How do you reverse a string in place (or in-place) in JavaScript when passed to a function with a return statement? All without using the built-in functions? .reverse(), .charAt(), etc.

41 Answers 41

As long as you're dealing with simple ASCII characters, and you're happy to use built-in functions, this will work:

function reverse(s){
    return s.split("").reverse().join("");
}

If you need a solution that supports UTF-16 or other multi-byte characters, be aware that this function will give invalid unicode strings, or valid strings that look funny. You might want to consider this answer instead.

  • 38
    This is broken for UTF-16 strings that contain surrogate pairs, i.e. characters outside of the basic multilingual plane. It will also give funny results for strings containing combining chars, e.g. a diaeresis might appear on the following character. The first issue will lead to invalid unicode strings, the second to valid strings that look funny. – Martin Probst Apr 10 '13 at 13:21
  • 1
    @Richeve Bebedor "All without using the built-in functions? .reverse()" This would not be an accepted solution since it does not fit within the confines of the question, despite being a viable solution to reversing a string in JS. – David Starkey Apr 30 '13 at 18:06
  • 1
    @DavidStarkey: Yes, looking back on this almost four years later, it's hard to see how I so thoroughly missed the point of the question. It looks like I should've just waited two minutes and upvoted crescentfresh's comment on the original post! – belacqua May 2 '13 at 2:04
  • 14
    @MartinProbst My answer provides a Unicode-aware solution to the problem that deals with surrogate pairs and combining marks correctly: stackoverflow.com/a/16776380/96656 – Mathias Bynens May 27 '13 at 15:45
  • perfect for a hex string – Patartics Milán Mar 2 '16 at 19:45

The following technique (or similar) is commonly used to reverse a string in JavaScript:

// Don’t use this!
var naiveReverse = function(string) {
    return string.split('').reverse().join('');
}

In fact, all the answers posted so far are a variation of this pattern. However, there are some problems with this solution. For example:

naiveReverse('foo 𝌆 bar');
// → 'rab �� oof'
// Where did the `𝌆` symbol go? Whoops!

If you’re wondering why this happens, read up on JavaScript’s internal character encoding. (TL;DR: 𝌆 is an astral symbol, and JavaScript exposes it as two separate code units.)

But there’s more:

// To see which symbols are being used here, check:
// http://mothereff.in/js-escapes#1ma%C3%B1ana%20man%CC%83ana
naiveReverse('mañana mañana');
// → 'anãnam anañam'
// Wait, so now the tilde is applied to the `a` instead of the `n`? WAT.

A good string to test string reverse implementations is the following:

'foo 𝌆 bar mañana mañana'

Why? Because it contains an astral symbol (𝌆) (which are represented by surrogate pairs in JavaScript) and a combining mark (the in the last mañana actually consists of two symbols: U+006E LATIN SMALL LETTER N and U+0303 COMBINING TILDE).

The order in which surrogate pairs appear cannot be reversed, else the astral symbol won’t show up anymore in the ‘reversed’ string. That’s why you saw those �� marks in the output for the previous example.

Combining marks always get applied to the previous symbol, so you have to treat both the main symbol (U+006E LATIN SMALL LETTER N) as the combining mark (U+0303 COMBINING TILDE) as a whole. Reversing their order will cause the combining mark to be paired with another symbol in the string. That’s why the example output had instead of ñ.

Hopefully, this explains why all the answers posted so far are wrong.


To answer your initial question — how to [properly] reverse a string in JavaScript —, I’ve written a small JavaScript library that is capable of Unicode-aware string reversal. It doesn’t have any of the issues I just mentioned. The library is called Esrever; its code is on GitHub, and it works in pretty much any JavaScript environment. It comes with a shell utility/binary, so you can easily reverse strings from your terminal if you want.

var input = 'foo 𝌆 bar mañana mañana';
esrever.reverse(input);
// → 'anañam anañam rab 𝌆 oof'

As for the “in-place” part, see the other answers.

