192

Is there a way to tell AutoMapper to ignore all of the properties except the ones which are mapped explicitly?

I have external DTO classes which are likely to change from the outside and I want to avoid specifying each property to be ignored explicitly, since adding new properties will break the functionality (cause exceptions) when trying to map them into my own objects.

  • 1
    with the ValueInjecter valueinjecter.codeplex.com/documentation you create ValueInjections that have their mapping alghorithm and map between specific properties, and they don't care about the rest of the properties – Omu May 5 '10 at 18:38
  • 19
    For those using Automapper > version 5, skip down to see answers detailing .ForAllOtherMembers(opts => opts.Ignore()) – Schneider Oct 21 '16 at 0:48
  • @Schneider ".ForAllOtherMembers(opts => opts.Ignore())" is different with the extension "IgnoreAllNonExisting" here, the main difference is if you did not config property explicitly, with ".ForAllOtherMembers(opts => opts.Ignore())" you will get nothing mapped. use "IgnoreAllNonExisting" without config property explicitly, you still get some property mapped(properties with same name) with value. – Dragon Jan 13 '17 at 5:58
  • Yes. The ForAllOtherMembers is the answer. The IgnoreUnmapped answers don't do anything except cause the config-valid-assert to pass, because unmapped members are ignored anyway. – N73k Jun 2 '17 at 3:17

16 Answers 16

81

This is an extension method I wrote that ignores all non existing properties on the destination. Not sure if it will still be useful as the question is more than two years old, but I ran into the same issue having to add a lot of manual Ignore calls.

public static IMappingExpression<TSource, TDestination> IgnoreAllNonExisting<TSource, TDestination>
(this IMappingExpression<TSource, TDestination> expression)
{
    var flags = BindingFlags.Public | BindingFlags.Instance;
    var sourceType = typeof (TSource);
    var destinationProperties = typeof (TDestination).GetProperties(flags);

    foreach (var property in destinationProperties)
    {
        if (sourceType.GetProperty(property.Name, flags) == null)
        {
            expression.ForMember(property.Name, opt => opt.Ignore());
        }
    }
    return expression;
}

Usage:

Mapper.CreateMap<SourceType, DestinationType>()
                .IgnoreAllNonExisting();

UPDATE: Apparently this does not work correctly if you have custom mappings because it overwrites them. I guess it could still work if call IgnoreAllNonExisting first and then the custom mappings later.

schdr has a solution (as an answer to this question) which uses Mapper.GetAllTypeMaps() to find out which properties are unmapped and auto ignore them. Seems like a more robust solution to me.

  • I haven't used AutoMapper for some time, but I'll accept your answer if it works for you :). – Igor Brejc Jun 9 '11 at 4:07
  • 2
    Thanks!! I found this very handy. Ignoring properties individually was defeating the purpose of using automapper in my situation. – Daniel Robinson Jul 8 '11 at 15:08
  • See the next answer for one that doesnt have the overwrite problem – Jason Coyne Aug 7 '12 at 19:28
  • 3
    This method should be on the autoMapper native code! Very nice, thank you! – Felipe Oriani Apr 17 '13 at 15:00
  • 2
    FYI, Jimmy himself (writer of AutoMapper) has commented below that @nazim's answer is correct for version 5+ – Worthy7 Jun 1 '18 at 1:15
220

I've updated Can Gencer's extension to not overwrite any existing maps.

public static IMappingExpression<TSource, TDestination> 
    IgnoreAllNonExisting<TSource, TDestination>(this IMappingExpression<TSource, TDestination> expression)
{
    var sourceType = typeof (TSource);
    var destinationType = typeof (TDestination);
    var existingMaps = Mapper.GetAllTypeMaps().First(x => x.SourceType.Equals(sourceType) && x.DestinationType.Equals(destinationType));
    foreach (var property in existingMaps.GetUnmappedPropertyNames())
    {
        expression.ForMember(property, opt => opt.Ignore());
    }
    return expression;
}

