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Possible Duplicate:
Prevent a background process from being stopped after closing SSH client

I have a program that takes a lot of time to finish. It is running as root over ssh.
I want it to continue to run after I logout,is this possible and how would I achieve this?

  • The nohup(1) idea is better than disown IMHO because disown is a shell-specific built-in of BASH while nohup is part of coreutils and likely to be everywhere. – Brian Reiter Jun 5 '09 at 6:23
  • Use batch, e.g. echo myprogram its arguments | batch – Basile Starynkevitch Jan 2 '16 at 11:18
329

Assuming that you have a program running in the foreground, press ctrl-Z, then:

[1]+  Stopped                 myprogram
$ disown -h %1
$ bg 1
[1]+ myprogram &
$ logout

If there is only one job, then you don't need to specify the job number. Just use disown -h and bg.

Explanation of the above steps:

You press ctrl-Z. The system suspends the running program, displays a job number and a "Stopped" message and returns you to a bash prompt.

You type the disown -h %1 command (here, I've used a 1, but you'd use the job number that was displayed in the Stopped message) which marks the job so it ignores the SIGHUP signal (it will not be stopped by logging out).

Next, type the bg command using the same job number; this resumes the running of the program in the background and a message is displayed confirming that.

You can now log out and it will continue running..

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    Can you explain to me what exactly happens after each step? – omg Jun 5 '09 at 7:29
  • 13
    You press ctrl-Z. The system suspends the running program, displays a job number and a "Stopped" message and returns you to a bash prompt. You type the "disown -h %1" command (here, I've used a "1", but you'd use the job number that was displayed in the "Stopped" message) which marks the job so it ignores the SIGHUP signal (it will not be stopped by logging out). Next, type the "bg" command using the same job number. This resumes the running of the program in the background and a message is displayed confirming that. You can now log out and it will continue running... – Paused until further notice. Jun 5 '09 at 10:23
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    ...You should be aware that when you use the "bg" command the result is the same as if you'd run your program in the background with an ampersand (&). It won't have any output to stdout so it should be made to write output to a file (nohup will redirect standard output to nohup.out or ~/nohup.out if you don't redirect it yourself). – Paused until further notice. Jun 5 '09 at 10:35
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    i test it, and doesn't work.. exit when i'm logout... – Yuda Prawira Jul 6 '11 at 23:08
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    @ButtleButkus: You should be able to see them with ps x – Paused until further notice. Oct 17 '12 at 10:43
78

You should try using nohup and running it in the background:

nohup sleep 3600 &
  • This works on Mac OS X too. – Matt Connolly Feb 21 '12 at 9:07
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    Is there a way to bring this job back to foreground on logging in again? – Lord Loh. Mar 12 '12 at 21:10
  • Actually it redirects the output to nohup.out file in the same directory by default. – Gowtham Gopalakrishnan Dec 28 '15 at 8:52
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    @LordLoh. Afaik, the only practical way to do this is to use tmux or screen. – James M. Lay Feb 11 '16 at 21:20
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    this worked much better, thanks! I just say nohup <my program> and then CTRL-Z + bg Then I can logout. You can validate that it still runs by having another ssh looking at top and see the process keep going – Hulvej May 3 '16 at 7:26
40

I would try the program screen.

  • 2
    While screen is a mighty nice tool, nohup is probably better suited for this task. Screen is only needed when you require the program to be interactive, and to be able to go back to the application at a later time. To be entirely honest, I often find myself using screen for the exact same reason as the question above. – wvdschel Jun 5 '09 at 5:59
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    Even with non-interactive task, it's nice to see that the program finished without errors. It's also good practice to always use screen in case of disconnection. – brunoqc Jun 5 '09 at 6:45
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    alternative to screen would be tmux – rubo77 Oct 8 '12 at 13:13
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    This is the poster child for why link-only answers should never be used. – mbroshi Jun 23 '14 at 14:40
  • I know this is an old answer, but it has been flagged as a link-only answer and in fact the link is dead. Would it be possible to expand it out to show a brief example of how to use screen, perhaps from the originally linked example (still available at web.archive.org/web/20090106170543/http://www.rackaid.com/…)? – josliber Dec 21 '15 at 5:16
14

Start in the background:

./long_running_process options &

And disown the job before you log out:

disown
  • but the programme has already started to run.. – omg Jun 5 '09 at 5:21
  • And will it contine to run as root? – omg Jun 5 '09 at 5:35
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    If the program is already running on the console and you can access the console it's running on hit "Ctrl+Z" to send it in the background and then disown the newly created job. As long as a process is started as root it will continue to run as root unless it drops privileges itself. – diciu Jun 5 '09 at 5:49
  • But the command is named 'disown',isn't that to say root will disown the program,and the program will not continue to run as root ? – omg Jun 5 '09 at 5:51
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    "disown" is just for abandoning control of a job it does not change the privileges of the process. – diciu Jun 5 '09 at 5:52
13

You want nohup. See http://nixcraft.com/linux-software/313-ssh-nohup-connection.html

3

You could use screen, detach and reattach

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