  • 40
    You should include the main part of the code of Esrever in your answer. – r0estir0bbe Jul 31 '14 at 11:25
  • If a wrong approach used ( i.e. split().reverse().join() ) - will the length of the string always be the same after reversing? – Meglio Jan 24 '15 at 1:22
  • 1
    @Meglio With that specific approach, yes. – Mathias Bynens Jan 26 '15 at 8:21
  • 7
    The problem, off-course, is that "reverse a string" sounds unambiguous, but it isn't in the face of the problems mentioned here. Is reversing a string returning the string that when printed would display the grapheme clusters in the string in reverse order? On the one hand, that sounds likely. On the other, why would you ever want to do that? This definition hinges on it being printed, and printing a reversed string is rarely useful. As part of an algorithm, your requirements might be different altogether. – Martijn Apr 14 '15 at 10:55
  • 14
    While this does a great job of explaining the problem, the actual answer is in another castle. As @r0estir0bbe said over a year ago, the relevant code should be in the answer, not just linked. – T.J. Crowder Sep 17 '15 at 8:53
String.prototype.reverse=function(){return this.split("").reverse().join("");}

or

String.prototype.reverse = function() {
    var s = "";
    var i = this.length;
    while (i>0) {
        s += this.substring(i-1,i);
        i--;
    }
    return s;
}
  • 3
    string concatenation is expensive. Better to build an array and join it or use concat(). – Bjorn Tipling Jun 6 '09 at 5:52
  • 2
    +1: Oh, uh... Is Bob short for Kate? – John Gietzen Jun 6 '09 at 23:50
  • 2
    #1 is best, #2 could be horribly slow – adamJLev Jul 15 '10 at 16:42
  • 9
    However, neither solution work when Unicode compound characters are present. – Eric Grange Aug 2 '11 at 9:37
  • 2
    @JuanMendes I left that comment in 2009, things have changed in the last 4 years. :P – Bjorn Tipling Feb 26 '13 at 14:48

The whole "reverse a string in place" is an antiquated interview question C programmers, and people who were interviewed by them (for revenge, maybe?), will ask. Unfortunately, it's the "In Place" part that no longer works because strings in pretty much any managed language (JS, C#, etc) uses immutable strings, thus defeating the whole idea of moving a string without allocating any new memory.

While the solutions above do indeed reverse a string, they do not do it without allocating more memory, and thus do not satisfy the conditions. You need to have direct access to the string as allocated, and be able to manipulate its original memory location to be able to reverse it in place.

Personally, i really hate these kinds of interview questions, but sadly, i'm sure we'll keep seeing them for years to come.

  • 6
    I can at least say that I had one interviewer a while back be pretty impressed when he asked me how to reverse a string "in-place" in JS and I explained why its impossible since strings in JS are immutable. I don't know if that was the answer he expected or if I educated him a little. Either way it worked out alright ;) – Chev Jan 28 '14 at 17:43
  • 2
    In what sense is JS a "managed language"? – user663031 Jun 13 '15 at 11:03
  • Maybe he means "managed" by a garbage collector, at least that is what is usually meant by "managed language" or the presence of a Virtual Machine / Virtual Runtime Environment? @torazaburo – AntonB Jul 15 '16 at 15:12

Detailed analysis and ten different ways to reverse a string and their performance details.

http://eddmann.com/posts/ten-ways-to-reverse-a-string-in-javascript/

Perfomance of these implementations:

Best performing implementation(s) per browser

  • Chrome 15 - Implemations 1 and 6
  • Firefox 7 - Implementation 6
  • IE 9 - Implementation 4
  • Opera 12 - Implementation 9

Here are those implementations:

Implementation 1:

function reverse(s) {
  var o = '';
  for (var i = s.length - 1; i >= 0; i--)
    o += s[i];
  return o;
}

Implementation 2:

function reverse(s) {
  var o = [];
  for (var i = s.length - 1, j = 0; i >= 0; i--, j++)
    o[j] = s[i];
  return o.join('');
}

