68

How can I break a list comprehension based on a condition, for instance when the number 412 is found?

Code:

numbers = [951, 402, 984, 651, 360, 69, 408, 319, 601, 485, 980, 507, 725, 547, 544,
           615, 83, 165, 141, 501, 263, 617, 865, 575, 219, 390, 984, 592, 236, 105, 942, 941,
           386, 462, 47, 418, 907, 344, 236, 375, 823, 566, 597, 978, 328, 615, 953, 345, 399,
           162, 758, 219, 918, 237, 412, 566, 826, 248, 866, 950, 626, 949, 687, 217, 815, 67,
           104, 58, 512, 24, 892, 894, 767, 553, 81, 379, 843, 831, 445, 742, 717, 958, 609, 842,
           451, 688, 753, 854, 685, 93, 857, 440, 380, 126, 721, 328, 753, 470, 743, 527]

even = [n for n in numbers if 0 == n % 2]

So functionally, it would be something you can infer this is supposed to do:

even = [n for n in numbers if 0 == n % 2 and break if n == 412]

I really prefer:

  • a one-liner
  • no other fancy libraries like itertools, "pure python" if possible (read: the solution should not use any import statement or similar)
13
  • 22
    itertools is pure python.
    – Marcin
    Mar 5 '12 at 19:41
  • 7
    ... itertools is Python ... Overall this sounds like a job for a normal for loop. Mar 5 '12 at 19:42
  • 7
    @Flavius: Why is importing something from Python's own library not "showing off its powers"? Mar 5 '12 at 19:58
  • 11
    @Flavius: So you are trying to convince your colleagues that you can write something hackish and ugly in Python and that will somehow impress them? Mar 5 '12 at 20:18
  • 6
    @Flavius, much of the power of Python lies in its standard libraries. Would Python be "more powerful" if more of the standard library functions were built-ins instead? I think not. They're standard either way, but there would be more potential for namespace collisions if they were built-ins. Better to segregate them.
    – senderle
    Mar 19 '12 at 16:00
67

Use a function to raise StopIteration and list to catch it:

>>> def end_of_loop():
...     raise StopIteration
... 
>>> even = list(end_of_loop() if n == 412 else n for n in numbers if 0 == n % 2)
>>> print(even)
[402, 984, 360, 408, 980, 544, 390, 984, 592, 236, 942, 386, 462, 418, 344, 236, 566, 978, 328, 162, 758, 918]

For those complaining it is not a one-liner:

even = list(next(iter(())) if n == 412 else n for n in numbers if 0 == n % 2)

For those complaining it is hackish and should not be used in production code: Well, you're right. Definitely.

5
  • This is not list comprehension, from my understanding, BUT it's an one-liner (I'll consider it as such, since the function is only used because of an unexplicable limitation in python for those raise statements there), and it doesn't seem to have any drawbacks. +1ed
    – Flavius
    Mar 5 '12 at 19:49
  • +0. Clever. But hackish and not a one-liner. Mar 5 '12 at 19:50
  • Is there a fix that is kosher in Python 3+?
    – Zuza
    Nov 7 '18 at 21:13
  • 3
    @Zuza A very similar example is included in the PEP's "Examples of breakage" section. You can find it at the end. A single line workaround will no longer be possible - you'll need to define a generator function.
    – Sherpa
    Feb 6 '19 at 22:47
  • 3
    RuntimeError: generator raised StopIteration
    – wim
    Oct 29 '20 at 5:33
54

You can use generator expressions together with itertools.takewhile():

even_numbers = (n for n in numbers if not n % 2)
list(itertools.takewhile(lambda x: x != 412, even_numbers))

Edit: I just noticed the requirement not to use any imports. Well, I leave this answer here anyway.

1
  • 13
    And if he really wants his one liner: [n for n in itertools.takewhile(lambda x: x != 412, numbers) if not n % 2] Mar 5 '12 at 19:54
19
even = [n for n in numbers[:None if 412 not in numbers else numbers.index(412)] if not n % 2] 

Just took F.J.'s code above and added a ternary to check if 412 is in the list. Still a 'one liner' and will work even if 412 is not in the list.