Usage:

Mapper.CreateMap<SourceType, DestinationType>()
                .ForMember(prop => x.Property, opt => opt.MapFrom(src => src.OtherProperty))
                .IgnoreAllNonExisting();
  • 4
    +1, Thanks to you for posting this solution. It tooked me hours for figuring weird bug when I use solution in goo.gl/rG7SL, until I stumble to this post again. – Nordin Jul 13 '11 at 10:05
  • 3
    I recommend Yohanb's method below over this. There are some corner cases that this doesn't work for it appears. – Jon Barker Aug 4 '14 at 14:00
  • 3
    Can this be done in AutoMapper 4.2? (The Mapper.GetAllTypeMaps() is deprecated) – mrmashal Feb 13 '16 at 5:14
  • 14
    For AutoMapper 5+ version just replace Mapper.GetAllTypeMaps() with Mapper.Configuration.GetAllTypeMaps(). Here is the reference github.com/AutoMapper/AutoMapper/issues/1252 – Sergey Nov 3 '16 at 15:07
  • 5
    For new people reading this. This answer is for AutoMapper 2 and at the time of writing this comment we are at version 6. This is a hack and a much cleaner way is using MemberList enum. See Github issue 1839 and a better solution. github.com/AutoMapper/AutoMapper/issues/1839 So example: stackoverflow.com/a/31182390/3850405 – Ogglas Jul 7 '17 at 9:06
204

From what I understood the question was that there are fields on the destination which doesn't have a mapped field in the source, which is why you are looking for ways to Ignore those non mapped destination fields.

Instead of implementing and using these extension method you could simply use

Mapper.CreateMap<destinationModel, sourceModel>(MemberList.Source);  

Now the automapper knows that it needs to only validate that all the source fields are mapped but not the other way around.

You can also use:

Mapper.CreateMap<destinationModel, sourceModel>(MemberList.Destination);  
  • 10
    This answer should have more upvotes, maybe even be marked as the answer. It solved my problem and similarly MemberList.Destination would solve ops problem. – Tedd Hansen Jan 12 '16 at 12:25
  • It won't work if you want to ignore few properties on both source and destination :) – KManohar Jan 27 '16 at 22:05
  • @KManohar why would you want to ignore on both the source and destination? AutoMapper only validates one side or the other. – Jimmy Bogard Jun 28 '16 at 13:07
  • 53
    To anyone that comes later, THIS IS THE CORRECT ANSWER FOR 5.0 – Jimmy Bogard Dec 5 '16 at 20:16
  • 3
    looks nifty but did not work for me.. i tried Source and Destination, but it keeps complaining about the same property object missing a map – Sonic Soul Apr 6 '18 at 21:35
82

I've been able to do this the following way:

Mapper.CreateMap<SourceType, DestinationType>().ForAllMembers(opt => opt.Ignore());
Mapper.CreateMap<SourceType, DestinationType>().ForMember(/*Do explicit mapping 1 here*/);
Mapper.CreateMap<SourceType, DestinationType>().ForMember(/*Do explicit mapping 2 here*/);
...

Note: I'm using AutoMapper v.2.0.

  • 4
    thank you so much! it works like a charm. i tried first to chain the calls but ForAllMembers just return void :(. It wasn't obvious that a preceding IgnoreAll can be modified later. – SeriousM Oct 17 '12 at 12:00
  • Yes this should be the accepted answer – Arnold Pistorius Sep 28 '17 at 14:44
  • 4
    I don't like this way either.. if you have 50 members, and you want to ignore 25.. then what's the point of automapper if you still gotta ignore 25 members. If names match, and there are properties that dont match.. why not make it clear to tell automapper to not match on unmapped properties and by passing all the typing? – sksallaj Sep 13 '18 at 20:08
58

Version 5.0.0-beta-1 of AutoMapper introduces the ForAllOtherMembers extension method so you can now do this:

CreateMap<Source, Destination>()
    .ForMember(d => d.Text, o => o.MapFrom(s => s.Name))
    .ForMember(d => d.Value, o => o.MapFrom(s => s.Id))
    .ForAllOtherMembers(opts => opts.Ignore());

Be aware that there is an advantage to explicitly mapping each property as you will never get problems of mapping failing silently that arise when you forget to map a property.