Implementation 3:

function reverse(s) {
  var o = [];
  for (var i = 0, len = s.length; i <= len; i++)
    o.push(s.charAt(len - i));
  return o.join('');
}

Implementation 4:

function reverse(s) {
  return s.split('').reverse().join('');
}

Implementation 5:

function reverse(s) {
  var i = s.length,
      o = '';
  while (i > 0) {
    o += s.substring(i - 1, i);
    i--;
  }
  return o;
}

Implementation 6:

function reverse(s) {
  for (var i = s.length - 1, o = ''; i >= 0; o += s[i--]) { }
  return o;
}

Implementation 7:

function reverse(s) {
  return (s === '') ? '' : reverse(s.substr(1)) + s.charAt(0);
}

Implementation 8:

function reverse(s) {
  function rev(s, len, o) {
    return (len === 0) ? o : rev(s, --len, (o += s[len]));
  };
  return rev(s, s.length, '');
}

Implementation 9:

function reverse(s) {
  s = s.split('');
  var len = s.length,
      halfIndex = Math.floor(len / 2) - 1,
      tmp;


     for (var i = 0; i <= halfIndex; i++) {
        tmp = s[len - i - 1];
        s[len - i - 1] = s[i];
        s[i] = tmp;
      }
      return s.join('');
    }

Implementation 10

function reverse(s) {
  if (s.length < 2)
    return s;
  var halfIndex = Math.ceil(s.length / 2);
  return reverse(s.substr(halfIndex)) +
         reverse(s.substr(0, halfIndex));
}

First, use Array.from() to turn a string into an array, then Array.prototype.reverse() to reverse the array, and then Array.prototype.join() to make it back a string.

const reverse = str => Array.from(str).reverse().join('');
  • It's got overhead, but this is an elegant solution! There's no rewrite of the pre-existing reverse logic. – Gershom Maes Aug 20 '16 at 19:44
  • string.split('') will also work instead of Array.from() – felixfbecker Oct 13 '16 at 9:06
  • 1
    @felixfbecker No, string.split('') doesn't work. See this answer for more explanation. – Michał Perłakowski Oct 13 '16 at 11:40
  • 4
    This should be the accepted answer because it also works with unicode. Eg, from the example above: Array.from('foo 𝌆 bar mañana mañana').reverse().join('') == 'anãnam anañam rab 𝌆 oof' – Julian TF Jan 31 '17 at 6:18
  • @JulianTF Not exactly, one tilde is still applied to 'a' instead of 'n'. – Roman Boiko Dec 3 '17 at 14:18

In ECMAScript 6, you can reverse a string even faster without using .split('') split method, with the spread operator like so:

var str = [...'racecar'].reverse().join('');
  • 1
    ES6 also allows you to use two backticks `` instead of ('') – user4227915 Feb 27 '16 at 3:12
  • there's no reason to use two backticks in this case – Vic Feb 18 at 22:33
  • 1
    Unless you are code golfing you should avoid this. Writing string.split('') is clearer to most people than [...string]. – Annan Mar 27 at 1:06

Seems like I'm 3 years late to the party...

Unfortunately you can't as has been pointed out. See Are JavaScript strings immutable? Do I need a "string builder" in JavaScript?

The next best thing you can do is to create a "view" or "wrapper", which takes a string and reimplements whatever parts of the string API you are using, but pretending the string is reversed. For example:

var identity = function(x){return x};

function LazyString(s) {
    this.original = s;

    this.length = s.length;
    this.start = 0; this.stop = this.length; this.dir = 1; // "virtual" slicing
    // (dir=-1 if reversed)

    this._caseTransform = identity;
}

// syntactic sugar to create new object:
function S(s) {
    return new LazyString(s);
}

//We now implement a `"...".reversed` which toggles a flag which will change our math:

(function(){ // begin anonymous scope
    var x = LazyString.prototype;

    // Addition to the String API
    x.reversed = function() {
        var s = new LazyString(this.original);

        s.start = this.stop - this.dir;
        s.stop = this.start - this.dir;
        s.dir = -1*this.dir;
        s.length = this.length;

        s._caseTransform = this._caseTransform;
        return s;
    }

//We also override string coercion for some extra versatility (not really necessary):

