I wonder whether there is a shortcut to make a simple list out of list of lists in Python.

I can do that in a for loop, but maybe there is some cool "one-liner"? I tried it with reduce, but I get an error.

Code

l = [[1, 2, 3], [4, 5, 6], [7], [8, 9]]
reduce(lambda x, y: x.extend(y), l)

Error message

Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <lambda>
AttributeError: 'NoneType' object has no attribute 'extend'
  • 11
    There's an in-depth discussion of this here: rightfootin.blogspot.com/2006/09/more-on-python-flatten.html, discussing several methods of flattening arbitrarily nested lists of lists. An interesting read! – RichieHindle Jun 4 '09 at 20:41
  • 4
    Some other answers are better but the reason yours fails is that the 'extend' method always returns None. For a list with length 2, it will work but return None. For a longer list, it will consume the first 2 args, which returns None. It then continues with None.extend(<third arg>), which causes this erro – mehtunguh Jun 11 '13 at 21:48
  • @shawn-chin solution is the more pythonic here, but if you need to preserve the sequence type, say you have a tuple of tuples rather than a list of lists, then you should use reduce(operator.concat, tuple_of_tuples). Using operator.concat with tuples seems to perform faster than chain.from_iterables with list. – Meitham Oct 6 '14 at 21:46
  • numpy.array([[1],[2]]).flatten().tolist(), which removes the inner structure and returns the list [1,2] – user5920660 Sep 10 '17 at 17:37
  • Now supported by mpu: import mpu; mpu.datastructures.flatten([1, [2, 3], [4, [5, 6]]]) gives [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6] – Martin Thoma May 18 at 5:42

37 Answers 37

up vote 3325 down vote accepted
flat_list = [item for sublist in l for item in sublist]

which means:

for sublist in l:
    for item in sublist:
        flat_list.append(item)

is faster than the shortcuts posted so far. (l is the list to flatten.)

Here is a the corresponding function:

flatten = lambda l: [item for sublist in l for item in sublist]

For evidence, as always, you can use the timeit module in the standard library:

$ python -mtimeit -s'l=[[1,2,3],[4,5,6], [7], [8,9]]*99' '[item for sublist in l for item in sublist]'
10000 loops, best of 3: 143 usec per loop
$ python -mtimeit -s'l=[[1,2,3],[4,5,6], [7], [8,9]]*99' 'sum(l, [])'
1000 loops, best of 3: 969 usec per loop
$ python -mtimeit -s'l=[[1,2,3],[4,5,6], [7], [8,9]]*99' 'reduce(lambda x,y: x+y,l)'
1000 loops, best of 3: 1.1 msec per loop

Explanation: the shortcuts based on + (including the implied use in sum) are, of necessity, O(L**2) when there are L sublists -- as the intermediate result list keeps getting longer, at each step a new intermediate result list object gets allocated, and all the items in the previous intermediate result must be copied over (as well as a few new ones added at the end). So (for simplicity and without actual loss of generality) say you have L sublists of I items each: the first I items are copied back and forth L-1 times, the second I items L-2 times, and so on; total number of copies is I times the sum of x for x from 1 to L excluded, i.e., I * (L**2)/2.

The list comprehension just generates one list, once, and copies each item over (from its original place of residence to the result list) also exactly once.

  • 377
    I tried a test with the same data, using itertools.chain.from_iterable : $ python -mtimeit -s'from itertools import chain; l=[[1,2,3],[4,5,6], [7], [8,9]]*99' 'list(chain.from_iterable(l))'. It runs a bit more than twice as fast as the nested list comprehension that's the fastest of the alternatives shown here. – intuited Oct 15 '10 at 1:21
  • 221
    I found the syntax hard to understand until I realized you can think of it exactly like nested for loops. for sublist in l: for item in sublist: yield item – Rob Crowell Jul 27 '11 at 16:43
  • 20
    @BorisChervenkov: Notice that I wrapped the call in list() to realize the iterator into a list. – intuited May 20 '12 at 22:56
  • 121
    [leaf for tree in forest for leaf in tree] might be easier to comprehend and apply. – John Mee Aug 29 '13 at 1:38
  • 56
    @Joel, actually nowadays list(itertools.chain.from_iterable(l)) is best -- as noticed in other comments and Shawn's answer. – Alex Martelli Jan 4 '15 at 15:40

You can use itertools.chain():

>>> import itertools
>>> list2d = [[1,2,3],[4,5,6], [7], [8,9]]
>>> merged = list(itertools.chain(*list2d))

or, on Python >=2.6, use itertools.chain.from_iterable() which doesn't require unpacking the list:

