602

I am quite new to Python and I am now struggling with formatting my data nicely for printed output.

I have one list that is used for two headings, and a matrix that should be the contents of the table. Like so:

teams_list = ["Man Utd", "Man City", "T Hotspur"]
data = np.array([[1, 2, 1],
                 [0, 1, 0],
                 [2, 4, 2]])

Note that the heading names are not necessarily the same lengths. The data entries are all integers, though.

Now, I want to represent this in a table format, something like this:

Man Utd Man City T Hotspur
Man Utd 1 0 0
Man City 1 1 0
T Hotspur 0 1 2

I have a hunch that there must be a data structure for this, but I cannot find it. I have tried using a dictionary and formatting the printing, I have tried for-loops with indentation and I have tried printing as strings.

I am sure there must be a very simple way to do this, but I am probably missing it due to lack of experience.

5
  • 3
    +1, I was just trying to do the same thing last night. Are you just trying to print to the command line or are you using a GUI module?
    – HellaMad
    Commented Mar 2, 2012 at 15:36
  • Just printing to the command line. However, it needs to pass a unit-test case, so formatting is pretty important here.
    – hjweide
    Commented Mar 2, 2012 at 15:38
  • 3
    possible duplicate of Printing tabular data in Python Commented Mar 25, 2014 at 11:12
  • 1
    Possible duplicate of Python: pretty-printing ascii tables? Commented Jul 24, 2016 at 9:39
  • 1
    Note that the requirement here is pretty specialized, since the row and column labels are the same. So for this particular case, the ad-hoc code is a nice example of how easy this can be. But the other solutions here may be better for more generic table display.
    – nealmcb
    Commented Feb 14, 2017 at 15:36

23 Answers 23

998

There are some light and useful python packages for this purpose:

1. tabulate: https://pypi.python.org/pypi/tabulate

from tabulate import tabulate
print(tabulate([['Alice', 24], ['Bob', 19]], headers=['Name', 'Age']))
Name      Age
------  -----
Alice      24
Bob        19

tabulate has many options to specify headers and table format.

print(tabulate([['Alice', 24], ['Bob', 19]], headers=['Name', 'Age'], tablefmt='orgtbl'))
| Name   |   Age |
|--------+-------|
| Alice  |    24 |
| Bob    |    19 |

2. PrettyTable: https://pypi.python.org/pypi/PrettyTable

from prettytable import PrettyTable
t = PrettyTable(['Name', 'Age'])
t.add_row(['Alice', 24])
t.add_row(['Bob', 19])
print(t)
+-------+-----+
|  Name | Age |
+-------+-----+
| Alice |  24 |
|  Bob  |  19 |
+-------+-----+

PrettyTable has options to read data from csv, html, sql database. Also you are able to select subset of data, sort table and change table styles.

3. texttable: https://pypi.python.org/pypi/texttable

from texttable import Texttable
t = Texttable()
t.add_rows([['Name', 'Age'], ['Alice', 24], ['Bob', 19]])
print(t.draw())
+-------+-----+
| Name  | Age |
+=======+=====+
| Alice | 24  |
+-------+-----+
| Bob   | 19  |
+-------+-----+

with texttable you can control horizontal/vertical align, border style and data types.

4. termtables: https://github.com/nschloe/termtables

import termtables as tt

string = tt.to_string(
    [["Alice", 24], ["Bob", 19]],
    header=["Name", "Age"],
    style=tt.styles.ascii_thin_double,
    # alignment="ll",
    # padding=(0, 1),
)
print(string)
+-------+-----+
| Name  | Age |
+=======+=====+
| Alice | 24  |
+-------+-----+
| Bob   | 19  |
+-------+-----+

with texttable you can control horizontal/vertical align, border style and data types.

