26

I need some help with an app. I need to make a random number generator for integers between zero and fifteen, which will then, depending on which number is created, push to a view with the corresponding number. This is how I want it to work

Push a button --> random number generator gives a number between 0 and 15 --> view pushes to another view that has been assigned the number that the random number generator gave.

Can anybody help me with the code? Thanks

97

arc4random() is the standard Objective-C random number generator function. It'll give you a number between zero and... well, more than fifteen! You can generate a number between 0 and 15 (so, 0, 1, 2, ... 15) with the following code:

NSInteger randomNumber = arc4random() % 16;

Then you can do a switch or a series of if/else statements to push a different view controller:

UIViewController *viewController = nil;
switch (randomNumber)
{
    case 0:
        viewController = [[MyViewController alloc] initWithNibName:@"MyViewController" bundle:nil];
    break;
    // etc ...
}

[self.navigationController pushViewController:viewController animated:YES];

Or rather, upon rereading the question, it would look like the following:

UIViewController *viewController = [[MyViewController alloc] initWithNibName:@"MyViewController" 
viewController.number = randomNumber;

And you'd have an NSInteger property on the MyViewController subclass.

  • 8
    The function arc4random_uniform() is preferred since it doesn't suffer from modulo bias. – Victor Engel May 6 '13 at 18:26
  • Does this function generate psuedo random number? what seed does it use? – Charles Chow Jun 8 '14 at 0:25
  • @CharlesChow quoting the man page, "The arc4random() function uses the key stream generator employed by the arc4 cipher, which uses 8*8 8 bit S-Boxes. The S-Boxes can be in about (2**1700) states. The arc4random() function returns pseudo-random numbers in the range of 0 to (2**32)-1, and therefore has twice the range of rand(3) and random(3)." – jk7 Jan 5 '17 at 18:50
  • Thank you @jk7 ! – Charles Chow Jan 6 '17 at 1:05
19

You can use arc4random_uniform

NSUInteger r = arc4random_uniform(16);
  • In 64 bit mode, arc4random_uniform returns a 32-bit int and NSUInteger is a 64-bit int, right? – avance Apr 11 '14 at 19:41
  • u_int32_t arc4random_uniform(u_int32_t /*upper_bound*/) __OSX_AVAILABLE_STARTING(__MAC_10_7, __IPHONE_4_3); It looks like it's always an unsigned int on 32 bits. – Rémy Virin Apr 12 '14 at 6:52
10

According to Apple, the best way is to use arc4random_uniform and pass the upper bound:

arc4random_uniform(16)

From the docs:

arc4random_uniform() will return a uniformly distributed random number less than upper_bound. arc4random_uniform() is recommended over constructions like ``arc4random() % upper_bound'' as it avoids "modulo bias" when the upper bound is not a power of two.

https://developer.apple.com/library/mac/documentation/Darwin/Reference/ManPages/man3/arc4random.3.html

9
    int randomIndex = arc4random() % 14 + 1 ; // gives no .between 1 to 15 ..

    switch (randomIndex)
{
    case 0 :
    push view 1 ;
    break;

    case 1:
    ...

}
  • 4
    or arc4random() % 16 to match the correct range, also arc4random() % 14 + 1 gives [1,14]. – user971401 Mar 5 '12 at 20:28
  • why the -1? other then the % 14 + 1; I don't see anything wrong with this. – John Riselvato Mar 5 '12 at 21:16
0

We can use the C function rand() for this:

This generates an integer between 1 and 30. Alternatively you can use the arc4random function like this:

int i = arc4random() % 30;
NSLog(@"Random Number: %i", i);
0

In Swift 4.2, we don't have to call some "arc4random_uniform" function for creating random numbers, now we can just call a function "random(in:RANGE)".

//Create Random numbers Swift 4.2

//Int
let randomInt = Int.random(in: 1...10)

//Double
let radomDouble = Double.random(in: 1...10)

//Float
let randomFloat = Double.random(in: 1...10)
0
extension CGFloat {
   static func random() -> CGFloat {
       return CGFloat(arc4random()) / CGFloat(UInt32.max)
   }
}

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