123

I have two DateTime objects: StartDate and EndDate. I want to make sure StartDate is before EndDate. How is this done in C#?

0

10 Answers 10

235
if (StartDate < EndDate)
   // code

if you just want the dates, and not the time

if (StartDate.Date < EndDate.Date)
    // code
1
  • Note: This doesn't account for UTC vs Local time, it compares both as if they're in the same timezone.
    – IronSean
    Jan 13 at 15:50
29
if(StartDate < EndDate)
{}

DateTime supports normal comparision operators.

24

You can use the overloaded < or > operators.

For example:

DateTime d1 = new DateTime(2008, 1, 1);
DateTime d2 = new DateTime(2008, 1, 2);
if (d1 < d2) { ...
0
8
if (StartDate>=EndDate)
{
    throw new InvalidOperationException("Ack!  StartDate is not before EndDate!");
}
7
StartDate < EndDate
6

This is probably too late, but to benefit other people who might stumble upon this, I used an extension method do to this using IComparable like this:

public static class BetweenExtension
    {
        public static bool IsBetween<T>(this T value, T min, T max) where T : IComparable
        {
            return (min.CompareTo(value) <= 0) && (value.CompareTo(max) <= 0);
        }
    }

Using this extension method with IComparable makes this method more generic and makes it usable with a wide variety of data types and not just dates.

You would use it like this:

DateTime start = new DateTime(2015,1,1);
DateTime end = new DateTime(2015,12,31);
DateTime now = new DateTime(2015,8,20);

if(now.IsBetween(start, end))
{
     //Your code here
}
5

Check out DateTime.Compare method

3

I had the same requirement, but when using the accepted answer, it did not fulfill all of my unit tests. The issue for me is when you have a new object, with Start and End dates and you have to set the Start date ( at this stage your End date has the minimum date value of 01/01/0001) - this solution did pass all my unit tests:

    public DateTime Start
    {
        get { return _start; }
        set
        {
            if (_end.Equals(DateTime.MinValue))
            {
                _start = value;
            }
            else if (value.Date < _end.Date)
            {
                _start = value;
            }
            else
            {
                throw new ArgumentException("Start date must be before the End date.");
            }
        }
    }


    public DateTime End
    {
        get { return _end; }
        set
        {
            if (_start.Equals(DateTime.MinValue))
            {
                _end = value;
            }
            else if (value.Date > _start.Date)
            {
                _end = value;
            }
            else
            {
                throw new ArgumentException("End date must be after the Start date.");
            }
        }
    }

It does miss the edge case where both Start and End dates can be 01/01/0001 but I'm not concerned about that.

2
        if (new DateTime(5000) > new DateTime(1000))
        {
            Console.WriteLine("i win");
        }
0

I'd like to demonstrate that if you convert to .Date that you don't need to worry about hours/mins/seconds etc:

    [Test]
    public void ConvertToDateWillHaveTwoDatesEqual()
    {
        DateTime d1 = new DateTime(2008, 1, 1);
        DateTime d2 = new DateTime(2008, 1, 2);
        Assert.IsTrue(d1 < d2);

        DateTime d3 = new DateTime(2008, 1, 1,7,0,0);
        DateTime d4 = new DateTime(2008, 1, 1,10,0,0);
        Assert.IsTrue(d3 < d4);
        Assert.IsFalse(d3.Date < d4.Date);
    }

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.