Other options:

  • terminaltables Easily draw tables in terminal/console applications from a list of lists of strings. Supports multi-line rows.
  • asciitable Asciitable can read and write a wide range of ASCII table formats via built-in Extension Reader Classes.
9
  • 29
    I've found tabulate to be a very useful tool for building data-centric CLI tools. That, combined with click (pip install click), and you've got a real stew going.
    – alexbw
    Commented Nov 23, 2014 at 20:53
  • 5
    This is wonderful, thank you. Personally, which one would you prefer among those three?
    – Jim Raynor
    Commented Jun 16, 2015 at 14:03
  • 3
    terminaltables is good for Chinese, maybe other non-english languages
    – thinker3
    Commented Jul 3, 2016 at 23:32
  • I like the column add method in pretty table.
    – Goosebumps
    Commented Oct 11, 2016 at 8:26
  • 9
    I just played with the main packages and IMO "beautifultable" - best, maintained, good API & doco, support for colored. "texttable" - nice, maintained, good API but use of colored use throws tables out of alignment. "terminaltables" - good, doco via code examples only. "PrettyTable" - ok, but old, table 'titles' don't work for me. "Tabulate" - good, but column alignment coalign keyword not supported in official pypi release. "tableprint" - average, API complex, not enough common usage examples.
    – abulka
    Commented Jan 17, 2019 at 1:12
307

Some ad-hoc code:

row_format ="{:>15}" * (len(teams_list) + 1)
print(row_format.format("", *teams_list))
for team, row in zip(teams_list, data):
    print(row_format.format(team, *row))

This relies on str.format() and the Format Specification Mini-Language.

2
  • 7
    If the data in the body is larger than the headers, you can set column width based on the first row of data. for t in data[0]: row_format+="{:<"+str(len(t)+5)+"}" Commented Feb 23, 2016 at 16:42
  • 7
    I like this solution more than accepted one because it doesn't require third-party libraries. Want to add another convenient trick: you can use max length of string as width of the column instead of hardcoded number. It will be like this: f'{team:>{max_len_of_team}}'.
    – Kirill
    Commented Oct 5, 2021 at 16:52
109
>>> import pandas
>>> pandas.DataFrame(data, teams_list, teams_list)
           Man Utd  Man City  T Hotspur
Man Utd    1        2         1        
Man City   0        1         0        
T Hotspur  2        4         2        
8
  • 7
    This looks very promising, thanks, but I am trying to do this without using any more imported libraries than absolutely necessary.
    – hjweide
    Commented Mar 2, 2012 at 15:50
  • 44
    Using pandas just for output formatting seems like Overkill (capital O intended).
    – Niels Bom
    Commented Nov 6, 2013 at 15:56
  • 86
    @NielsBom: come for the output formatting, stay for data analysis and modeling :)
    – jfs
    Commented Nov 6, 2013 at 18:08
  • 43
    @J.F.Sebastian to me it was more like "come for the output formatting, run away screaming because of the 10 minute numpy compilation that made my computer sound like a hairdryer" ;-)
    – Niels Bom
    Commented Nov 7, 2013 at 9:13
  • 4
    @NielsBom: pip install numpy uses binary wheels now on most platforms (no compilation). Obviously, other binary installation options were available even before that.
    – jfs
    Commented Aug 4, 2016 at 11:54
94

Python actually makes this quite easy.

Something like

for i in range(10):
    print '%-12i%-12i' % (10 ** i, 20 ** i)

will have the output

1           1           
10          20          
100         400         
1000        8000        
10000       160000      
100000      3200000     
1000000     64000000    
10000000    1280000000  
100000000   25600000000
1000000000  512000000000

The % within the string is essentially an escape character and the characters following it tell python what kind of format the data should have. The % outside and after the string is telling python that you intend to use the previous string as the format string and that the following data should be put into the format specified.