>>> import itertools
>>> list2d = [[1,2,3],[4,5,6], [7], [8,9]]
>>> merged = list(itertools.chain.from_iterable(list2d))

This approach is arguably more readable than [item for sublist in l for item in sublist] and appears to be faster too:

[me@home]$ python -mtimeit -s'l=[[1,2,3],[4,5,6], [7], [8,9]]*99;import itertools' 'list(itertools.chain.from_iterable(l))'
10000 loops, best of 3: 24.2 usec per loop
[me@home]$ python -mtimeit -s'l=[[1,2,3],[4,5,6], [7], [8,9]]*99' '[item for sublist in l for item in sublist]'
10000 loops, best of 3: 45.2 usec per loop
[me@home]$ python -mtimeit -s'l=[[1,2,3],[4,5,6], [7], [8,9]]*99' 'sum(l, [])'
1000 loops, best of 3: 488 usec per loop
[me@home]$ python -mtimeit -s'l=[[1,2,3],[4,5,6], [7], [8,9]]*99' 'reduce(lambda x,y: x+y,l)'
1000 loops, best of 3: 522 usec per loop
[me@home]$ python --version
Python 2.7.3
  • 12
    @ShawnChin BTW, piece of hardware you had when answering this question, my current workstation is half as fast and is been 4 years. – MGP Sep 24 '13 at 15:18
  • 6
    The * is the tricky thing that makes chain less straightforward than the list comprehension. You have to know that chain only joins together the iterables passed as parameters, and the * causes the top-level list to be expanded into parameters, so chain joins together all those iterables, but doesn't descend further. I think this makes the comprehension more readable than the use of chain in this case. – Tim Dierks Sep 3 '14 at 14:13
  • 21
    @TimDierks: I'm not sure "this requires you to understand Python syntax" is an argument against using a given technique in Python. Sure, complex usage could confuse, but the "splat" operator is generally useful in many circumstances, and this isn't using it in a particularly obscure way; rejecting all language features that aren't necessarily obvious to beginning users means you're tying one hand behind your back. May as well throw out list comprehensions too while you're at it; users from other backgrounds would find a for loop that repeatedly appends more obvious. – ShadowRanger Nov 12 '15 at 20:26
  • what about ['abcde_', ['_abcde', ['e_abcd', ['de_abc', ['cde_ab', ['bcde_a']]]]]] – Aymon Fournier Dec 7 '15 at 19:24
  • This is slower than what Alex proposed, in the context below _all_altered_nbrs = {"nbr1":{"key1":"src2"},"nbr2":{"key2":"src4"}} %timeit [ k for key in _all_altered_nbrs.itervalues() for k in key.keys() ] %timeit reduce(lambda x, y: x.extend(y.keys()) or x, _all_altered_nbrs.itervalues(), []) %timeit list(itertools.chain(*[src_relation.keys() for src_relation in _all_altered_nbrs.itervalues()])) 100000 loops, best of 3: 3.47 µs per loop 100000 loops, best of 3: 6.74 µs per loop 100000 loops, best of 3: 12.7 µs per loop – Alex Punnen Apr 21 '16 at 6:48

Note from the author: This is inefficient. But fun, because monads are awesome. It's not appropriate for production Python code.

>>> sum(l, [])
[1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9]

This just sums the elements of iterable passed in the first argument, treating second argument as the initial value of the sum (if not given, 0 is used instead and this case will give you an error).

Because you are summing nested lists, you actually get [1,3]+[2,4] as a result of sum([[1,3],[2,4]],[]), which is equal to [1,3,2,4].

Note that only works on lists of lists. For lists of lists of lists, you'll need another solution.

  • 76
    that's pretty neat and clever but I wouldn't use it because it's confusing to read. – andrewrk Jun 15 '10 at 18:55
  • 72
    This is a Shlemiel the painter's algorithm joelonsoftware.com/articles/fog0000000319.html -- unnecessarily inefficient as well as unnecessarily ugly. – Mike Graham Apr 25 '12 at 18:24
  • 27
    The append operation on lists forms a Monoid, which is one of the most convenient abstractions for thinking of a + operation in a general sense (not limited to numbers only). So this answer deserves a +1 from me for (correct) treatment of lists as a monoid. The performance is concerning though... – ulidtko Dec 3 '14 at 10:35
  • 3
    @andrewrk Well, some people think that this is the cleanest way of doing it : youtube.com/watch?v=IOiZatlZtGU the ones who do not get why this is cool just need to wait a few decades until everybody does it this way :) let's use programming languages (and abstractions) that are discovered and not invented, Monoid is discovered. – jhegedus Oct 5 '15 at 8:51
  • 6
    this is a very inefficient way because of the quadratic aspect of the sum. – Jean-François Fabre Jul 31 '17 at 18:04