6
  • 1
    If 412 is not in numbers the last element is lost if it's even. Jun 5 '15 at 23:22
  • 14
    Who is F.J. and where is the "code above"? Do not mistake Stack Overflow for a (conventional) forum; per the tour, answers may rise to the top or fall to the bottom.
    – Jongware
    Mar 9 '18 at 11:35
  • 6
    @usr2564301. I will keep that in mind. When I answered this question 6 years ago there must have been another answer that was rated above this that I improved on. Mar 9 '18 at 21:08
  • Do you still remember which answer you amended to? :)
    – Jongware
    Mar 9 '18 at 21:19
  • 3
    Thank you to all who contributed to sharing advice on this post. However, this is the kind of practice that just frustrates less-skilled people trying to make sense of this 12 months later. Can we avoid "one-liners" which result in "one-hour" trying to decode them? Feb 11 '20 at 10:11
19

I know this is a VERY OLD post, however since OP asked about using break inside a list-comprehension and I was also looking for something similar, I thought I would post my findings here for future reference.

While investigating break, I came across little known feature of iter as iter(callable, sentinel) which return an iterator that "breaks" iteration once callable function value is equal to sentinel value.

>>> help(iter)
Help on built-in function iter in module __builtin__:

iter(...)
    iter(collection) -> iterator
    iter(callable, sentinel) -> iterator

    Get an iterator from an object.  In the first form, the argument must
    supply its own iterator, or be a sequence.
    In the second form, the callable is called until it returns the sentinel.

Tricky part here is defining a function that would fit given problem. In this case first we need to convert given list of numbers to an iterator using x = iter(numbers) which feeds as external variable into lambda function.

Next, our callable function is just a call to the iterator to spit out next value. The iterator then compares with our sentinel value (412 in this case) and "breaks" once that value is reached.

print [i for i in iter(lambda x=iter(numbers): next(x),412) if i %2 == 0]

>>> 
[402, 984, 360, 408, 980, 544, 390, 984, 592, 236, 942, 386, 462, 418,  
 344, 236, 566, 978, 328, 162, 758, 918]
2
  • Can you have it stop after hitting value, rather than before?
    – Elliptica
    Jun 22 '18 at 0:38
  • I do not believe so. This arrangement by definition "breaks" iteration once callable function value is equal to sentinel value. You may want to look at @ WolframH solution and modify function to suite your needs.
    – Anil_M
    Jun 25 '18 at 15:39
14

If 412 will definitely be in the list you could use this:

even = [n for n in numbers[:numbers.index(412)] if not n % 2]

If you want to include 412 in the result just use numbers[:numbers.index(412)+1] for the slice.

Note that because of the slice this will be less efficient (at least memory-wise) than an itertools or for loop solution.

4
  • Not only because of the slice it is less efficient, it also has to make a linear search over the list. Mar 5 '12 at 19:47
  • 2
    @FelixKling - Nevertheless, in a quick timeit test with the other answers shows that this is faster for the sample data provided. I would definitely expect the others to pass it as the data set increases though. Mar 5 '12 at 19:58
  • 4
    @FelixKling: The linear search for 412 is super-fast C code, while the other solutions test for 412 in Python code, some solutions calling a function (which is expensive in CPython) for every number. I'm sure this solution is faster! -- The list copy is also done in very fast C code; unless you are tight on memory there shouldn't be a performance problem. (OK, if the first number is 412 and the list has 10**6 entries, it's bad; but if 412 is the last number this solution should still be very, very fast.) Mar 5 '12 at 20:30
  • Considering the previous comment, +1ed.
    – Flavius
    Mar 5 '12 at 21:29
4

The syntax for list displays (including list comprehensions) is here: http://docs.python.org/reference/expressions.html#list-displays

As you can see, there is no special while or until syntax. The closest you can get is:

even_numbers = (n for n in numbers if 0 == n % 2)
list(itertools.takewhile(lambda x: x != 412, even_numbers))

(Code taken from Sven Marnach's answer, posted while I was typing this).

1
  • 5
    I didn't downvote, but I assume it's because you took the code from someone else. At least you admitted it. I'll upvote it.
    – CoffeeRain
    Mar 5 '12 at 19:59
0

another sneaky one-line solution to solve breaking in list comprehension, with the help of end condition.

without using numbers.index(412), maybe a little bit faster?

even = [n for end in [[]] for n in numbers
        if (False if end or n != 412 else end.append(42))
        or not end and not n % 2]

Note: This is a bad idea. just for fun : )

as @WolframH said:

For those complaining it is hackish and should not be used in production code: Well, you're right. Definitely.

0

Considering the generator solution is outdated I came up with the following:

even = [n for n in next((numbers[:i] for i, n in enumerate(numbers) if n == 412)) if not n % 2]

Then I went back and saw Andrew Clark's answer which is the same but much better

even = [n for n in numbers[:numbers.index(412)] if not n % 2]

Regardless the best part about the slicing solution is you can choose to include or exclude a number of elements on either side of the ending element for example to get 412 and the number after:

even = [n for n in numbers[:numbers.index(412)+2] if not n % 2]

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