In this case I used "%-12i" twice. To break down each part:

'-' (left align)
'12' (how much space to be given to this part of the output)
'i' (we are printing an integer)

From the docs: https://docs.python.org/2/library/stdtypes.html#string-formatting

3
  • 2
    This answer put me on track to finding what I was looking for! For python 3, I ended up using it like print('%-20.2f' % position['deg'], '%-17.2f' % position['v2']) where the .2 specifies precision of the float f
    – Ross
    Commented Feb 9, 2020 at 22:32
  • 1
    I would right align when printing integers, but that's a personal preference, I guess. Commented Oct 12, 2020 at 20:51
  • 2
    It's also possible to combine this with f-string syntax to algin dynamically: f"<%-{max(a)}s>" % 1 Commented May 11, 2022 at 19:30
36

Updating Sven Marnach's answer to work in Python 3.4:

row_format ="{:>15}" * (len(teams_list) + 1)
print(row_format.format("", *teams_list))
for team, row in zip(teams_list, data):
    print(row_format.format(team, *row))
22

I know that I am late to the party, but I just made a library for this that I think could really help. It is extremely simple, that's why I think you should use it. It is called TableIT.

Basic Use

To use it, first follow the download instructions on the GitHub Page.

Then import it:

import TableIt

Then make a list of lists where each inner list is a row:

table = [
    [4, 3, "Hi"],
    [2, 1, 808890312093],
    [5, "Hi", "Bye"]
]

Then all you have to do is print it:

TableIt.printTable(table)

This is the output you get:

+--------------------------------------------+
| 4            | 3            | Hi           |
| 2            | 1            | 808890312093 |
| 5            | Hi           | Bye          |
+--------------------------------------------+

Field Names

You can use field names if you want to (if you aren't using field names you don't have to say useFieldNames=False because it is set to that by default):


TableIt.printTable(table, useFieldNames=True)

From that you will get:

+--------------------------------------------+
| 4            | 3            | Hi           |
+--------------+--------------+--------------+
| 2            | 1            | 808890312093 |
| 5            | Hi           | Bye          |
+--------------------------------------------+

There are other uses to, for example you could do this:

import TableIt

myList = [
    ["Name", "Email"],
    ["Richard", "[email protected]"],
    ["Tasha", "[email protected]"]
]

TableIt.print(myList, useFieldNames=True)

From that:

+-----------------------------------------------+
| Name                  | Email                 |
+-----------------------+-----------------------+
| Richard               | [email protected] |
| Tasha                 | [email protected]    |
+-----------------------------------------------+

Or you could do:

import TableIt

myList = [
    ["", "a", "b"],
    ["x", "a + x", "a + b"],
    ["z", "a + z", "z + b"]
]

TableIt.printTable(myList, useFieldNames=True)

And from that you get:

+-----------------------+
|       | a     | b     |
+-------+-------+-------+
| x     | a + x | a + b |
| z     | a + z | z + b |
+-----------------------+

Colors

You can also use colors.

You use colors by using the color option (by default it is set to None) and specifying RGB values.

Using the example from above:

import TableIt

myList = [
    ["", "a", "b"],
    ["x", "a + x", "a + b"],
    ["z", "a + z", "z + b"]
]

TableIt.printTable(myList, useFieldNames=True, color=(26, 156, 171))

Then you will get:

enter image description here

Please note that printing colors might not work for you but it does works the exact same as the other libraries that print colored text. I have tested and every single color works. The blue is not messed up either as it would if using the default 34m ANSI escape sequence (if you don't know what that is it doesn't matter). Anyway, it all comes from the fact that every color is RGB value rather than a system default.

More Info

For more info check the GitHub Page

7
  • TableIt is really a nice tool. Simple but powerful. The only disadvantage I think is TableIt has not declared a LICENSE Commented Jan 14, 2020 at 21:29
  • @Endle_Zhenbo Hey! Thanks a lot, I'll work on that as soon as possible!
    – BeastCoder
    Commented Jan 14, 2020 at 21:49
  • 2
    @Endle_Zhenbo, I know it has been a while, but I finally placed a license on the project.
    – BeastCoder
    Commented Feb 20, 2020 at 13:35
  • Any updates on when this can be pip installed?
    – pasha
    Commented Jan 8, 2021 at 8:40
  • 1
    @pasha I'll publish it within the next week, I'll aim for tomorrow, though!
    – BeastCoder
    Commented Jan 10, 2021 at 20:40
22

