3

here is my shell script:

#!/bin/sh
exec 100>&1
exec 1>hello.txt
echo "hello exec"
echo "hello world"
exec 1>&100 100>&-

but when I run it, the system prompts that:

exec: 2: 100: not found

And when I use the command lsof to check the info of its file descriptor, it prompts that:

 lsof -p 31931 -d 100
COMMAND     PID   USER   FD   TYPE     DEVICE SIZE/OFF    NODE NAME
dbus-daem  1230 kaiwii  100u  unix 0x00000000      0t0 3753938 socket
bash      31931 kaiwii  cwd    DIR        8,7     4096 6316395 /home/kaiwii/test
bash      31931 kaiwii  rtd    DIR        8,7     4096       2 /
bash      31931 kaiwii  txt    REG        8,7   822420 8208388 /bin/bash
bash      31931 kaiwii  mem    REG        8,7  1434180 1688385 /lib/i386-linux-gnu/libc-2.13.so
bash      31931 kaiwii  mem    REG        8,7    38500 1688435 /lib/i386-linux-gnu/libnss_nis-2.13.so
bash      31931 kaiwii  mem    REG        8,7    79672 1688425 /lib/i386-linux-gnu/libnsl-2.13.so
bash      31931 kaiwii  mem    REG        8,7    26400 1688427 /lib/i386-linux-gnu/libnss_compat-2.13.so
bash      31931 kaiwii  mem    REG        8,7   117960 1688372 /lib/i386-linux-gnu/ld-2.13.so
bash      31931 kaiwii  mem    REG        8,7     9736 1688395 /lib/i386-linux-gnu/libdl-2.13.so
bash      31931 kaiwii  mem    REG        8,7   223468 1687611 /lib/libncurses.so.5.7
bash      31931 kaiwii  mem    REG        8,7    42580 1688431 /lib/i386-linux-gnu/libnss_files-2.13.so
bash      31931 kaiwii  mem    REG        8,7   123384 5685786 /usr/share/locale-langpack/zh_CN/LC_MESSAGES/bash.mo
bash      31931 kaiwii  mem    REG        8,7  8322432  319489 /usr/lib/locale/locale-archive
bash      31931 kaiwii    0r   CHR      136,0      0t0       3 /dev/pts/0
bash      31931 kaiwii    1u   CHR      136,0      0t0       3 /dev/pts/0
bash      31931 kaiwii    2u   CHR      136,0      0t0       3 /dev/pts/0
bash      31931 kaiwii  255u   CHR      136,0      0t0       3 /dev/pts/0

For the sake that I am not familiar to the command exec especially about how to revise the file descriptor, I have no idea what happened! By the way, when I change the file descriptor 100 to 8, it runs okay!

5
  • What are you trying to exec? - what are you expecting? – John3136 Mar 5 '12 at 3:43
  • @John3136: The exec builtin provides a mechanism for redirecting input and output to file descriptors. – Adam Liss Mar 5 '12 at 3:48
  • Adam, I know - I even know how to use it ;-) I just think the OP could have been a bit clearer about what they were trying to do. – John3136 Mar 5 '12 at 3:53
  • @John3136:any idea?And by the way,what does the OP mean? – kaiwii ho Mar 5 '12 at 6:33
  • OP is "original poster" - used by people (like me) who are too lazy to scroll up to find the user name of the person asking the question ;-) – John3136 Mar 5 '12 at 23:40
1

This is because you're running the script with /bin/sh which probably links to dash or other minimal shell interpreter. XCU 2.7 Redirection says:

Open files are represented by decimal numbers starting with zero. The largest possible value is implementation-defined; however, all implementations shall support at least 0 to 9, inclusive, for use by the application.

So some of these implementations support maximum 9 fd.

If you want to use more, use a full featured shell like bash, change /bin/sh with /bin/bash

0
0

From the GNU bash manual at http://www.gnu.org/software/bash/manual/bashref.html#Redirections:

Redirections using file descriptors greater than 9 should be used with care, as they may conflict with file descriptors the shell uses internally.


In general, only the first 3 descriptors are assigned by the system:

  • 0 = stdin, usually input from a terminal
  • 1 = stdout, usually output to a terminal
  • 2 = stderr, also usually output to a terminal, but reserved for error messages so they don't get sent down a pipe accidentally.

You're free to use the higher numbers.

1
  • :So u mean it's because of the conflict?i share the same idea of u.But,would u show me how to pretend for such conflict,i mean ,how the check the conflict?thx – kaiwii ho Mar 5 '12 at 6:37

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.