36

I would like to display some html code if a variable is not empty, else I would like to display nothing.

I've tried this code but doesn't work:

<?php 
    $web = the_field('website');
    if (isset($web)) {
?>
       <span class="field-label">Website: </span><a href="http://<?php the_field('website'); ?>" target="_blank"><?php the_field('website'); ?></a> 
<?php
    } else { 
        echo "Niente";
    }
?>
  • 1
    What is the_field? – user554546 Mar 6 '12 at 22:23
  • 1
    @Jack Maney - I believe that's an auto WordPress function that outputs the given field name. – Morgon Mar 6 '12 at 22:25

10 Answers 10

77
if (!empty($web)) {
?>
    <span class="field-label">Website:  </span><a href="http://<?php the_field('website'); ?>" target="_blank"><?php the_field('website'); ?></a> 
<?php
} else { echo "Niente";}

http://us.php.net/manual/en/function.empty.php

  • 3
    There should be an ! before your empty call, as that is what the OP is looking for. – pbond Mar 6 '12 at 22:29
16

isset will return true even if the variable is "". isset returns false only if a variable is null. What you should be doing:

if (!empty($web)) {
    // foo
}

This will check that he variable is not empty.

Hope this helps

  • The OP should be using a plain, simple if ($web). No need for empty here, it just has the potential to hide mistakes unnecessarily. – deceze Mar 7 '12 at 2:41
  • I don't see how if(!empty($var)) can create confusion, but I do agree that if ($var) is simpler. – vanneto Mar 8 '12 at 13:33
  • 3
    Because empty has the specific purpose of suppressing errors for nonexistent variables. You don't want to suppress errors unless you need to. The Definitive Guide To PHP's isset And empty explains the problem in detail. – deceze Mar 9 '12 at 1:24
10

Simply use if ($web). This is true if the variable has any truthy value.

You don't need isset or empty since you know the variable exists, since you have just set it in the previous line.

  • 3
    This is the best answer. It seems few people know this. – IXN Oct 21 '17 at 23:14
2

I don't see how if(!empty($var)) can create confusion, but I do agree that if ($var) is simpler. – vanneto Mar 8 '12 at 13:33

Because empty has the specific purpose of suppressing errors for nonexistent variables. You don't want to suppress errors unless you need to. The Definitive Guide To PHP's isset And empty explains the problem in detail. – deceze♦ Mar 9 '12 at 1:24

Focusing on the error suppression part, if the variable is an array where a key being accessed may or may not be defined:

  1. if($web['status']) would produce:

    Notice: Undefined index: status

  2. To access that key without triggering errors:
    1. if(isset($web['status']) && $web['status']) (2nd condition is not tested if the 1st one is FALSE) OR
    2. if(!empty($web['status'])).

However, as deceze♦ pointed out, a truthy value of a defined variable makes !empty redundant, but you still need to remember that PHP assumes the following examples as FALSE:

  • null
  • '' or ""
  • 0.0
  • 0
  • '0' or "0"
  • '0' + 0 + !3

So if zero is a meaningful status that you want to detect, you should actually use string and numeric comparisons:

  1. Error free and zero detection:

    if(isset($web['status'])){
      if($web['status'] === '0' || $web['status'] === 0 ||
         $web['status'] === 0.0 || $web['status']) {
        // not empty: use the value
      } else {
        // consider it as empty, since status may be FALSE, null or an empty string
      }
    }
    

    The generic condition ($web['status']) should be left at the end of the entire statement.

  • An 3v4l example with a converted object into an array depicting property_exists, isset, array_key_exists and empty shows that isset always detects if the variable has been assigned a non-null value and array_key_exists always detects if the key is accessible. – CPHPython Jul 19 '18 at 14:25
  • isset && !empty is redundant. Just !empty will do exactly the same. – deceze Jun 13 at 8:31
  • 1
    @deceze It has been a while but you're right: empty does seem to absorb/suppress all notices/errors, avoiding the "Undefined offset/index" notice to be thrown due to a non-existing key in the array (even in PHP v4.4.9, just tested :). I adjusted the answer, thanks for pointing that out! – CPHPython Jun 14 at 12:44
0
if(!empty($web))
{
   echo 'Something';
}
  • This worked good: <?php $web = get_field('website'); if (!empty($web)) { echo "<span class='field-label'>Website: </span><a href='http://<?php the_field('website'); ?> target='_blank'><?php the_field('website'); ?></a>"; } else { echo "Niente";} ?> But i can't see the true link, I see this output: WEBSITE: target='_blank'> – Luca Frank Guarini Mar 6 '12 at 22:33
0

You're using isset, what isset does is check if the variable is set ('exists') and is not NULL. What you're looking for is empty, which checks if a variable is empty or not, even if it's set. To check what is empty and what is not take a look at:

http://php.net/manual/en/function.empty.php

Also check http://php.net/manual/en/function.isset.php for what isset does exactly, so you understand why it doesn't do what you expect it to do.

0
if($var !== '' && $var !== NULL)
{
   echo $var;
}
0

Your problem is in your use of the_field(), which is for Advanced Custom Fields, a wordpress plugin.

If you want to use a field in a variable you have to use this: $web = get_field('website');.

0

i hope this will work too, try using"is_null"

<?php 
$web = the_field('website');
if (!is_null($web)) {
?>

....html code here

<?php
} else { 
    echo "Niente";
}
?>

http://php.net/manual/en/function.is-null.php

hope that suits you..

-5

Seems like folks are complicating this a bit. Back to the original question, " ... if variable is not empty, echo some html code." "I would like to display some html code if a variable is not empty, else I would like to display nothing."

Easy way:

<?php if (!empty($var)) echo "Some Html Code Here"; ?>

If your variable is not empty "Some HTML code here" will be displayed. If it is empty nothing will happen.

  • 2
    How this add any value to the existing 4 years old answers? – vard Feb 4 '16 at 10:05
  • This is enough to make me contribute nothing here. To directly address your comment, because others like myself might still come across this thread while searching for information, regardless of age. My post speaks for itself insofar as why I made it. Because it is a greatly simplified correct answer to the original question, and future searcher's, inquiries. A better question might be, "How did it hurt?" – M Steigman Feb 13 '16 at 21:16
  • 3
    I don't see any difference with the answers posted by hohner, Rodney or vanneto. Answering an already answered old question is totally ok, but you should be sure that you add value to the existing answers. Having 5 answers saying the same thing with only trivial, non relevant differences will not help future reader in any way and just increase noise. You're more than welcome to contribute here but I suggest to read the how to answer help page: "[...] avoid trying to answer questions which have already been asked and answered many times before." – vard Feb 15 '16 at 7:59

protected by Quentin Jun 17 '16 at 15:39

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