69

I know how to add a list column:

> df <- data.frame(a=1:3)
> df$b <- list(1:1, 1:2, 1:3)
> df
  a       b
1 1       1
2 2    1, 2
3 3 1, 2, 3

This works, but not:

> df <- data.frame(a=1:3, b=list(1:1, 1:2, 1:3))
Error in data.frame(1L, 1:2, 1:3, check.names = FALSE, stringsAsFactors = TRUE) : 
  arguments imply differing number of rows: 1, 2, 3

Why?

Also, is there a way to create df (above) in a single call to data.frame?

88

Slightly obscurely, from ?data.frame:

If a list or data frame or matrix is passed to ‘data.frame’ it is as if each component or column had been passed as a separate argument (except for matrices of class ‘"model.matrix"’ and those protected by ‘I’).

So

data.frame(a=1:3,b=I(list(1,1:2,1:3)))

seems to work.

  • 11
    For those interested, "I" means "Inhibit Interperetation/Conversion of objects". It creates an identical object but with "AsIs" appended to the set of classes. The "AsIs" class is really there just to be read by the data.frame() and formula() functions. Learn more here. – pwilcox May 1 '17 at 16:49
  • 1
    amazing, thanks for the solution. though just I for Inhibit Interperetation/Conversion of objects seems a bit too short :) – sertsedat Nov 7 '18 at 11:08
32

If you are working with data.tables, then you can avoid the call to I()

library(data.table)
# the following works as intended
data.table(a=1:3,b=list(1,1:2,1:3))

   a     b
1: 1     1
2: 2   1,2
3: 3 1,2,3
  • This is an underappreciated feature of data.table by a wide margin – data princess Feb 5 '18 at 19:18
20

data_frames (variously called tibbles, tbl_df, tbl) natively support the creation of list columns using the data_frame constructor. To use them, load one of the many libraries with them such as tibble, dplyr or tidyverse.

> data_frame(abc = letters[1:3], lst = list(1:3, 1:3, 1:3))
# A tibble: 3 × 2
    abc       lst
  <chr>    <list>
1     a <int [3]>
2     b <int [3]>
3     c <int [3]>

They are actually data.frames under the hood, but somewhat modified. They can almost always be used as normal data.frames. The only exception I've found is that when people do inappropriate class checks, they cause problems:

> #no problem
> data.frame(x = 1:3, y = 1:3) %>% class
[1] "data.frame"
> data.frame(x = 1:3, y = 1:3) %>% class == "data.frame"
[1] TRUE
> #uh oh
> data_frame(x = 1:3, y = 1:3) %>% class
[1] "tbl_df"     "tbl"        "data.frame"
> data_frame(x = 1:3, y = 1:3) %>% class == "data.frame"
[1] FALSE FALSE  TRUE
> #dont use if with improper testing!
> if(data_frame(x = 1:3, y = 1:3) %>% class == "data.frame") "something"
Warning message:
In if (data_frame(x = 1:3, y = 1:3) %>% class == "data.frame") "something" :
  the condition has length > 1 and only the first element will be used
> #proper
> data_frame(x = 1:3, y = 1:3) %>% inherits("data.frame")
[1] TRUE

I recommending reading about them in R 4 Data Science (free).

  • 1
    R is moving and growing and I think this is the 2018 answer to the question and somehow it should be marked as such. – Fitzroy Hogsflesh Oct 30 '18 at 9:41

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