Just use it

from beautifultable import BeautifulTable

table = BeautifulTable()
table.column_headers = ["", "Man Utd","Man City","T Hotspur"]
table.append_row(['Man Utd',  1,  2,  3])
table.append_row(['Man City', 7, 4,  1])
table.append_row(['T Hotspur', 3, 2,  2])
print(table)

As a result, you will get such a neat table and that's it. enter image description here

3
  • 3
    this methods are deprecated, use table.rows.append() and table.columns.header instead
    – vladkras
    Commented Jul 23, 2021 at 12:03
  • I haven't tried all the other ways but having rolled my own over the many years - printf, cout, <table>, postscript, etc - I truly appreciate a good table formatting package. What really sold me was: table.set_style(BeautifulTable.STYLE_NONE)
    – Jim
    Commented Jan 28, 2023 at 18:25
  • Wouldn't let me align based on index.
    – Andrew
    Commented Jun 22, 2023 at 19:12
15

A simple way to do this is to loop over all columns, measure their width, create a row_template for that max width, and then print the rows. It's not exactly what you are looking for, because in this case, you first have to put your headings inside the table, but I'm thinking it might be useful to someone else.

table = [
    ["", "Man Utd", "Man City", "T Hotspur"],
    ["Man Utd", 1, 0, 0],
    ["Man City", 1, 1, 0],
    ["T Hotspur", 0, 1, 2],
]
def print_table(table):
    longest_cols = [
        (max([len(str(row[i])) for row in table]) + 3)
        for i in range(len(table[0]))
    ]
    row_format = "".join(["{:>" + str(longest_col) + "}" for longest_col in longest_cols])
    for row in table:
        print(row_format.format(*row))

You use it like this:

>>> print_table(table)

            Man Utd   Man City   T Hotspur
  Man Utd         1          0           0
 Man City         1          1           0
T Hotspur         0          1           2
3
  • Nice, to minimize we can use zip(*matrix) to get cols. so to get max len in col : [len(max(col , key=len))+3 for col in zip(*table)] . I tried to use .format and f-string with variable pad filling, and apply pad len at later point of time useing eval after initialization of f-string. but were unsuccessful and ended up using this method.
    – Rilwan
    Commented May 16, 2021 at 16:47
  • @Rilwan: Are you sure we need to minimize? I'm quite happy with how readable the above is, especially since I wrote it 3 years ago, and I still understand what it does. Commented May 20, 2021 at 7:55
  • Not necessarily, Just our choice . As we have inbuilt zipper merge utility available, I tend to use zip(*matrix) to get column values instead of iterating over rows and get value by index. So thought of sharing it. Thanks.
    – Rilwan
    Commented May 22, 2021 at 13:45
15

try rich: https://github.com/Textualize/rich

from rich.console import Console
from rich.table import Table

console = Console()

table = Table(show_header=True, header_style="bold magenta")
table.add_column("Date", style="dim", width=12)
table.add_column("Title")
table.add_column("Production Budget", justify="right")
table.add_column("Box Office", justify="right")
table.add_row(
    "Dec 20, 2019", "Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker", "$275,000,000", "$375,126,118"
)
table.add_row(
    "May 25, 2018",
    "[red]Solo[/red]: A Star Wars Story",
    "$275,000,000",
    "$393,151,347",
)
table.add_row(
    "Dec 15, 2017",
    "Star Wars Ep. VIII: The Last Jedi",
    "$262,000,000",
    "[bold]$1,332,539,889[/bold]",
)

console.print(table)

https://github.com/willmcgugan/rich/raw/master/imgs/table.png

enter image description here

1
  • I found this linked in the termtables answer and was going to add it here if it wasn't already. What I like about it is I can style a row to have the colors reversed for selected rows and it can mix styles. If I have all my columns a specific color, and my selected rows bg/fg color reversed, it applies both styles in each cell.
    – rtaft
    Commented Feb 15, 2022 at 14:24
12