    // OVERRIDE STRING COERCION
    //   - for string concatenation e.g. "abc"+reversed("abc")
    x.toString = function() {
        if (typeof this._realized == 'undefined') {  // cached, to avoid recalculation
            this._realized = this.dir==1 ?
                this.original.slice(this.start,this.stop) : 
                this.original.slice(this.stop+1,this.start+1).split("").reverse().join("");

            this._realized = this._caseTransform.call(this._realized, this._realized);
        }
        return this._realized;
    }

//Now we reimplement the String API by doing some math:

    // String API:

    // Do some math to figure out which character we really want

    x.charAt = function(i) {
        return this.slice(i, i+1).toString();
    }
    x.charCodeAt = function(i) {
        return this.slice(i, i+1).toString().charCodeAt(0);
    }

// Slicing functions:

    x.slice = function(start,stop) {
        // lazy chaining version of https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/JavaScript/Reference/Global_Objects/Array/slice

        if (stop===undefined)
            stop = this.length;

        var relativeStart = start<0 ? this.length+start : start;
        var relativeStop = stop<0 ? this.length+stop : stop;

        if (relativeStart >= this.length)
            relativeStart = this.length;
        if (relativeStart < 0)
            relativeStart = 0;

        if (relativeStop > this.length)
            relativeStop = this.length;
        if (relativeStop < 0)
            relativeStop = 0;

        if (relativeStop < relativeStart)
            relativeStop = relativeStart;

        var s = new LazyString(this.original);
        s.length = relativeStop - relativeStart;
        s.start = this.start + this.dir*relativeStart;
        s.stop = s.start + this.dir*s.length;
        s.dir = this.dir;

        //console.log([this.start,this.stop,this.dir,this.length], [s.start,s.stop,s.dir,s.length])

        s._caseTransform = this._caseTransform;
        return s;
    }
    x.substring = function() {
        // ...
    }
    x.substr = function() {
        // ...
    }

//Miscellaneous functions:

    // Iterative search

    x.indexOf = function(value) {
        for(var i=0; i<this.length; i++)
            if (value==this.charAt(i))
                return i;
        return -1;
    }
    x.lastIndexOf = function() {
        for(var i=this.length-1; i>=0; i--)
            if (value==this.charAt(i))
                return i;
        return -1;
    }

    // The following functions are too complicated to reimplement easily.
    // Instead just realize the slice and do it the usual non-in-place way.

    x.match = function() {
        var s = this.toString();
        return s.apply(s, arguments);
    }
    x.replace = function() {
        var s = this.toString();
        return s.apply(s, arguments);
    }
    x.search = function() {
        var s = this.toString();
        return s.apply(s, arguments);
    }
    x.split = function() {
        var s = this.toString();
        return s.apply(s, arguments);
    }

// Case transforms:

    x.toLowerCase = function() {
        var s = new LazyString(this.original);
        s._caseTransform = ''.toLowerCase;

        s.start=this.start; s.stop=this.stop; s.dir=this.dir; s.length=this.length;

        return s;
    }
    x.toUpperCase = function() {
        var s = new LazyString(this.original);
        s._caseTransform = ''.toUpperCase;

        s.start=this.start; s.stop=this.stop; s.dir=this.dir; s.length=this.length;

        return s;
    }

})() // end anonymous scope

Demo:

> r = S('abcABC')
LazyString
  original: "abcABC"
  __proto__: LazyString

> r.charAt(1);       // doesn't reverse string!!! (good if very long)
"B"

> r.toLowerCase()    // must reverse string, so does so
"cbacba"

> r.toUpperCase()    // string already reversed: no extra work
"CBACBA"

> r + '-demo-' + r   // natural coercion, string already reversed: no extra work
"CBAcba-demo-CBAcba"

The kicker -- the following is done in-place by pure math, visiting each character only once, and only if necessary:

> 'demo: ' + S('0123456789abcdef').slice(3).reversed().slice(1,-1).toUpperCase()
"demo: EDCBA987654"

> S('0123456789ABCDEF').slice(3).reversed().slice(1,-1).toLowerCase().charAt(3)
"b"

This yields significant savings if applied to a very large string, if you are only taking a relatively small slice thereof.

