6

Forgive me if this is trivial or not possible but I'm having a Monday morning moment here.

I'd like to create a method that implements some methods from the Gson library to loaded some settings Objects. Basically, I have a bunch of different settings objects but I don't want to habe to override the load method for each class to I'd like to have something like:

public class ConfigLoader {
    public static void main(final String[] args) {   
        final ConfigurationSettings loadedConfigSettigs =
            load("testSettings.json", ConfigurationSettings.class);

        final AlternativeConfigurationSettings alternativeConfigSettigs =
            load("testSettings2.json", AlternativeConfigurationSettings .class);
    }

    public T load(final InputStream inputStream, final Class<T> clazz) {
        try {
            if (inputStream != null) {
                final Gson gson = new Gson();
                final BufferedReader reader =
                    new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(inputStream));
                return gson.fromJson(reader, clazz);
            }
        } catch (final Exception e) {
        }
        return null;
    }
}

where I can pass in the InputStream and the class of the object I want to return. Is there a simple way to do this (I don't want to have to create a method for each Class I want to be able to load, nor do I want to have to create a specific loader for each class)?

  • 2
    What is the problem? The only thing that is not correct in your code is the typing of Object, because it is not "typable". You should return directly T instead. – Guillaume Polet Mar 5 '12 at 12:44
  • Thanks for pointing out that oversight. I have amended the code and given it some more context to show how I would like to use it. I would basically like to have one loader that loads an object given the class passed to it without having to create a loader for each class (as I would have to using the Class<T> method)? – Sonoman Mar 5 '12 at 12:57
  • OK but this works, right (besides the fact that you are passing a String instead of an InputStream, but we get your point)? (or else tell us what problem you are having). I don't see any issues in what you are trying to do and the way you seem to do it. So, what is blocking you? – Guillaume Polet Mar 5 '12 at 13:03
  • The only thing I wanted to get around was that I have to cast each Object I return from the load method (e.g. public class ConfigLoader<T> ...... final ConfigurationSettings loadedConfigSettigs = (ConfigurationSettings)load("testSettings.json", ConfigurationSettings.class); I was just wondering if there was a nicer/more concise way to this without casting given the fact I know what type of object I'm expecting when I call the load method. – Sonoman Mar 5 '12 at 13:14
  • Well the way it is now written you will not have to cast. You pass the Class<T> parameter and in return you will receive an object of type T, that is the whole point of typing. So yes, it will work the way you wrote it. – Guillaume Polet Mar 5 '12 at 13:23
10

The following code works (requires Java 1.5 or above):

import java.io.BufferedReader;
import java.io.File;
import java.io.FileInputStream;
import java.io.InputStream;
import java.io.InputStreamReader;
import com.google.gson.Gson;


public class ConfigLoader {
    public static void main(final String[] args) {
        final ConfigurationSettings loadedConfigSettigs = load(new FileInputStream(new File("testSettings.json")),
                ConfigurationSettings.class);

        final AlternativeConfigurationSettings alternativeConfigSettigs = load(new FileInputStream(new File("testSettings2.json")),
                AlternativeConfigurationSettings.class);
    }

    public static <T> T load(final InputStream inputStream, final Class<T> clazz) {
        try {
            if (inputStream != null) {
                final Gson gson = new Gson();
                final BufferedReader reader = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(inputStream));
                return gson.fromJson(reader, clazz);
            }
        } catch (final Exception e) {
        }
        return null;
    }
}
  • Thanks. That does indeed to the job. Could you perhaps explain the <T> T to me. I'm not quite sure what that's doing? – Sonoman Mar 5 '12 at 13:35
  • Well the first diamond indicates that uyou are going to use a type T, the second one is the actual return type of your method. You could also declare <T extends MyConfigSettings> and then this would force to use a class of type MyConfigSettings or one of its subclasses. You can also declare multiple types <T1, T2 extends List<T1>> for example. Look for doc on generics in Java for more details – Guillaume Polet Mar 5 '12 at 13:36
  • For best performance, don't create a Gson instance on each use. It's more efficient to reuse a Gson instance. – Jesse Wilson Mar 6 '12 at 2:32
  • Gson instances are even thread-safe, so you can share one across multiple threads safely! – MartinodF Jul 17 '13 at 16:31
  • Is it safety when you didn't close inputStream? – Thuy Trinh Nov 27 '13 at 15:38

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.