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I'm looking at porting a maven build to gradle. One feature of maven is pom inheritance whereby I can declare a variety of common behaviour in a pom, publish that to a repository and then use that via the <parent> element in a concrete project.

My Q is simply whether there is an equivalent behaviour in gradle?

I've previously done this in ant+ivy by importing a common build.xml which relied on either having already checked out the location of the common build.xml from source control or using something like svn:externals. I can repeat this approach without any real difficulty but this seems to be one thing maven does quite nicely so it would be nice to see something similar in gradle.

20
0

There are two possibilities:

  1. Publish a build script to a web server, and include it with apply from: "http://path/to/script.gradle"

  2. Write a Gradle plugin, publish it as a Jar to a Maven or Ivy repository, and include it with:

    buildscript {
        repositories { .. }
        dependencies "mygroup:myplugin:1.0"
    }
    
    apply plugin: "myplugin"
    

The second option is more complicated, but also somewhat more powerful. For example, plugin Jars will be cached, whereas remote build scripts currently won't. In general, I recommend to start with 1., and move to 2. if and once it becomes necessary. In the future, Gradle will likely offer a mechanism which combines the ease of use of 1. with the advantages of 2.

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  • is it possible to publish the shared build.gradle to a repository by packaging it as a plugin or just publish plugins that do stuff to a project? I can't see any examples of how to do the former and it's not obvious how one would do that. – Matt Mar 6 '12 at 0:47
  • 1
    You can publish a build script to a web server/repository accessible via HTTP, or publish a plugin to a repository. The latter is a class implementing the Plugin interface packaged as a Jar. The user guide explains how the latter is done. – Peter Niederwieser Mar 6 '12 at 8:12
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    @PeterNiederwieser I find apply from: url only works with http not https , is this documented? – Blundell Dec 4 '14 at 8:33
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    If anyone cares to do it, option number two should be expanded with how to do it, or even better, existing source code that does this. I tried doing it, and it is not straight forward for someone new to Gradle. – Yngvar Kristiansen May 28 '17 at 8:53
14
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My current solution is option 3; package the common scripts into a jar as resources and then unjar during the buildscript section like so

buildscript {
    repositories {
        // enterprise repo here
    }
    dependencies { 
        classpath 'com.foo.bar:common-build:0.1.0-SNAPSHOT'
    }
    dependencies {
        ant.unjar src: configurations.classpath.singleFile, dest: 'build/gradle'
    }
}

apply from: 'build/gradle/common.gradle'

This seems to do what I want.

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  • That's quite a hack. What do you hope to gain from it? – Peter Niederwieser Mar 8 '12 at 17:24
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    I'm not quite sure whether I should be proud at my creativeness or disgraced by my hackery. The gain is an obvious (to me) way to share a specific version of a common build that defines a standard way for a closely related (but not part of the same multiproject build) set of projects to be built. I've reduced a previous homegrown convention based ant+ivy build (that comes in at a few thousand lines of xml + all the module specific ivy.xml's) down to a few hundred lines of a common build script (that mostly deals with a v specific part of that build & has the standard deps) so I'm quite happy. – Matt Mar 8 '12 at 20:42
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    fwiw the above approach was good for prototyping but it has ultimately stabilised to a few plugins. – Matt May 11 '12 at 21:00
  • I guess this saves you having to host the script on a web server. Might try this. – JARC Aug 16 '12 at 13:02
  • This solution fails when there's multiple dependencies in the build script – Brice Mar 20 '18 at 13:51
13
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Buildings on Matt’s solution, I find the following to be a bit cleaner:

buildscript {
  repositories {
    <your repos>
  }
  dependencies {
    classpath '<your jar>'
  }
}

afterEvaluate { project -> // afterEvaluate for resolving the build script dependency
  apply from: project.buildscript.classLoader.getResource('path/to/your/resource/in/the/jar').toURI()
}

Just my two cents. :-)

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8
0

I have an answer and another question:

First, to access a shared file from a repository (i.e. Nexus) you can build a URL that includes a query:

apply from: 'http://server-url/nexus/service/local/artifact/maven/redirect?r=repository-name&g=group-name&a=build-common&e=gradle&v=LATEST'

I did this for our project and it works great. I can manage the 'build-common.gradle' file in a separate SVN project and upload it to Nexus as a SNAPSHOT. The above URL (with appropriate values inserted for 'server-url', 'repository-name', and 'group-name') finds the latest SNAPSHOT of my .gradle script I uploaded. No need to package it in a jar.

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  • Please post only the answer part as answer. – lpapp Feb 24 '14 at 17:23
7
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My version:

repositories {  
    <your repos>
}  
configurations {   
    scripts   
}  
dependencies {  
    scripts group: 'org.foo', name: 'build', version: '1.0.0', ext: 'gradle' 
    // add more scrips if needed 
}  
configurations.scripts.resolve().each { apply from: it }
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3
0

Here's an improvement to the accepted solution, for when you have more than one dependency in your buildscript:

buildscript {
    repositories {
        // Repositories
    }
    dependencies { 
        classpath 'com.foo.bar:project-extension:1.0.0'
        classpath 'com.foo.bar:some-dependency-1:2.0.0'
        classpath 'com.foo.bar:other-dependency-1:3.0.0'
    }
    dependencies {
        delete "gradle/ext"
        def jars = configurations.classpath.files as List<File>
        ant.unjar src: jars.find { it.name.matches '.*project-extension.*' }, dest: 'gradle/ext'
    }
}

apply from: 'gradle/ext/common.gradle'

Worked like a charm for me.

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  • 1
    That works even with additional dependencies, thanks ! – Brice Mar 20 '18 at 13:56
1
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I like your approach @user3394219

I wrote a small plugin doing the similar thing:

plugins {
    id "com.orctom.applyscript" version "1.1"
}
applyscript '{{groupA}}:{{nameA}}:{{versionA}}/{{path-of-fileA.gradle}}'
applyscript '{{groupA}}:{{nameA}}:{{versionA}}/{{path-of-fileB.gradle}}'
applyscript '{{groupA}}:{{nameA}}:{{versionB}}/{{path-of-fileC.gradle}}'
applyscript '{{groupC}}:{{nameD}}:{{versionE}}/{{path-of-fileX.gradle}}'

or

plugins {
    id "com.orctom.applyscript" version "1.1"
}
dependencies {
    scripts '{{groupA}}:{{nameA}}:{{versionA}}'
    scripts '{{groupA}}:{{nameA}}:{{versionB}}'
    scripts '{{groupC}}:{{nameD}}:{{versionE}}'
}

applyscript '{{nameA}}-{{versionA}}/{{path-of-fileA.gradle}}'
applyscript '{{nameA}}-{{versionA}}/{{path-of-fileB.gradle}}'
applyscript '{{nameA}}-{{versionB}}/{{path-of-fileC.gradle}}'
applyscript '{{nameD}}-{{versionE}}/{{path-of-fileX.gradle}}'

https://plugins.gradle.org/plugin/com.orctom.applyscript

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  • I wish this was working in settings.gradleduring initialization but I get Error:Cause: org.gradle.initialization.DefaultSettings_Decorated cannot be cast to org.gradle.api.Project – Ben Aug 30 '17 at 7:42
1
0

Directly reading the common script in a jar like the following way. Unpackaging the jar is not needed.

apply from: this.getClass().getClassLoader().getResource("path to dependency.gradle")

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