Perhaps in your case it might be wise to ignore all other members and add a TODO to come back and make these explicit after the frequency of changes to this class settle down.

  • 3
    Amazing this took until version 5. Look how many up -votes and attempted answers to this question...something wrong with Automapper's governance I wonder? – Schneider Oct 21 '16 at 0:49
  • Thank you for this, took me awhile to scroll down to it but this, but it works perfectly. – cobolstinks Feb 10 '17 at 14:44
  • 1
    You can even put the ForAllOtherMembers line first and things will work the same, which is good if you have some kind of base class configuration. – N73k Jun 2 '17 at 15:07
  • This is now the preferred approach. Wonder if the OP could change the accepted answer? – Chase Florell Nov 7 '17 at 23:52
  • 1
    Is there an equivalent to ignore the properties in the source object? Something like ForAllOtherSourceMembers? – SuperJMN Apr 4 at 8:42
43

As of AutoMapper 5.0, the .TypeMap property on IMappingExpression is gone, meaning the 4.2 solution no longer works. I've created a solution which uses the original functionality but with a different syntax:

var config = new MapperConfiguration(cfg =>
{
    cfg.CreateMap<Src, Dest>();
    cfg.IgnoreUnmapped();        // Ignores unmapped properties on all maps
    cfg.IgnoreUnmapped<Src, Dest>();  // Ignores unmapped properties on specific map
});

// or add  inside a profile
public class MyProfile : Profile
{
   this.IgnoreUnmapped();
   CreateMap<MyType1, MyType2>();
}

Implementation:

public static class MapperExtensions
{
    private static void IgnoreUnmappedProperties(TypeMap map, IMappingExpression expr)
    {
        foreach (string propName in map.GetUnmappedPropertyNames())
        {
            if (map.SourceType.GetProperty(propName) != null)
            {
                expr.ForSourceMember(propName, opt => opt.Ignore());
            }
            if (map.DestinationType.GetProperty(propName) != null)
            {
                expr.ForMember(propName, opt => opt.Ignore());
            }
        }
    }

    public static void IgnoreUnmapped(this IProfileExpression profile)
    {
        profile.ForAllMaps(IgnoreUnmappedProperties);
    }

    public static void IgnoreUnmapped(this IProfileExpression profile, Func<TypeMap, bool> filter)
    {
        profile.ForAllMaps((map, expr) =>
        {
            if (filter(map))
            {
                IgnoreUnmappedProperties(map, expr);
            }
        });
    }

    public static void IgnoreUnmapped(this IProfileExpression profile, Type src, Type dest)
    {
        profile.IgnoreUnmapped((TypeMap map) => map.SourceType == src && map.DestinationType == dest);
    }

    public static void IgnoreUnmapped<TSrc, TDest>(this IProfileExpression profile)
    {
        profile.IgnoreUnmapped(typeof(TSrc), typeof(TDest));
    }
}
  • 3
    How would you use this in a chained CreateMap<TSource,TDest>() expression in a Profile? – jmoerdyk Jul 7 '16 at 18:35
  • 2
    Thanks for this. The GetUnmappedPropertyNames method returns all unmapped property names, on both the source and destination, which seems to be break on a reverse map, so I had to make a small change to IgnoreUnmapped to check if the unmapped property was on the source or destination and ignore accordingly. Here's a fiddle demonstrating the problem and the update: dotnetfiddle.net/vkRGJv – Mun Jul 25 '16 at 21:48
  • 1
    I've updated my answer to include your findings - I don't use Source mappings so hadn't come across this! Thanks. – Richard Jul 26 '16 at 11:48
  • 1
    This doesn't work on PCL without reflection available, GetProperty(propName) doesn't exist. – George Taskos Oct 1 '16 at 23:22
  • I don't see how this is a solution to the question, or how this even does anything. Unmapped properties are already going to be ignored - because they are unmapped. The poster said "how do you ignore props unless they are explicitly mapped". That means that if I have Src.MyProp and Dest.MyProp, that mapping should be ignored unless there was an explicit call to MapFrom & ForMember for MyProp. So, the default mapping needs to be ignored. The only thing this solution does is to cause the config-valid-assert thing to pass - which you don't need anyway for the mapping to work. – N73k Jun 2 '17 at 3:03
17

