217

I don't know how to add new item to already existing hash. For example, first I construct hash:

hash = {item1: 1}

After that, I want to add item2, so after this I have hash like this:

{item1: 1, item2: 2}

I don't know what method to do on hash. Could someone help me?

0

7 Answers 7

352

Create the hash:

hash = {:item1 => 1}

Add a new item to it:

hash[:item2] = 2
2
  • 14
    Use merge! method hash.merge!(item2: 2) to merge and save the value !
    – maguri
    Commented Apr 10, 2018 at 15:15
  • 5
    @maguri hash.merge!(item2: 2) performs slower compared to hash[:item2] = 2 when there is only one argument
    – Rahul Dess
    Commented Oct 5, 2018 at 22:00
83

If you want to add new items from another hash - use merge method:

hash = {:item1 => 1}
another_hash = {:item2 => 2, :item3 => 3}
hash.merge(another_hash) # {:item1=>1, :item2=>2, :item3=>3}

In your specific case it could be:

hash = {:item1 => 1}
hash.merge({:item2 => 2}) # {:item1=>1, :item2=>2}

but it's not wise to use it when you should to add just one element more.

Pay attention that merge will replace the values with the existing keys:

hash = {:item1 => 1}
hash.merge({:item1 => 2}) # {:item1=>2}

exactly like hash[:item1] = 2

Also you should pay attention that merge method (of course) doesn't effect the original value of hash variable - it returns a new merged hash. If you want to replace the value of the hash variable then use merge! instead:

hash = {:item1 => 1}
hash.merge!({:item2 => 2})
# now hash == {:item1=>1, :item2=>2}
48

hash.store(key, value) - Stores a key-value pair in hash.

Example:

hash   #=> {"a"=>9, "b"=>200, "c"=>4}
hash.store("d", 42) #=> 42
hash   #=> {"a"=>9, "b"=>200, "c"=>4, "d"=>42}

Documentation

1
  • This is my preferred way too. It gets me every time is that it's hash.store("d", 42) not hash.store(d: 42) as I naturally think it is.
    – stevec
    Commented Feb 11, 2023 at 5:08
28

It's as simple as:

irb(main):001:0> hash = {:item1 => 1}
=> {:item1=>1}
irb(main):002:0> hash[:item2] = 2
=> 2
irb(main):003:0> hash
=> {:item1=>1, :item2=>2}
0
15

hash[key]=value Associates the value given by value with the key given by key.

hash[:newKey] = "newValue"

From Ruby documentation: http://www.tutorialspoint.com/ruby/ruby_hashes.htm

6
hash_items = {:item => 1}
puts hash_items 
#hash_items will give you {:item => 1}

hash_items.merge!({:item => 2})
puts hash_items 
#hash_items will give you {:item => 1, :item => 2}

hash_items.merge({:item => 2})
puts hash_items 
#hash_items will give you {:item => 1, :item => 2}, but the original variable will be the same old one. 
-3

Create hash as:

h = Hash.new
=> {}

Now insert into hash as:

h = Hash["one" => 1]
1
  • 4
    If you try inserting multiple keys this way, you'll see that you're actually creating a new hash each time. Probably not what you want. And if that is what you want, you don't need the Hash.new part regardless, because Hash[] is already creating a new hash.
    – philomory
    Commented Aug 12, 2016 at 1:03

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