Whether this is worth it (over reversing-as-a-copy like in most programming languages) highly depends on your use case and how efficiently you reimplement the string API. For example if all you want is to do string index manipulation, or take small slices or substrs, this will save you space and time. If you're planning on printing large reversed slices or substrings however, the savings may be small indeed, even worse than having done a full copy. Your "reversed" string will also not have the type string, though you might be able to fake this with prototyping.

The above demo implementation creates a new object of type ReversedString. It is prototyped, and therefore fairly efficient, with almost minimal work and minimal space overhead (prototype definitions are shared). It is a lazy implementation involving deferred slicing. Whenever you perform a function like .slice or .reversed, it will perform index mathematics. Finally when you extract data (by implicitly calling .toString() or .charCodeAt(...) or something), it will apply those in a "smart" manner, touching the least data possible.

Note: the above string API is an example, and may not be implemented perfectly. You also can use just 1-2 functions which you need.

  • 7
    +1 For a "don't reverse it - just pretend you did" answer. – Michael Anderson Jun 19 '12 at 13:36
  • +1 This is a nifty solution :) – Ja͢ck Aug 29 '12 at 7:09

During an interview, I was asked to reverse a string without using any variables or native methods. This is my favorite implementation:

function reverseString(str) {
    return str === '' ? '' : reverseString(str.slice(1)) + str[0];
}
  • Short, simple, but slow as hell ;) – Tom Mar 24 '15 at 15:36
  • 11
    Zero native methods? What about slice? :-/ – leaf Jun 14 '15 at 11:10
  • 1
    Interesting use of recursion. Ironic that it's on Stack Overflow. stackoverflow.com/q/2805172/265877 – Alex Sep 2 '15 at 17:17

This is the easiest way I think

var reverse = function(str) {
    var arr = [];
    
    for (var i = 0, len = str.length; i <= len; i++) {
        arr.push(str.charAt(len - i))
    }

    return arr.join('');
}

console.log(reverse('I want a 🍺'));

  • 2
    It's nice that you've included an emoji in your example. So that we quickly see that this clearly doesn't work for emojis and a lot of other unicode chars. – Íhor Mé Jul 21 '17 at 20:48
var str = 'sample string';
[].map.call(str, function(x) {
  return x;
}).reverse().join('');

OR

var str = 'sample string';
console.log(str.split('').reverse().join(''));

// Output: 'gnirts elpmas'

  • Your entire 'map` part can be written as [...str]. – user663031 May 1 '17 at 5:25

I know that this is an old question that has been well answered, but for my own amusement I wrote the following reverse function and thought I would share it in case it was useful for anyone else. It handles both surrogate pairs and combining marks:

function StringReverse (str)
{
  var charArray = [];
  for (var i = 0; i < str.length; i++)
    {
      if (i+1 < str.length)
        {
          var value = str.charCodeAt(i);
          var nextValue = str.charCodeAt(i+1);
          if (   (   value >= 0xD800 && value <= 0xDBFF
                  && (nextValue & 0xFC00) == 0xDC00) // Surrogate pair)
              || (nextValue >= 0x0300 && nextValue <= 0x036F)) // Combining marks
            {
              charArray.unshift(str.substring(i, i+2));
              i++; // Skip the other half
              continue;
            }
        }

      // Otherwise we just have a rogue surrogate marker or a plain old character.
      charArray.unshift(str[i]);
    }

  return charArray.join('');
}

All props to Mathias, Punycode, and various other references for schooling me on the complexities of character encoding in JavaScript.

In ES6, you have one more option

function reverseString (str) {
  return [...str].reverse().join('')
}

reverseString('Hello');

The real answer is: you can't reverse it in place, but you can create a new string that is the reverse.

