flatten(l: list) -> List[int]:
    """Flatten an arbitrary deep nested list of lists of integers.

    Examples:
        >>> flatten([1, 2, [1, [10]]])
        [1, 2, 1, 10]

    Args:
        l: Union[l, Union[int, List[int]]

    Returns:
        Flatted list of integer
    """
    return [int(i.strip('[ ]')) for i in str(l).split(',')]
7
  • That's just a more complicated and a bit slower way of what ᴡʜᴀᴄᴋᴀᴍᴀᴅᴏᴏᴅʟᴇ3000 already posted before. I reinvented his proposal yesterday, so this approach seems quite popular these days ;)
    – Darkonaut
    Jan 10 '18 at 22:03
  • Not quite: wierd_list = [[1, 2, 3], [4, 5, 6], [7], [8, 9], 10] >> nice_list=[1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 1, 0]
    – tharndt
    Jan 11 '18 at 8:17
  • my code as one liner would be : flat_list = [int(e.replace('[','').replace(']','')) for e in str(deep_list).split(',')]
    – tharndt
    Jan 11 '18 at 8:32
  • 1
    You are indeed right +1, ᴡʜᴀᴄᴋᴀᴍᴀᴅᴏᴏᴅʟᴇ3000's proposal won't work with multiple digit numbers, I also didn't test this before although it should be obvious. You could simplify your code and write [int(e.strip('[ ]')) for e in str(deep_list).split(',')]. But I'd suggest to stick with Deleet's proposal for real use cases. It doesn't contain hacky type transformations, it's faster and more versatile because it naturally also handles lists with mixed types.
    – Darkonaut
    Jan 11 '18 at 16:31
  • 2
    Unfortunately no. But I saw this code recently here: Python Practice Book 6.1.2
    – tharndt
    Jan 15 '18 at 8:18
2

I wanted a solution which can deal with multiple nesting ([[1], [[[2]], [3]]], [1, 2, 3] for example), but would also not be recursive (I had a big level of recursion and I got a recursion error.

This is what I came up with:

def _flatten(l) -> Iterator[Any]:
    stack = l.copy()
    while stack:
        item = stack.pop()
        if isinstance(item, list):
            stack.extend(item)
        else:
            yield item


def flatten(l) -> Iterator[Any]:
    return reversed(list(_flatten(l)))

and tests:

@pytest.mark.parametrize('input_list, expected_output', [
    ([1, 2, 3], [1, 2, 3]),
    ([[1], 2, 3], [1, 2, 3]),
    ([[1], [2], 3], [1, 2, 3]),
    ([[1], [2], [3]], [1, 2, 3]),
    ([[1], [[2]], [3]], [1, 2, 3]),
    ([[1], [[[2]], [3]]], [1, 2, 3]),
])
def test_flatten(input_list, expected_output):
    assert list(flatten(input_list)) == expected_output
0

You can use the following:

def flatlst(lista):
    listaplana = []
    for k in lista: listaplana = listaplana + k
    return listaplana
1
  • + operator creates a new list each time. You'll be better off using += or .extend()
    – Vimanyu
    Nov 26 at 1:35
-3
np.hstack(listoflist).tolist()
1
  • While this code may answer the question, providing additional context regarding why and/or how this code answers the question improves its long-term value. Consider reading How to Answer and edit your answer to improve it. Nov 6 '20 at 19:31

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