There's been a few years since the question has been asked, but this extension method seems cleaner to me, using current version of AutoMapper (3.2.1):

public static IMappingExpression<TSource, TDestination> IgnoreUnmappedProperties<TSource, TDestination>(this IMappingExpression<TSource, TDestination> expression)
{
    var typeMap = Mapper.FindTypeMapFor<TSource, TDestination>();
    if (typeMap != null)
    {
        foreach (var unmappedPropertyName in typeMap.GetUnmappedPropertyNames())
        {
            expression.ForMember(unmappedPropertyName, opt => opt.Ignore());
        }
    }

    return expression;
}
16

For those who are using the non-static API in version 4.2.0 and above, the following extension method (found here in the AutoMapperExtensions class) can be used:

// from http://stackoverflow.com/questions/954480/automapper-ignore-the-rest/6474397#6474397
public static IMappingExpression IgnoreAllNonExisting(this IMappingExpression expression)
{
    foreach(var property in expression.TypeMap.GetUnmappedPropertyNames())
    {
        expression.ForMember(property, opt => opt.Ignore());
    }
    return expression;
}

The important thing here is that once the static API is removed, code such as Mapper.FindTypeMapFor will no longer work, hence the use of the expression.TypeMap field.

  • 6
    As of 5.0, expression.TypeMap is no longer available. Here's my solution for 5.0 – Richard Jun 28 '16 at 10:31
  • I had to use public static IMappingExpression<TSource, TDestination> IgnoreAllNonExisting<TSource, TDestination>(this IMappingExpression<TSource, TDestination> expression) to fix type issues. – Nick M Jun 26 '18 at 4:14
16

For Automapper 5.0 in order to skip all unmapped properties you just need put

.ForAllOtherMembers(x=>x.Ignore());

at the end of your profile.

For example:

internal class AccountInfoEntityToAccountDtoProfile : Profile
{
    public AccountInfoEntityToAccountDtoProfile()
    {
        CreateMap<AccountInfoEntity, AccountDto>()
           .ForMember(d => d.Id, e => e.MapFrom(s => s.BankAcctInfo.BankAcctFrom.AcctId))
           .ForAllOtherMembers(x=>x.Ignore());
    }
}

In this case only Id field for output object will be resolved all other will be skipped. Works like a charm, seems we don't need any tricky extensions anymore!

10

I have updated Robert Schroeder's answer for AutoMapper 4.2. With non-static mapper configurations, we can't use Mapper.GetAllTypeMaps(), but the expression has a reference to the required TypeMap:

public static IMappingExpression<TSource, TDestination> 
    IgnoreAllNonExisting<TSource, TDestination>(this IMappingExpression<TSource, TDestination> expression)
{
    foreach (var property in expression.TypeMap.GetUnmappedPropertyNames())
    {
        expression.ForMember(property, opt => opt.Ignore());
    }
    return expression;
}
  • Doesn't work in AutoMapper 5.0. The .TypeMap property on IMappingExpression is not available. For 5.+ version see extensions in Richard's answer – Michael Freidgeim Jul 17 '16 at 13:21
  • Works with AM 4.2 – Leszek P Jul 31 '18 at 13:49
8

How would you prefer to specify that certain members be ignored? Is there a convention, or base class, or attribute you would like to apply? Once you get into the business of specifying all the mappings explicitly, I'm not sure what value you'd get out of AutoMapper.