Just as an exercise to play with recursion: sometimes when you go to an interview, the interviewer may ask you how to do this using recursion, and I think the "preferred answer" might be "I would rather not do this in recursion as it can easily cause a stack overflow" (because it is O(n) rather than O(log n). If it is O(log n), it is quite difficult to get a stack overflow -- 4 billion items could be handled by a stack level of 32, as 2 ** 32 is 4294967296. But if it is O(n), then it can easily get a stack overflow.

Sometimes the interviewer will still ask you, "just as an exercise, why don't you still write it using recursion?" And here it is:

String.prototype.reverse = function() {
    if (this.length <= 1) return this;
    else return this.slice(1).reverse() + this.slice(0,1);
}

test run:

var s = "";
for(var i = 0; i < 1000; i++) {
    s += ("apple" + i);
}
console.log(s.reverse());

output:

999elppa899elppa...2elppa1elppa0elppa

To try getting a stack overflow, I changed 1000 to 10000 in Google Chrome, and it reported:

RangeError: Maximum call stack size exceeded

Strings themselves are immutable, but you can easily create a reversed copy with the following code:

function reverseString(str) {

  var strArray = str.split("");
  strArray.reverse();

  var strReverse = strArray.join("");

  return strReverse;
}

reverseString("hello");
//es6
//array.from
const reverseString = (string) => Array.from(string).reduce((a, e) => e + a);
//split
const reverseString = (string) => string.split('').reduce((a, e) => e + a); 

//split problem
"𠜎𠺢".split('')[0] === Array.from("𠜎𠺢")[0] // "�" === "𠜎" => false
"😂😹🤗".split('')[0] === Array.from("😂😹🤗")[0] // "�" === "😂" => false
  • 1
    This has the advantage that it handles supplementary plane characters correctly. – user663031 May 1 '17 at 5:16
function reverseString(string) {
    var reversedString = "";
    var stringLength = string.length - 1;
    for (var i = stringLength; i >= 0; i--) {
        reversedString += string[i];
    }
    return reversedString;
}

without converting string to array;

String.prototype.reverse = function() {

    var ret = "";
    var size = 0;

    for (var i = this.length - 1; -1 < i; i -= size) {

        if (
          '\uD800' <= this[i - 1] && this[i - 1] <= '\uDBFF' && 
          '\uDC00' <= this[i]     && this[i]     <= '\uDFFF'
        ) {
            size = 2;
            ret += this[i - 1] + this[i];
        } else {
            size = 1;
            ret += this[i];
        }
    }

    return ret;
}

console.log('anãnam anañam' === 'mañana mañana'.reverse());

using Array.reverse without converting characters to code points;

String.prototype.reverse = function() {

    var array = this.split("").reverse();

    for (var i = 0; i < this.length; ++i) {

        if (
          '\uD800' <= this[i - 1] && this[i - 1] <= '\uDBFF' && 
          '\uDC00' <= this[i]     && this[i]     <= '\uDFFF'
        ) {
            array[i - 1] = array[i - 1] + array[i];
            array[i] = array[i - 1].substr(0, 1);
            array[i - 1] = array[i - 1].substr(1, 1);
        }

    }

    return array.join("");
}

console.log('anãnam anañam' === 'mañana mañana'.reverse());
  • For the second version: var c = array[i-1]; array[i-1] = array[i]; array[i] = c; does not require concatenating the code pair. Also, the for-loop should start at 1. – MT0 Jan 9 '17 at 13:11
  • The second version does not work with '\ud83c\ud83c\udfa5'.reverse() - it will output the same as the input. Adding ++i; within the if statement should fix this. – MT0 Jan 9 '17 at 13:22
  • On second thoughts - this does not handle combining diacritics: 'a\u0303bc'.reverse() === 'cba\u0303' should return true. – MT0 Jan 9 '17 at 14:33

I think String.prototype.reverse is a good way to solve this problem; the code as below;