I tested most suggested solutions with perfplot (a pet project of mine, essentially a wrapper around timeit), and found

functools.reduce(operator.iconcat, a, [])

to be the fastest solution. (operator.iadd is equally fast.)

enter image description here


Code to reproduce the plot:

import functools
import itertools
import numpy
import operator
import perfplot


def forfor(a):
    return [item for sublist in a for item in sublist]


def sum_brackets(a):
    return sum(a, [])


def functools_reduce(a):
    return functools.reduce(operator.concat, a)


def functools_reduce_iconcat(a):
    return functools.reduce(operator.iconcat, a, [])


def itertools_chain(a):
    return list(itertools.chain.from_iterable(a))


def numpy_flat(a):
    return list(numpy.array(a).flat)


def numpy_concatenate(a):
    return list(numpy.concatenate(a))


perfplot.show(
    setup=lambda n: [list(range(10))] * n,
    kernels=[
        forfor, sum_brackets, functools_reduce, functools_reduce_iconcat,
        itertools_chain, numpy_flat, numpy_concatenate
        ],
    n_range=[2**k for k in range(16)],
    logx=True,
    logy=True,
    xlabel='num lists'
    )
from functools import reduce #python 3

>>> l = [[1,2,3],[4,5,6], [7], [8,9]]
>>> reduce(lambda x,y: x+y,l)
[1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9]

The extend() method in your example modifies x instead of returning a useful value (which reduce() expects).

A faster way to do the reduce version would be

>>> import operator
>>> l = [[1,2,3],[4,5,6], [7], [8,9]]
>>> reduce(operator.concat, l)
[1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9]
  • 8
    reduce(operator.add, l) would be the correct way to do the reduce version. Built-ins are faster than lambdas. – agf Sep 24 '11 at 10:04
  • 1
    @agf here is how: * timeit.timeit('reduce(operator.add, l)', 'import operator; l=[[1, 2, 3], [4, 5, 6, 7, 8], [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7]]', number=10000) 0.017956018447875977 * timeit.timeit('reduce(lambda x, y: x+y, l)', 'import operator; l=[[1, 2, 3], [4, 5, 6, 7, 8], [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7]]', number=10000) 0.025218963623046875 – lukmdo Mar 20 '12 at 22:13
  • 7
    This is a Shlemiel the painter's algorithm joelonsoftware.com/articles/fog0000000319.html – Mike Graham Apr 25 '12 at 18:26
  • 2
    this can use only for integers. But what if list contains string? – Freddy Sep 11 '15 at 7:16
  • 3
    @Freddy: The operator.add function works equally well for both lists of integers and lists of strings. – Greg Hewgill Sep 11 '15 at 7:38

Here is a general approach that applies to numbers, strings, nested lists and mixed containers.

Code

from collections import Iterable


def flatten(items):
    """Yield items from any nested iterable; see Reference."""
    for x in items:
        if isinstance(x, Iterable) and not isinstance(x, (str, bytes)):
            for sub_x in flatten(x):
                yield sub_x
        else:
            yield x

Note: in Python 3, yield from flatten(x) can replace for sub_x in flatten(x): yield sub_x

Demo

lst = [[1, 2, 3], [4, 5, 6], [7], [8, 9]]
list(flatten(lst))                                         # nested lists
# [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9]

mixed = [[1, [2]], (3, 4, {5, 6}, 7), 8, "9"]              # numbers, strs, nested & mixed
list(flatten(mixed))
# [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, '9']

Reference

  • This solution is modified from a recipe in Beazley, D. and B. Jones. Recipe 4.14, Python Cookbook 3rd Ed., O'Reilly Media Inc. Sebastopol, CA: 2013.
  • Found an earlier SO post, possibly the original demonstration.
  • 3
    I just wrote pretty much the same, because I didn't see your solution ... here is what I looked for "recursively flatten complete multiple lists" ... (+1) – Martin Thoma Mar 25 '17 at 15:32
  • 2
    @MartinThoma Much appreciated. FYI, if flattening nested iterables is a common practice for you, there are some third-party packages that handle this well. This may save from reinventing the wheel. I've mentioned more_itertools among others discussed in this post. Cheers. – pylang Mar 25 '17 at 17:51
  • 1
    Nice - was just wondering about a yield from type of construction on python after learning about yield * in es2015. – Triptych Apr 14 '17 at 21:30
  • 1
    replace by if isinstance(el, collections.Iterable) and not isinstance(el, (str, bytes)): to support strings. – Jorge Leitão May 13 '17 at 23:40
  • Maybe traverse could also be a good name for this way of a tree, whereas I'd keep it less universal for this answer by sticking to nested lists. – Wolf Jun 15 '17 at 10:22

I take my statement back. sum is not the winner. Although it is faster when the list is small. But the performance degrades significantly with larger lists.

