92

This may seem silly and downright stupid but I can't seem to figure out how to check the value of a radio button group in my HTML form via JavaScript. I have the following code:

<input type="radio" id="genderm" name="gender" value="male" />
<label for="genderm">Male</label>
<input type="radio" id="genderf" name="gender" value="female" />
<label for="genderf">Female</label>

How do I retrieve the value of gender via JavaScript?

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9 Answers 9

320

Use document.querySelector() if you want to avoid frameworks (which I almost always want to do).

document.querySelector('input[name="gender"]:checked').value
5
  • 26
    This needs more upvotes, .querySelector() is the vanilla answer to so many jQuery questions...
    – Marian
    Nov 18, 2016 at 3:47
  • 5
    This is a first, I have never before, logged in just to give someone an up vote. Mar 25, 2017 at 15:07
  • 2
    @Misunderstood same here. Had to log in to vote this up
    – Courtney
    Jan 24, 2018 at 19:44
  • 4
    This answer makes me sorry that the answer for a question cannot be later changed by the community or moderators. Of course, with all due respect to the chosen answer (towards both individuals involved in that decision).
    – Axonn
    Jun 8, 2018 at 23:41
  • I love this answer. No need for cumbersome frameworks if you know what you're doing. :-) Jun 24, 2021 at 0:17
103

In pure Javascript:

var genders = document.getElementsByName("gender");
var selectedGender;

for(var i = 0; i < genders.length; i++) {
   if(genders[i].checked)
       selectedGender = genders[i].value;
 }

update

In pure Javascript without loop, using newer (and potentially not-yet-supported) RadioNodeList :

var form_elements = document.getElementById('my_form').elements;
var selectedGender = form_elements['gender'].value;

The only catch is that RadioNodeList is only returned by the HTMLFormElement.elements or HTMLFieldSetElement.elements property, so you have to have some identifier for the form or fieldset that the radio inputs are wrapped in to grab it first.

1
  • 45
    Plus one for answering the title and not providing a jQuery answer.
    – driechel
    Dec 9, 2014 at 11:20
67

If you are using a javascript library like jQuery, it's very easy:

alert($('input[name=gender]:checked').val());

This code will select the checked input with gender name, and gets it's value. Simple isn't it?

Live demo

6
  • 96
    The question was "Javascript", not "jQuery".
    – MattiSG
    Feb 11, 2016 at 8:19
  • 3
    @MattiSG, and since it was accepted, I guess it helped the questioner(and many other people)... Feb 11, 2016 at 9:09
  • 15
    Well, I came across this question looking for a Javascript solution, the question is not tagged jQuery, when I read the question it was not mentioning jQuery, I don't think the accepted answer should have a dependency on jQuery. But that's the power of the crowd, you know ;) My own down vote won't change much for all the many other people who you helped with this answer :)
    – MattiSG
    Feb 12, 2016 at 9:46
  • check the answers from @darelf for pure js..!! Jul 14, 2016 at 12:59
  • 1
    JQuery was okay back then. Apr 13, 2017 at 13:43
9

To get the value you would do this:

document.getElementById("genderf").value;

But to check, whether the radio button is checked or selected:

document.getElementById("genderf").checked;
4
  • 1
    That wasn't the question. you cannot use ID here since you do not know the id, or you might have countless radio buttons, but you want to know which value will be sent to the server (the selected value of the group). So this answer doesn't really answers the question
    – vsync
    Jul 25, 2015 at 20:52
  • @vsync Not sure what you mean, the OP says nothing about servers and asks (1) in his title how to check the value and (2) how to retrieve the value, both of which I've answered based on the code the OP provided.
    – gideon
    Dec 21, 2016 at 8:29
  • I see I didn't explain it very well: what you proposed will never ever work and doesn't even make sense. you absolutely cannot use getElementById in this situation. see this answer.
    – vsync
    Dec 21, 2016 at 19:19
  • id arise the problem while getting the value,i have two id in same name it gets only 1st id value not second one
    – ßãlãjî
    May 6, 2020 at 15:59
7

If you wrap your form elements in a form tag with a name attribute you can easily get the value using document.formName.radioGroupName.value.

<form name="myForm">
    <input type="radio" id="genderm" name="gender" value="male" />
    <label for="genderm">Male</label>
    <input type="radio" id="genderf" name="gender" value="female" />
    <label for="genderf">Female</label>
</form>

<script>
    var selected = document.forms.myForm.gender.value;
</script>
4
  • This appears to have cross browser issues.
    – jfriend00
    Jan 23, 2016 at 18:51
  • This no longer seems to work in Chrome either. I'm sure it did once. :( Feb 11, 2016 at 8:59
  • 1
    you forgot .forms and .elements! so it should be document.forms.myForm.gender.value
    – kal
    Nov 14, 2016 at 4:19
  • Your answer seems so much easier to understand than the others thanks :).
    – Liam
    Sep 4, 2019 at 16:24
3

Try:


var selectedVal;

for( i = 0; i < document.form_name.gender.length; i++ )
{
  if(document.form_name.gender[i].checked)
    selectedVal = document.form_name.gender[i].value; //male or female
    break;
  }
}

3

Another solution for ES5+

[...document.getElementsByName("gender")].find(input => input.checked).value;
1

Without loop:

document.getElementsByName('gender').reduce(function(value, checkable) {
    if(checkable.checked == true) 
        value = checkable.value; 
    return value;
}, '');

reduce is just a function that will feed sequentially array elements to second argument of callback, and previously returned function to value, while for the first run, it will use value of second argument.

The only minus of this approach is that reduce will traverse every element returned by getElementsByName even after it have found selected radio button.

-3

function myFunction() {
document.getElementById("text").value='male'
 document.getElementById("myCheck_2").checked = false;
  var checkBox = document.getElementById("myCheck");
  var text = document.getElementById("text");
  if (checkBox.checked == true){
    text.style.display = "block";
  } else {
     text.style.display = "none";
  }
}
function myFunction_2() {
document.getElementById("text").value='female'
 document.getElementById("myCheck").checked = false;
  var checkBox = document.getElementById("myCheck_2");
  var text = document.getElementById("text");
  if (checkBox.checked == true){
    text.style.display = "block";
  } else {
     text.style.display = "none";
  }
}
Male: <input type="checkbox" id="myCheck"  onclick="myFunction()">
Female: <input type="checkbox" id="myCheck_2"  onclick="myFunction_2()">

<input type="text" id="text" placeholder="Name">

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