  • Jimmy, you have a point about explicitness. As for the way on how to achieve this in a most elegant way: base classes and attributes would not work in this situation, since the target classes aren't really under my control - they are autogenerated from XSD data contract, so one would have to manually edit this code after each generation cycle. I guess the solution depends on a concrete case. Maybe a fluent interface similar to the one Windsor Castle provides for selecting which components to register in the container could be a solution? – Igor Brejc Jun 5 '09 at 17:41
  • Ah that makes more sense now. That's an interesting feature, I'll look at that one in the 2.1 timeframe. – Jimmy Bogard Aug 3 '10 at 13:32
  • 2
    How about just having a configurable value where you can "ignore" all non-existing fields. – Ricardo Sanchez Aug 25 '11 at 14:48
  • 6
    This is not an answer to the question. – user2864740 Mar 9 '15 at 17:00
  • Hi Jimmy, You're the author, correct? I'd like to be able to ignore all non existing properties being a default behavior (may be controlled by a flag). Also, I'm having a strange error from AutoMapper I am unable to figure out. It doesn't give me any specifics. – Naomi May 13 '16 at 1:52
7

This seems an old question but thought I would post my answer for anyone else looking like I was.

I use ConstructUsing, object initializer coupled with ForAllMembers ignore e.g

    Mapper.CreateMap<Source, Target>()
        .ConstructUsing(
            f =>
                new Target
                    {
                        PropVal1 = f.PropVal1,
                        PropObj2 = Map<PropObj2Class>(f.PropObj2),
                        PropVal4 = f.PropVal4
                    })
        .ForAllMembers(a => a.Ignore());
1

The only infromation about ignoring many of members is this thread - http://groups.google.com/group/automapper-users/browse_thread/thread/9928ce9f2ffa641f . I think you can use the trick used in ProvidingCommonBaseClassConfiguration to ignore common properties for similar classes.
And there is no information about the "Ignore the rest" functionality. I've looked at the code before and it seems to me that will be very and very hard to add such functionality. Also you can try to use some attribute and mark with it ignored properties and add some generic/common code to ignore all marked properties.

  • 1
    Perhaps one way would be to use ForAllMembers method and implement my own IMemberConfigurationExpression which receives a string containing the property names of those properties which should not be ignored, and then go through the rest of them and call Ignore(). Just an idea, I'm not sure if it would work. – Igor Brejc Jun 5 '09 at 10:40
  • Yes, this can work too, but this method is more tricky than using attributes but it offers more flexibility. It's a pity that there are no silver bullet :(. – zihotki Jun 5 '09 at 14:00
1

I know this is an old question, but @jmoerdyk in your question:

How would you use this in a chained CreateMap() expression in a Profile?

you can use this answer like this inside the Profile ctor

this.IgnoreUnmapped();
CreateMap<TSource, Tdestination>(MemberList.Destination)
.ForMember(dest => dest.SomeProp, opt => opt.MapFrom(src => src.OtherProp));
0

You can use ForAllMembers, than overwrite only needed like this

public static IMappingExpression<TSource, TDest> IgnoreAll<TSource, TDest>(this IMappingExpression<TSource, TDest> expression)
        {
            expression.ForAllMembers(opt => opt.Ignore());
            return expression;
        }

Be carefull, it will ignore all, and if you will not add custom mapping, they are already ignore and will not work

also, i want to say, if you have unit test for AutoMapper. And you test that all models with all properties mapped correctly you shouldn't use such extension method

you should write ignore's explicitly

-2

In version of 3.3.1 you simply can use IgnoreAllPropertiesWithAnInaccessibleSetter() or IgnoreAllSourcePropertiesWithAnInaccessibleSetter() methods.

  • 6
    This doesn't work per the original poster's question. These methods only ignore protected or private properties, not properties that are missing from the source but present in the destination type. – Dan May 1 '15 at 16:03

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