>>> timeit.Timer(
        '[item for sublist in l for item in sublist]',
        'l=[[1, 2, 3], [4, 5, 6, 7, 8], [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7]] * 10000'
    ).timeit(100)
2.0440959930419922

The sum version is still running for more than a minute and it hasn't done processing yet!

For medium lists:

>>> timeit.Timer(
        '[item for sublist in l for item in sublist]',
        'l=[[1, 2, 3], [4, 5, 6, 7, 8], [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7]] * 10'
    ).timeit()
20.126545906066895
>>> timeit.Timer(
        'reduce(lambda x,y: x+y,l)',
        'l=[[1, 2, 3], [4, 5, 6, 7, 8], [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7]] * 10'
    ).timeit()
22.242258071899414
>>> timeit.Timer(
        'sum(l, [])',
        'l=[[1, 2, 3], [4, 5, 6, 7, 8], [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7]] * 10'
    ).timeit()
16.449732065200806

Using small lists and timeit: number=1000000

>>> timeit.Timer(
        '[item for sublist in l for item in sublist]',
        'l=[[1, 2, 3], [4, 5, 6, 7, 8], [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7]]'
    ).timeit()
2.4598159790039062
>>> timeit.Timer(
        'reduce(lambda x,y: x+y,l)',
        'l=[[1, 2, 3], [4, 5, 6, 7, 8], [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7]]'
    ).timeit()
1.5289170742034912
>>> timeit.Timer(
        'sum(l, [])',
        'l=[[1, 2, 3], [4, 5, 6, 7, 8], [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7]]'
    ).timeit()
1.0598428249359131
  • 21
    for a truly miniscule list, e.g. one with 3 sublists, maybe -- but since sum's performance goes with O(N**2) while the list comprehension's goes with O(N), just growing the input list a little will reverse things -- indeed the LC will be "infinitely faster" than sum at the limit as N grows. I was responsible for designing sum and doing its first implementation in the Python runtime, and I still wish I had found a way to effectively restrict it to summing numbers (what it's really good at) and block the "attractive nuisance" it offers to people who want to "sum" lists;-). – Alex Martelli Jun 4 '09 at 21:07

Why do you use extend?

reduce(lambda x, y: x+y, l)

This should work fine.

  • 13
    This probably creates many, many, intermediate lists. – Reut Sharabani May 23 '16 at 19:33
  • 4
    for python3 from functools import reduce – andorov Jan 19 '17 at 18:15
  • Sorry that's really slow see rest of answers – Mr_and_Mrs_D May 29 '17 at 12:04
  • This is by far the easiest to understand yet short solution that works on Python 2 and 3. I realise that a lot of Python folks are in data processing where there's huge amounts of data to process and thus care a lot about speed, but when you are writing a shell script and only have a few dozen elements in a few sub-lists, then this is perfect. – Asfand Qazi Sep 7 at 13:36

If you want to flatten a data-structure where you don't know how deep it's nested you could use iteration_utilities.deepflatten1

>>> from iteration_utilities import deepflatten

>>> l = [[1, 2, 3], [4, 5, 6], [7], [8, 9]]
>>> list(deepflatten(l, depth=1))
[1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9]

>>> l = [[1, 2, 3], [4, [5, 6]], 7, [8, 9]]
>>> list(deepflatten(l))
[1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9]

It's a generator so you need to cast the result to a list or explicitly iterate over it.


To flatten only one level and if each of the items is itself iterable you can also use iteration_utilities.flatten which itself is just a thin wrapper around itertools.chain.from_iterable:

>>> from iteration_utilities import flatten
>>> l = [[1, 2, 3], [4, 5, 6], [7], [8, 9]]
>>> list(flatten(l))
[1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9]

Just to add some timings (based on Nico Schlömer answer that didn't include the function presented in this answer):

enter image description here

It's a log-log plot to accommodate for the huge range of values spanned. For qualitative reasoning: Lower is better.