When I do this, I like to have some control over the details of how the table is formatted. In particular, I want header cells to have a different format than body cells, and the table column widths to only be as wide as each one needs to be. Here's my solution:

def format_matrix(header, matrix,
                  top_format, left_format, cell_format, row_delim, col_delim):
    table = [[''] + header] + [[name] + row for name, row in zip(header, matrix)]
    table_format = [['{:^{}}'] + len(header) * [top_format]] \
                 + len(matrix) * [[left_format] + len(header) * [cell_format]]
    col_widths = [max(
                      len(format.format(cell, 0))
                      for format, cell in zip(col_format, col))
                  for col_format, col in zip(zip(*table_format), zip(*table))]
    return row_delim.join(
               col_delim.join(
                   format.format(cell, width)
                   for format, cell, width in zip(row_format, row, col_widths))
               for row_format, row in zip(table_format, table))

print format_matrix(['Man Utd', 'Man City', 'T Hotspur', 'Really Long Column'],
                    [[1, 2, 1, -1], [0, 1, 0, 5], [2, 4, 2, 2], [0, 1, 0, 6]],
                    '{:^{}}', '{:<{}}', '{:>{}.3f}', '\n', ' | ')

Here's the output:

                   | Man Utd | Man City | T Hotspur | Really Long Column
Man Utd            |   1.000 |    2.000 |     1.000 |             -1.000
Man City           |   0.000 |    1.000 |     0.000 |              5.000
T Hotspur          |   2.000 |    4.000 |     2.000 |              2.000
Really Long Column |   0.000 |    1.000 |     0.000 |              6.000
11
table_data= [[1,2,3],[4,5,6],[7,8,9]]

for row in table_data:
    print("{: >20} {: >20} {: >20}".format(*row))

OUTPUT:

               1                  2                3
               4                  5                6
               7                  8                9

wherein f string formatting

  1. ">" is used for right alignment
  2. "<" is used for left alignment

20 is the space width that can be changed according to the requirement.

2
9

I think this is what you are looking for.

It's a simple module that just computes the maximum required width for the table entries and then just uses rjust and ljust to do a pretty print of the data.

If you want your left heading right aligned just change this call:

 print >> out, row[0].ljust(col_paddings[0] + 1),

From line 53 with:

 print >> out, row[0].rjust(col_paddings[0] + 1),
2
9

Pure Python 3

def print_table(data, cols, wide):
    '''Prints formatted data on columns of given width.'''
    n, r = divmod(len(data), cols)
    pat = '{{:{}}}'.format(wide)
    line = '\n'.join(pat * cols for _ in range(n))
    last_line = pat * r
    print(line.format(*data))
    print(last_line.format(*data[n*cols:]))

data = [str(i) for i in range(27)]
print_table(data, 6, 12)

Will print

0           1           2           3           4           5           
6           7           8           9           10          11          
12          13          14          15          16          17          
18          19          20          21          22          23          
24          25          26
0
6

The following function will create the requested table (with or without numpy) with Python 3 (maybe also Python 2). I have chosen to set the width of each column to match that of the longest team name. You could modify it if you wanted to use the length of the team name for each column, but will be more complicated.

Note: For a direct equivalent in Python 2 you could replace the zip with izip from itertools.

def print_results_table(data, teams_list):
    str_l = max(len(t) for t in teams_list)
    print(" ".join(['{:>{length}s}'.format(t, length = str_l) for t in [" "] + teams_list]))
    for t, row in zip(teams_list, data):
        print(" ".join(['{:>{length}s}'.format(str(x), length = str_l) for x in [t] + row]))

teams_list = ["Man Utd", "Man City", "T Hotspur"]
data = [[1, 2, 1],
        [0, 1, 0],
        [2, 4, 2]]

print_results_table(data, teams_list)

This will produce the following table:

            Man Utd  Man City T Hotspur
  Man Utd         1         2         1
 Man City         0         1         0
T Hotspur         2         4         2

If you want to have vertical line separators, you can replace " ".join with " | ".join.

