82

I have a data.frame like this:

df <- read.csv(text = "ONE,TWO,THREE
                       23,234,324
                       34,534,12
                       56,324,124
                       34,234,124
                       123,534,654")

I want to produce a percent bar plot which looks like this (made in LibreOffice Calc): enter image description here

Thus, the bars should be standarized so all stacks have the same height and sums to 100%. So far all I have been able to get is is a stacked barplot (not percent), using:

barplot(as.matrix(df))

Any help?

5 Answers 5

134

Here's a solution using that ggplot package (version 3.x) in addition to what you've gotten so far.

We use the position argument of geom_bar set to position = "fill". You may also use position = position_fill() if you want to use the arguments of position_fill() (vjust and reverse).

Note that your data is in a 'wide' format, whereas ggplot2 requires it to be in a 'long' format. Thus, we first need to gather the data.

library(ggplot2)
library(dplyr)
library(tidyr)

dat <- read.table(text = "    ONE TWO THREE
1   23  234 324
2   34  534 12
3   56  324 124
4   34  234 124
5   123 534 654",sep = "",header = TRUE)

# Add an id variable for the filled regions and reshape
datm <- dat %>% 
  mutate(ind = factor(row_number())) %>%  
  gather(variable, value, -ind)

ggplot(datm, aes(x = variable, y = value, fill = ind)) + 
    geom_bar(position = "fill",stat = "identity") +
    # or:
    # geom_bar(position = position_fill(), stat = "identity") 
    scale_y_continuous(labels = scales::percent_format())

example figure

16
  • 1
    what package is melt() part of? Is it reshape2?
    – Julio Diaz
    Mar 5, 2012 at 19:59
  • 3
    Yes; my apologies. For such a long time ggplot2 loaded those packages on its own, I've grown rusty.
    – joran
    Mar 5, 2012 at 20:09
  • I tried it using melt from the reshape package and I got the following error: "Error in scale$labels(breaks) : unused argument(s) (breaks)" I wonder if it is because I am reading from a csv.
    – Julio Diaz
    Mar 5, 2012 at 20:12
  • @JulioDiaz Hmmm. Hard to say what's going on, particularly if the data you're working with don't look exactly like the example in your question. I would make sure all packages are up to date, and that you're on R 2.14.2 (I had to upgrade to 2.14.2 to get some stuff in ggplot 0.9.0 to work).
    – joran
    Mar 5, 2012 at 20:28
  • 7
    For those coming to this after 2018, replace "labels = percent_format()" with "scales::percent". Feb 23, 2018 at 15:38
20

Chris Beeley is rigth, you only need the proportions by column. Using your data is:

 your_matrix<-( 
               rbind(
                       c(23,234,324), 
                       c(34,534,12), 
                       c(56,324,124), 
                       c(34,234,124),
                       c(123,534,654)
                    )
                )

 barplot(prop.table(your_matrix, 2) )

Gives:

enter image description here

2
  • 1
    This should be the accepted answer. Really simple and simply works.
    – kboom
    Mar 25, 2020 at 8:11
  • 1
    @kboom it doesn't use ggplot2 whereby the OP tagged his question
    – Rafs
    Aug 14, 2020 at 12:17
14

prop.table is a nice friendly way of obtaining proportions of tables.

m <- matrix(1:4,2)

 m
     [,1] [,2]
[1,]    1    3
[2,]    2    4

Leaving margin blank gives you proportions of the whole table

 prop.table(m, margin=NULL)
     [,1] [,2]
[1,]  0.1  0.3
[2,]  0.2  0.4

Giving it 1 gives you row proportions

 prop.table(m, 1)
      [,1]      [,2]
[1,] 0.2500000 0.7500000
[2,] 0.3333333 0.6666667

And 2 is column proportions

 prop.table(m, 2)
          [,1]      [,2]
[1,] 0.3333333 0.4285714
[2,] 0.6666667 0.5714286
5

You just need to divide each element by the sum of the values in its column.

Doing this should suffice:

data.perc <- apply(data, 2, function(x){x/sum(x)})

Note that the second parameter tells apply to apply the provided function to columns (using 1 you would apply it to rows). The anonymous function, then, gets passed each data column, one at a time.

2
  • Hello, this didn't quiet adjusted my data, rowSums(data.perc) wasn't 1 for each line. Instead I used this: data.perc <- apply(data, 2, function(x){x/(apply(data,1,sum))})
    – 3nrique0
    Aug 9, 2018 at 11:54
  • did you have NAs or zero-summing lines? Otherwise I don't quite understand why that wouldn't work...
    – nico
    Aug 15, 2018 at 10:37
1

Another option is using the scalesextra package with scale_y_pct function which is able to create a percentage scale directly from your data. First, transform the data to a longer format using pivot_longer and create a percentage column per group. Here is a reproducible example:

library(ggplot2)
library(dplyr)
library(tidyr)
# remotes::install_github("thomas-neitmann/scalesextra")
library(scalesextra)
df %>%
  pivot_longer(cols=everything()) %>%
  group_by(name) %>%
  mutate(index = factor(row_number()),
         pct = value/sum(value)*100) %>% # Create percentage values
  ggplot(aes(x = factor(name, levels = unique(name)), y = pct, fill = index)) +
  geom_col() + 
  scale_y_pct() +
  labs(x = "Name")

Created on 2022-08-23 with reprex v2.0.2

For some extra info about this package and function check this tutorial.

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