The results show that if the iterable contains only a few inner iterables then sum will be fastest, however for long iterables only the itertools.chain.from_iterable, iteration_utilities.deepflatten or the nested comprehension have reasonable performance with itertools.chain.from_iterable being the fastest (as already noticed by Nico Schlömer).

from itertools import chain
from functools import reduce
from collections import Iterable  # or from collections.abc import Iterable
import operator
from iteration_utilities import deepflatten

def nested_list_comprehension(lsts):
    return [item for sublist in lsts for item in sublist]

def itertools_chain_from_iterable(lsts):
    return list(chain.from_iterable(lsts))

def pythons_sum(lsts):
    return sum(lsts, [])

def reduce_add(lsts):
    return reduce(lambda x, y: x + y, lsts)

def pylangs_flatten(lsts):
    return list(flatten(lsts))

def flatten(items):
    """Yield items from any nested iterable; see REF."""
    for x in items:
        if isinstance(x, Iterable) and not isinstance(x, (str, bytes)):
            yield from flatten(x)
        else:
            yield x

def reduce_concat(lsts):
    return reduce(operator.concat, lsts)

def iteration_utilities_deepflatten(lsts):
    return list(deepflatten(lsts, depth=1))


from simple_benchmark import benchmark

b = benchmark(
    [nested_list_comprehension, itertools_chain_from_iterable, pythons_sum, reduce_add,
     pylangs_flatten, reduce_concat, iteration_utilities_deepflatten],
    arguments={2**i: [[0]*5]*(2**i) for i in range(1, 13)},
    argument_name='number of inner lists'
)

b.plot()

1 Disclaimer: I'm the author of that library

  • sum no longer works on arbitrary sequences as it starts with 0, making functools.reduce(operator.add, sequences) the replacement (aren't we glad they removed reduce from builtins?). When the types are known it might be faster to use type.__add__. – Yann Vernier May 14 at 6:29
  • @YannVernier Thanks for the information. I thought I ran these benchmarks on Python 3.6 and it worked with sum. Do you happen to know on which Python versions it stopped working? – MSeifert May 15 at 9:24
  • I was somewhat mistaken. 0 is just the default starting value, so it works if one uses the start argument to start with an empty list... but it still special cases strings and tells me to use join. It's implementing foldl instead of foldl1. The same issue pops up in 2.7. – Yann Vernier May 15 at 9:31

There seems to be a confusion with operator.add! When you add two lists together, the correct term for that is concat, not add. operator.concat is what you need to use.

If you're thinking functional, it is as easy as this::

>>> list2d = ((1, 2, 3), (4, 5, 6), (7,), (8, 9))
>>> reduce(operator.concat, list2d)
(1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9)

You see reduce respects the sequence type, so when you supply a tuple, you get back a tuple. let's try with a list::

>>> list2d = [[1, 2, 3],[4, 5, 6], [7], [8, 9]]
>>> reduce(operator.concat, list2d)
[1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9]

Aha, you get back a list.

How about performance::

>>> list2d = [[1, 2, 3],[4, 5, 6], [7], [8, 9]]
>>> %timeit list(itertools.chain.from_iterable(list2d))
1000000 loops, best of 3: 1.36 µs per loop

from_iterable is pretty fast! But it's no comparison to reduce with concat.

>>> list2d = ((1, 2, 3),(4, 5, 6), (7,), (8, 9))
>>> %timeit reduce(operator.concat, list2d)
1000000 loops, best of 3: 492 ns per loop
  • 1
    Hmm to be fair second example should be list also (or first tuple ?) – Mr_and_Mrs_D May 28 '17 at 13:20

The reason your function didn't work: the extend extends array in-place and doesn't return it. You can still return x from lambda, using some trick:

reduce(lambda x,y: x.extend(y) or x, l)

Note: extend is more efficient than + on lists.

  • 5
    extend is better used as newlist = [], extend = newlist.extend, for sublist in l: extend(l) as it avoids the (rather large) overhead of the lambda, the attribute lookup on x, and the or. – agf Sep 24 '11 at 10:12

Consider installing the more_itertools package.

> pip install more_itertools

It ships with an implementation for flatten (source, from the itertools recipes):

import more_itertools


lst = [[1, 2, 3], [4, 5, 6], [7], [8, 9]]
list(more_itertools.flatten(lst))
# [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9]

As of version 2.4, you can flatten more complicated, nested iterables with more_itertools.collapse (source, contributed by abarnet).

lst = [[1, 2, 3], [4, 5, 6], [7], [8, 9]]
list(more_itertools.collapse(lst)) 
# [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9]

lst = [[1, 2, 3], [[4, 5, 6]], [[[7]]], 8, 9]              # complex nesting
list(more_itertools.collapse(lst))
# [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9]
def flatten(l, a):
    for i in l:
        if isinstance(i, list):
            flatten(i, a)
        else:
            a.append(i)
    return a

print(flatten([[[1, [1,1, [3, [4,5,]]]], 2, 3], [4, 5],6], []))