String.prototype.reverse = function() {
  return this.split('').reverse().join('');
}

var str = 'this is a good example for string reverse';
str.reverse();
-> "esrever gnirts rof elpmaxe doog a si siht";
  • 2
    Isn't there already an exact same answer here? – super May 12 '14 at 17:30

Using Array functions,

String.prototype.reverse = function(){
    return [].reduceRight.call(this, function(last, secLast){return last + secLast});
}
var str = "my name is saurabh ";
var empStr='',finalString='';
var chunk=[];
function reverse(str){
var i,j=0,n=str.length;
    for(i=0;i<n;++i){
        if(str[i]===' '){
            chunk[j]=empStr;
            empStr = '';
            j++;
        }else{
            empStr=empStr+str[i];
        }
    }
    for(var z=chunk.length-1;z>=0;z--){
        finalString = finalString +' '+ chunk[z];
        console.log(finalString);
    }
    return true;
}
reverse(str);

My own original attempt...

var str = "The Car";

function reverseStr(str) {
  var reversed = "";
  var len = str.length;
  for (var i = 1; i < (len + 1); i++) {  
    reversed += str[len - i];      
  }

  return reversed;
}

var strReverse = reverseStr(str);    
console.log(strReverse);
// "raC ehT"

http://jsbin.com/bujiwo/19/edit?js,console,output

Keep it DRY and simple silly!!

function reverse(s){
let str = s;
var reverse = '';
for (var i=str.length;i>0;i--){

    var newstr = str.substring(0,i)
    reverse += newstr.substr(-1,1)
}
return reverse;
}

OK, pretty simple, you can create a function with a simple loop to do the string reverse for you without using reverse(), charAt() etc like this:

For example you have this string:

var name = "StackOverflow";

Create a function like this, I call it reverseString...

function reverseString(str) {
  if(!str.trim() || 'string' !== typeof str) {
    return;
  }
  let l=str.length, s='';
  while(l > 0) {
    l--;
    s+= str[l];
  }
  return s;
}

And you can call it like:

reverseString(name);

And the result will be:

"wolfrevOkcatS"

If you don't want to use any built in function. Try this

        var string = 'abcdefg';
        var newstring = '';

        for(let i = 0; i < string.length; i++){
            newstring = string[i] += newstring
        }

        console.log(newstring)

Another variation (does it work with IE?):

String.prototype.reverse = function() {
    for (i=1,s=""; i<=this.length; s+=this.substr(-i++,1)) {}
    return s;
}

EDIT:

This is without the use of built-in functions:

String.prototype.reverse = function() {
    for (i=this[-1],s=""; i>=0; s+=this[i--]) {}
    return s;
}

Note: this[-1] holds a length of the string.

However it's not possible to reverse the string in place, since the assignment to individual array elements doesn't work with String object (protected?). I.e. you can do assigns, but the resulting string doesn't change.

var str = "IAMA JavaScript Developer";
var a=str.split(''), b = a.length;
for (var i=0; i<b; i++) {
    a.unshift(a.splice(1+i,1).shift())
}
a.shift();
alert(a.join(''));
  • This is so bad on performance. – user633183 Jun 26 '13 at 21:25
function reverse_string(string)
{
var string;

var len = string.length;

var stringExp = string.split('');
var i;
for (i = len-1; i >=0;i--)
{
var result = document.write(stringExp[i]);
}

return result;
}

reverse_string("This is a reversed string");

//outputs: gnirts desrever a si sihT

function reverse(str){
var s = "";
for (var i = str.length - 1; i >= 0; i--){
    s += str[i];
}
return s;
};
reverse("your string comes here")

The below might help anyone that is looking to reverse a string recursively. Was asked to do this in a recent job interview using functional programming style:

var reverseStr = function(str) {
    return (str.length > 0) ? str[str.length - 1] + reverseStr(str.substr(0, str.length -   1)) : '';
};

//tests
console.log(reverseStr('setab retsam')); //master bates

protected by Tunaki Feb 4 '16 at 8:28

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