165

I have a div element on my page with its height set to 100%. The height of the body is also set to 100%. The inner div has a background and all that and is different from the body background. This works for making the div height 100% of the browser screen height, but the problem is I have content inside that div that extends vertically beyond the browser screen height. When I scroll down, the div ends at the point at which you had to begin scrolling the page, but the content overflows beyond that. How do I make the div always go all the way to the bottom to fit the inner content?

Here's a simplification of my CSS:

body {
    height:100%;
    background:red;
}

#some_div {
    height:100%;
    background:black;
}

Once I scroll the page, the blackness ends and the content flows onto the red background. It doesn't seem to matter whether I set the positon to relative or absolute on the #some_div, the problem occurs either way. The content inside the #some_div is mostly absolutely positioned, and it is dynamically generated from a database so its height can't be known in advance.

Edit: Here is a screenshot of the problem: div problem

  • This was asked a few weeks ago. I'll see if I can find that question. I believe I commented on it. edit I believe your question is similar to this: stackoverflow.com/questions/9398313/… – jmbertucci Mar 2 '12 at 17:42
  • please your code for better understanding – sandeep Mar 2 '12 at 18:01
  • can you post your full code pls – Sven Bieder Mar 2 '12 at 18:06
  • 21
    You want all my thousands of lines of php code, css and javascript? I posted the portion of css that was relevant to the question... – Joey Mar 2 '12 at 18:09
  • 2
    NECROPOST IS A GO: setting the overflow property generally fixes issues like these where content inside a div is stretching past it (overflow: hidden;, overflow: scroll;, etc). – AlbertEngelB May 7 '13 at 21:35

14 Answers 14

294

Here is what you should do in the CSS style, on the main div

display: block;
overflow: auto;

And do not touch height

  • 4
    Worked great. I needed to add height: 100% to html, body and the container div to make it fill the height when there was not enough content though. – Nico Huysamen Aug 29 '13 at 8:22
  • amazing solution but you can actually touch the height if the objetive is something like a responsive window fitting – Alexis Rabago Carvajal Aug 18 '15 at 3:19
  • Is the display: block; needed? Divs are already block-level elements. – Max Heiber Sep 9 '15 at 16:46
  • it adds an inner scrollbar for me (both horizontal and vertical) – Nathan H Oct 22 '15 at 8:11
  • If you still get the parent element a little bit taller than the children elements, then check for any extra spaces and/or  , remove them. Also try to adjust the line-height. For example I've put line-height: 0, because I didn't need text, just to show an image. – Zorgatone Nov 26 '15 at 11:52
57

Set the height to auto and min-height to 100%. This should solve it for most browsers.

body {
  position: relative;
  height: auto;
  min-height: 100% !important;
}
  • 3
    IMO, this answers the question "How do I make the div always go all the way to the bottom to fit the inner content?" better than the currently marked answer, which simply turns on overflow-scrolling rather than ensuring the div/body expands to fit its content. +1 – Jammerz858 Aug 3 '14 at 12:04
  • Worked for my case. Thx! – Tyson Nero Apr 27 '17 at 14:58
  • It may be worth noting that for some reason, it doesn't work if height is 100% and min-height is auto - I would expect these to be interchangeable in this case, but looks like they aren't. – PeaBrain Dec 21 '19 at 13:07
12

Usually this problem arises when the Child elements of a Parent Div are floated. Here is the Latest Solution of the problem:

In your CSS file write the following class called .clearfix along with the pseudo selector :after

.clearfix:after {
content: "";
display: table;
clear: both;
}

Then, in your HTML, add the .clearfix class to your parent Div. For example:

<div class="clearfix">
    <div></div>
    <div></div>
</div>

It should work always. You can call the class name as .group instead of .clearfix , as it will make the code more semantic. Note that, it is Not necessary to add the dot or even a space in the value of Content between the double quotation "". Also, overflow: auto; might solve the problem but it causes other problems like showing the scroll-bar and is not recommended.