References:

6

For simple cases you can just use modern string formatting (simplified Sven's answer):
f'{column1_value:15} {column2_value}':

table = {
    'Amplitude': [round(amplitude, 3), 'm³/h'],
    'MAE': [round(mae, 2), 'm³/h'],
    'MAPE': [round(mape, 2), '%'],
}

for metric, value in table.items():
    print(f'{metric:14} : {value[0]:>6.3f} {value[1]}')

Output:

Amplitude      :  1.438 m³/h
MAE            :  0.171 m³/h
MAPE           : 27.740 %

Source: https://docs.python.org/3/tutorial/inputoutput.html#formatted-string-literals

4

I found this just looking for a way to output simple columns. If you just need no-fuss columns, then you can use this:

print("Titlex\tTitley\tTitlez")
for x, y, z in data:
    print(x, "\t", y, "\t", z)

EDIT: I was trying to be as simple as possible, and thereby did some things manually instead of using the teams list. To generalize to the OP's actual question:

#Column headers
print("", end="\t")
for team in teams_list:
    print(" ", team, end="")
print()
# rows
for team, row in enumerate(data):
    teamlabel = teams_list[team]
    while len(teamlabel) < 9:
        teamlabel = " " + teamlabel
    print(teamlabel, end="\t")
    for entry in row:
        print(entry, end="\t")
    print()

Ouputs:

          Man Utd  Man City  T Hotspur
  Man Utd       1       2       1   
 Man City       0       1       0   
T Hotspur       2       4       2   

But this no longer seems any more simple than the other answers, with perhaps the benefit that it doesn't require any more imports. But @campkeith's answer already met that and is more robust as it can handle a wider variety of label lengths.

1
3

I would try to loop through the list and use a CSV formatter to represent the data you want.

You can specify tabs, commas, or any other char as the delimiter.

Otherwise, just loop through the list and print "\t" after each element

http://docs.python.org/library/csv.html

1
  • This was my initial attempt, it can probably be done, but it seems to be a lot of effort to get the formatting perfect.
    – hjweide
    Commented Mar 2, 2012 at 15:51
3

I got a better one that can save a lot of spaces.

table = [
    ['number1', 'x', 'name'],
    ["4x", "3", "Hi"],
    ["2", "1", "808890312093"],
    ["5", "Hi", "Bye"]
]
column_max_width = [max(len(row[column_index]) for row in table) for column_index in range(len(table[0]))]
row_format = ["{:>"+str(width)+"}" for width in column_max_width]
for row in table:
    print("|".join([print_format.format(value) for print_format, value in zip(row_format, row)]))

output:

number1| x|        name
     4x| 3|          Hi
      2| 1|808890312093
      5|Hi|         Bye
3

Another no-libs solution, which accounts for the longest element in each column:

def pretty_print_table(rows, line_between_rows=True):
  """
  Example Output
  ┌──────┬─────────────┬────┬───────┐
  │ True │ short       │ 77 │ catty │
  ├──────┼─────────────┼────┼───────┤
  │ 36   │ long phrase │ 9  │ dog   │
  ├──────┼─────────────┼────┼───────┤
  │ 8    │ medium      │ 3  │ zebra │
  └──────┴─────────────┴────┴───────┘
  """

  # find the max length of each column
  max_col_lens = list(map(max, zip(*[(len(str(cell)) for cell in row) for row in rows])))

  # print the table's top border
  print('┌' + '┬'.join('─' * (n + 2) for n in max_col_lens) + '┐')

  rows_separator = '├' + '┼'.join('─' * (n + 2) for n in max_col_lens) + '┤'

  row_fstring = ' │ '.join("{: <%s}" % n for n in max_col_lens)

  for i, row in enumerate(rows):
    print('│', row_fstring.format(*map(str, row)), '│')
    
    if line_between_rows and i < len(rows) - 1:
      print(rows_separator)