# [1, 1, 1, 3, 4, 5, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6]
  • Doesn't work for me unless I manually specify a=[]: >>> flatten([[1,2,3],[4,5,6]]) [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6] >>> flatten([[1,2,3],[4,5,6]]) [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6] – Jeff Nov 6 '16 at 22:52
  • @Jeff My answer was edited by @ deleet ... Check my original answer and it works... – Anil Nov 8 '16 at 3:04
  • 1
    nice, thanks. I rolled back @deleet's edit – Jeff Nov 8 '16 at 18:21
  • 2
    Yes, it was buggy as I found out later! I did test it, but the bug only happens after the first run. The reason is that the default argument [] gets treated as a consistent object in Python. So next time you run the function, it begins with the list you used last time! Very nasty bug, hard to figure out. In R (which I mostly use) this would have worked due to copy semantics. Does anyone know a Python solution? Having to manually specify an empty list every time is not a good design. I need this function for my own project, so I hope someone knows. :) – Deleet Nov 9 '16 at 3:27
  • I posted a fixed version now. – Deleet Nov 11 '16 at 11:53

An bad feature of Anil's function above is that it requires the user to always manually specify the second argument to be an empty list []. This should instead be a default. Due to the way Python objects work, these should be set inside the function, not in the arguments.

Here's a working function:

def list_flatten(l, a=None):
    #check a
    if a is None:
        #initialize with empty list
        a = []

    for i in l:
        if isinstance(i, list):
            list_flatten(i, a)
        else:
            a.append(i)
    return a

Testing:

In [2]: lst = [1, 2, [3], [[4]],[5,[6]]]

In [3]: lst
Out[3]: [1, 2, [3], [[4]], [5, [6]]]

In [11]: list_flatten(lst)
Out[11]: [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6]

Following seem simplest to me:

>>> import numpy as np
>>> l = [[1, 2, 3], [4, 5, 6], [7], [8, 9]]
>>> print (np.concatenate(l))
[1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9]
  • doesn't work with already flat arrays, consider: import numpy as np l = [1, 2, 3] print (np.concatenate(l)) ValueError: zero-dimensional arrays cannot be concatenated – stason Jun 23 at 20:51
  • I'm not sure what you achieve by downvoting a comment that identifies a flaw in your answer. The voting system is here to help others save their time using answers that work. Yours works only partially as indicated above and makes an assumption on the input being non-flat and doesn't generalize. – stason Jun 25 at 16:58

One can also use NumPy's flat:

import numpy as np
list(np.array(l).flat)

Edit 11/02/2016: Only works when sublists have identical dimensions.

  • would that be the optimal solution ? – RetroCode Sep 22 '16 at 20:08

matplotlib.cbook.flatten() will work for nested lists even if they nest more deeply than the example.

import matplotlib
l = [[1, 2, 3], [4, 5, 6], [7], [8, 9]]
print(list(matplotlib.cbook.flatten(l)))
l2 = [[1, 2, 3], [4, 5, 6], [7], [8, [9, 10, [11, 12, [13]]]]]
print list(matplotlib.cbook.flatten(l2))

Result:

[1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9]
[1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13]

This is 18x faster than underscore._.flatten:

Average time over 1000 trials of matplotlib.cbook.flatten: 2.55e-05 sec
Average time over 1000 trials of underscore._.flatten: 4.63e-04 sec
(time for underscore._)/(time for matplotlib.cbook) = 18.1233394636

The accepted answer did not work for me when dealing with text-based lists of variable lengths. Here is an alternate approach that did work for me.

l = ['aaa', 'bb', 'cccccc', ['xx', 'yyyyyyy']]

Accepted answer that did not work:

flat_list = [item for sublist in l for item in sublist]
print(flat_list)
['a', 'a', 'a', 'b', 'b', 'c', 'c', 'c', 'c', 'c', 'c', 'xx', 'yyyyyyy']

New proposed solution that did work for me:

flat_list = []
_ = [flat_list.extend(item) if isinstance(item, list) else flat_list.append(item) for item in l if item]
print(flat_list)
['aaa', 'bb', 'cccccc', 'xx', 'yyyyyyy']

Simple code for underscore.py package fan

from underscore import _
_.flatten([[1, 2, 3], [4, 5, 6], [7], [8, 9]])
# [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9]

It solves all flatten problems (none list item or complex nesting)

from underscore import _
# 1 is none list item
# [2, [3]] is complex nesting
_.flatten([1, [2, [3]], [4, 5, 6], [7], [8, 9]])
# [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9]