Source: Blog of Lisa Catalano and Chris Coyier

8

If you just leave the height: 100% and use display:block; the div will take as much space as the content inside the div. This way all the text will stay in the black background.

  • Where did you use display: block? I don't see that in your question. – Lightness Races in Orbit Mar 2 '12 at 17:59
  • I added it to #some_div after Ronnie suggested it, but it didn't fix the problem. – Joey Mar 2 '12 at 18:02
  • 1
    Could you try adding float: none; to the same #some_div css – RonnieVDPoel Mar 4 '12 at 16:57
  • Instead of float: none;, use clear:both;. It does the same thing but is more cross-browser, @RonnieVDPoel – Cannicide Feb 3 '17 at 22:59
5

Try this:

body { 
    min-height:100%; 
    background:red; 
} 

#some_div {
    min-height:100%; 
    background:black; 
} 

IE6 and earlier versions do not support the min-height property.

I think the problem is that when you tell the body to have a height of 100%, it's background can only be as tall as the hieght of one browser "viewport" (the viewing area that excludes the browsers toolbars & statusbars & menubars and the window edges). If the content is taller than one viewport, it will overflow the height devoted to the background.

This min-height property on the body should FORCE the background to be at least as tall as one viewport if your content does not fill one whole page down to the bottom, yet it should also let it grow downwards to encompass more interior content.

5

This question may be old, but it deserves an update. Here is another way to do that:

#yourdiv {
    display: flex;
    width:100%;
    height:100%;
}
  • 1
    If you're going to post on an old question, using current values (AKA no prefixes on flex) is recommended. – jhpratt GOFUNDME RELICENSING May 29 '18 at 3:05
  • Sorry I don't know what you are talking about. – user9459537 May 29 '18 at 4:23
  • 1
    Flex prefixes haven't been necessary for quite a while now. – jhpratt GOFUNDME RELICENSING May 29 '18 at 5:04
  • And which ones are? – user9459537 May 31 '18 at 16:28
3

Old question, but in my case i found using position:fixed solved it for me. My situation might have been a little different though. I had an overlayed semi transparent div with a loading animation in it that I needed displayed while the page was loading. So using height:auto / 100% or min-height: 100% both filled the window but not the off-screen area. Using position:fixed made this overlay scroll with the user, so it always covered the visible area and kept my preloading animation centred on the screen.

1

Just add these two line in your css id #some_div

display: block;
overflow: auto;

After that you will get what your are looking for !

0

I'm not entirely sure that I've understood the question because this is a fairly straightforward answer, but here goes... :)

Have you tried setting the overflow property of the container to visible or auto?

#some_div {
    height:100%;
    background:black; 
    overflow: visible;
    }

Adding that should push the black container to whatever size your dynamic container requires. I prefer visible to auto because auto seems to come with scroll bars...

0

Even you can do like this

display:block;
overflow:auto;
height: 100%;

This will include your each dynamic div as per the content. Suppose if you have a common div with class it will increase height of each dynamic div according to the content

0

ok I tried something like this

body (normal)

MainDiv (where all the content goes):Display:table;overflow-y:auto

its not the exact way to write it but if you make the main div display as a table it expanded and then i got scroll bars.

0

You can also use

 display: inline-block;

mine worked with this

0

OVERLAY WITHOUT POSITION:FIXED

A really cool way I've figured this out for a recent menu was setting the body to:

position: relative

and set your wrapper class like this:

#overlaywrapper {
    position: absolute;
    top: 0;
    width: 100%;
    height: 100%;
    background: #00000080;
    z-index: 100;
}

This means that you don't have to set position fixed and can still allow for scrolling. I've used this for overlaying menu's that are REALLY big.

-1

Modern browsers support the "viewport height" unit. This will expand the div to the available viewport height. I find it more reliable than any other approach.

#some_div {
    height: 100vh;
    background: black;
}

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