  # print the table's bottom border
  print('└' + '┴'.join('─' * (n + 2) for n in max_col_lens) + '┘')

Example:

rows = [
  [True, "short", 77, "catty"],
  [36, "long phrase", 9, "dog"],
  [8, 'medium', 3, "zebra"],
]

pretty_print_table(rows)

'''
┌──────┬─────────────┬────┬───────┐
│ True │ short       │ 77 │ catty │
├──────┼─────────────┼────┼───────┤
│ 36   │ long phrase │ 9  │ dog   │
├──────┼─────────────┼────┼───────┤
│ 8    │ medium      │ 3  │ zebra │
└──────┴─────────────┴────┴───────┘
'''

pretty_print_table(rows, line_between_rows=False)

'''
┌──────┬─────────────┬────┬───────┐
│ True │ short       │ 77 │ catty │
│ 36   │ long phrase │ 9  │ dog   │
│ 8    │ medium      │ 3  │ zebra │
└──────┴─────────────┴────┴───────┘
'''
1
  • The layout will be break if the cell contains emoji
    – Tai Le
    Commented May 12 at 3:08
2

To create a simple table using terminaltables open the terminal or your command prompt and run pip install terminaltables.

You can print a Python list as the following:

from terminaltables import AsciiTable

l = [
  ['Head', 'Head'],
  ['R1 C1', 'R1 C2'],
  ['R2 C1', 'R2 C2'],
  ['R3 C1', 'R3 C2']
]

table = AsciiTable(l)
print(table.table)
1

Minimal no-dependencies left-aligning Python implementation that is back-compatible with any existing print(a, "\t", b) statements:

class AlignedPrinter:
    def __init__(self):
        self._col_widths = {}
        self._lines = []

    def __del__(self):
        self.aligned_print()

    def print(self, *args):
        line = ' '.join([str(x) for x in args])
        cols = line.split('\t')
        self._lines.append(cols)
        for i in range(len(cols)):
            self._col_widths[i] = max(len(cols[i]), self._col_widths.get(i, 0))

    def aligned_print(self):
        for line in self._lines:
            aligned = []
            for i in range(len(line)):
                col = line[i]
                aligned.append(col + ' ' * (self._col_widths[i] - len(col)))
            print(' '.join(aligned))
        self.__init__()

This would allow you to easily convert mostly-working \t based prints:

print('\t', '\t'.join(teams_list))
for i in range(len(data)):
    print(teams_list[i], '\t', '\t'.join(str(x) for x in data[i]))

With:

a = AlignedPrinter()
a.print('\t', '\t'.join(teams_list))
for i in range(len(data)):
    a.print(teams_list[i], '\t', '\t'.join(str(x) for x in data[i]))
a.aligned_print()

Giving you:

            Man Utd Man City T Hotspur
Man Utd     1       2        1        
Man City    0       1        0        
T Hotspur   2       4        2        
0

matrepr does a good job with labeled matrices:

from matrepr import mprint

teams = ["Man Utd", "Man City", "T Hotspur"]
data = np.array([[1, 2, 1], [0, 1, 0], [2, 4, 2]])

mprint(data, title=False, row_labels=teams, col_labels=teams)
             Man Utd    Man City    T Hotspur
          ┌                                    ┐
  Man Utd │     1          2            1      │
 Man City │     0          1            0      │
T Hotspur │     2          4            2      │
          └                                    ┘

In addition to numpy arrays, also works with sparse matrices (scipy, pydata), and outputs to HTML and Latex.

-1
list1 = [1, 2, 3]
list2 = [10, 20, 30]

l = []

for i in range(0, len(list1)):
    l.append(list1[i]), l.append(list2[i])

# print(l)

for i in range(0, len(l), 2):
    print(l[i], "", l[i + 1])
1
  • 2
    Welcome to Stack Overflow. This question is over 10 years old and already has 19 answers, including an accepted answer and an alternate answer with a score of nearly 1,000. How does the code in this answer improve upon what's already here? Are you entirely sure it adds something new? Please read How to Answer.
    – Chris
    Commented Jun 5, 2022 at 18:34

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