You can install underscore.py with pip

pip install underscore.py
  • Similarly, you can use pydash. I find this version to be much more readable than the list comprehension or any other answers. – gliemezis Jun 6 '17 at 3:22
  • 1
    This is super slow. – Nico Schlömer Jul 26 '17 at 9:52
  • Why does it have a module named _? That seems like a bad name. See stackoverflow.com/a/5893946/6605826 – EL_DON Jul 20 at 18:04
  • 2
    @EL_DON: From underscore.py readme page "Underscore.py is a python port of excellent javascript library underscore.js". I think it's the reason for this name. And yes, It's not a good name for python – Vu Anh Jul 21 at 2:26

You can use numpy :
flat_list = list(np.concatenate(list_of_list))

  • 1
    This will work only for numerical data – InAFlash Aug 16 at 11:51
  • This works for numerical, strings and mixed lists also – Nitin Sep 19 at 7:53
def flatten(alist):
    if alist == []:
        return []
    elif type(alist) is not list:
        return [alist]
    else:
        return flatten(alist[0]) + flatten(alist[1:])

Another unusual approach that works for hetero- and homogeneous lists of integers:

from typing import List


def flatten(l: list) -> List[int]:
    """Flatten an arbitrary deep nested list of lists of integers.

    Examples:
        >>> flatten([1, 2, [1, [10]]])
        [1, 2, 1, 10]

    Args:
        l: Union[l, Union[int, List[int]]

    Returns:
        Flatted list of integer
    """
    return [int(i.strip('[ ]')) for i in str(l).split(',')]
  • That's just a more complicated and a bit slower way of what ᴡʜᴀᴄᴋᴀᴍᴀᴅᴏᴏᴅʟᴇ3000 already posted before. I reinvented his proposal yesterday, so this approach seems quite popular these days ;) – Darkonaut Jan 10 at 22:03
  • Not quite: wierd_list = [[1, 2, 3], [4, 5, 6], [7], [8, 9], 10] >> nice_list=[1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 1, 0] – tharndt Jan 11 at 8:17
  • my code as one liner would be : flat_list = [int(e.replace('[','').replace(']','')) for e in str(deep_list).split(',')] – tharndt Jan 11 at 8:32
  • 1
    You are indeed right +1, ᴡʜᴀᴄᴋᴀᴍᴀᴅᴏᴏᴅʟᴇ3000's proposal won't work with multiple digit numbers, I also didn't test this before although it should be obvious. You could simplify your code and write [int(e.strip('[ ]')) for e in str(deep_list).split(',')]. But I'd suggest to stick with Deleet's proposal for real use cases. It doesn't contain hacky type transformations, it's faster and more versatile because it naturally also handles lists with mixed types. – Darkonaut Jan 11 at 16:31
  • 1
    Unfortunately no. But I saw this code recently here: Python Practice Book 6.1.2 – tharndt Jan 15 at 8:18

If you are willing to give up a tiny amount of speed for a cleaner look, then you could use numpy.concatenate().tolist() or numpy.concatenate().ravel().tolist():

import numpy

l = [[1, 2, 3], [4, 5, 6], [7], [8, 9]] * 99

%timeit numpy.concatenate(l).ravel().tolist()
1000 loops, best of 3: 313 µs per loop

%timeit numpy.concatenate(l).tolist()
1000 loops, best of 3: 312 µs per loop

%timeit [item for sublist in l for item in sublist]
1000 loops, best of 3: 31.5 µs per loop

You can find out more here in the docs numpy.concatenate and numpy.ravel

Fastest solution I have found (for large list anyway):

import numpy as np
#turn list into an array and flatten()
np.array(l).flatten()

Done! You can of course turn it back into a list by executing list(l)

  • This is wrong, flatten will reduce the dimensions of the nd array to one, but not concatenate the lists inside as one. – Ando Jurai Jun 30 '17 at 8:15
flat_list = []
for i in list_of_list:
    flat_list+=i

This Code also works fine as it just extend the list all the way. Although it is much similar but only have one for loop. So It have less complexity than adding 2 for loops.

I recently came across a situation where I had a mix of strings and numeric data in sublists such as

test = ['591212948',
['special', 'assoc', 'of', 'Chicago', 'Jon', 'Doe'],
['Jon'],
['Doe'],
['fl'],
92001,
555555555,
'hello',
['hello2', 'a'],
'b',
['hello33', ['z', 'w'], 'b']]

where methods like flat_list = [item for sublist in test for item in sublist] have not worked. So, I came up with the following solution for 1+ level of sublists

def concatList(data):
    results = []
    for rec in data:
        if type(rec) == list:
            results += rec
            results = concatList(results)
        else:
            results.append(rec)
    return results

And the result

In [38]: concatList(test)
Out[38]:
 Out[60]:
['591212948',
'special',
'assoc',
'of',
'Chicago',
'Jon',
'Doe',
'Jon',
'Doe',
'fl',
92001,
555555555,
'hello',
'hello2',
'a',
'b',
'hello33',
'z',
'w',
'b']

Note: Below applies to Python 3.3+ because it uses yield_from. six is also a third-party package, though it is stable. Alternately, you could use sys.version.


In the case of obj = [[1, 2,], [3, 4], [5, 6]], all of the solutions here are good, including list comprehension and itertools.chain.from_iterable.

However, consider this slightly more complex case:

>>> obj = [[1, 2, 3], [4, 5], 6, 'abc', [7], [8, [9, 10]]]

There are several problems here:

  • One element, 6, is just a scalar; it's not iterable, so the above routes will fail here.
  • One element, 'abc', is technically iterable (all strs are). However, reading between the lines a bit, you don't want to treat it as such--you want to treat it as a single element.
  • The final element, [8, [9, 10]] is itself a nested iterable. Basic list comprehension and chain.from_iterable only extract "1 level down."

You can remedy this as follows:

>>> from collections import Iterable
>>> from six import string_types

>>> def flatten(obj):
...     for i in obj:
...         if isinstance(i, Iterable) and not isinstance(i, string_types):
...             yield from flatten(i)
...         else:
...             yield i


>>> list(flatten(obj))
[1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 'abc', 7, 8, 9, 10]

Here, you check that the sub-element (1) is iterable with Iterable, an ABC from itertools, but also want to ensure that (2) the element is not "string-like."

  • 1
    If you are still interested in Python 2 compatibility, change yield from to a for loop, e.g. for x in flatten(i): yield x – pylang Jun 19 at 19:06

You can avoid recursive calls to the stack using an actual stack data structure pretty simply.

alist = [1,[1,2],[1,2,[4,5,6],3, "33"]]
newlist = []

while len(alist) > 0 :
  templist = alist.pop()
  if type(templist) == type(list()) :
    while len(templist) > 0 :
      temp = templist.pop()
      if type(temp) == type(list()) :
        for x in temp :
          templist.append(x)
      else :
        newlist.append(temp)
  else :
    newlist.append(templist)
print(list(reversed(newlist)))
  • This doesn't support iterable collections other than lists. You might want to consider using isinstance(temp, Iterable) like some of the other examples. I think you can also simplify this a bit, if you add alist to templist at the beginning, you should only need the nested while loop. You could also use a queue data structure in order to avoid reversing the entire list at the end. – Some Java Programmer Apr 18 at 14:05

This may not be the most efficient way but I thought to put a one-liner (actually a two-liner). Both versions will work on arbitrary hierarchy nested lists, and exploits language features (Python3.5) and recursion.

def make_list_flat (l):
    flist = []
    flist.extend ([l]) if (type (l) is not list) else [flist.extend (make_list_flat (e)) for e in l]
    return flist

a = [[1, 2], [[[[3, 4, 5], 6]]], 7, [8, [9, [10, 11], 12, [13, 14, [15, [[16, 17], 18]]]]]]
flist = make_list_flat(a)
print (flist)

The output is

[1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18]

This works in a depth first manner. The recursion goes down until it finds a non-list element, then extends the local variable flist and then rolls back it to the parent. Whenever flist is returned, it is extended to the parent's flist in the list comprehension. Therefore, at the root, a flat list is returned.

The above one creates several local lists and returns them which are used to extend the parent's list. I think the way around for this may be creating a gloabl flist, like below.

a = [[1, 2], [[[[3, 4, 5], 6]]], 7, [8, [9, [10, 11], 12, [13, 14, [15, [[16, 17], 18]]]]]]
flist = []
def make_list_flat (l):
    flist.extend ([l]) if (type (l) is not list) else [make_list_flat (e) for e in l]

make_list_flat(a)
print (flist)

The output is again

[1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18]

Although I am not sure at this time about the efficiency.

A simple recursive method using reduce from functools and the add operator on lists:

>>> from functools import reduce
>>> from operator import add
>>> flatten = lambda lst: [lst] if type(lst) is int else reduce(add, [flatten(ele) for ele in lst])
>>> flatten(l)
[1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9]

The function flatten takes in lst as parameter. It loops all the elements of lst until reaching integers (can also change int to float, str, etc. for other data types), which are added to the return value of the outermost recursion.

Recursion, unlike methods like for loops and monads, is that it is a general solution not limited by the list depth. For example, a list with depth of 5 can be flattened the same way as l:

>>> l2 = [[3, [1, 2], [[[6], 5], 4, 0], 7, [[8]], [9, 10]]]
>>> flatten(l2)
[3, 1, 2, 6, 5, 4, 0, 7, 8, 9, 10]

protected by Ashwini Chaudhary Jan 11 '13 at 13:22

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