44

I would like to display some html code if a variable is not empty, else I would like to display nothing.

I've tried this code but doesn't work:

<?php 
    $web = the_field('website');
    if (isset($web)) {
?>
       <span class="field-label">Website: </span><a href="http://<?php the_field('website'); ?>" target="_blank"><?php the_field('website'); ?></a> 
<?php
    } else { 
        echo "Niente";
    }
?>
1
  • 1
    @Jack Maney - I believe that's an auto WordPress function that outputs the given field name. – Morgon Mar 6 '12 at 22:25
90
if (!empty($web)) {
?>
    <span class="field-label">Website:  </span><a href="http://<?php the_field('website'); ?>" target="_blank"><?php the_field('website'); ?></a> 
<?php
} else { echo "Niente";}

http://us.php.net/manual/en/function.empty.php

1
  • 3
    There should be an ! before your empty call, as that is what the OP is looking for. – pbond Mar 6 '12 at 22:29
19

isset will return true even if the variable is "". isset returns false only if a variable is null. What you should be doing:

if (!empty($web)) {
    // foo
}

This will check that he variable is not empty.

Hope this helps

3
  • 1
    The OP should be using a plain, simple if ($web). No need for empty here, it just has the potential to hide mistakes unnecessarily. – deceze Mar 7 '12 at 2:41
  • I don't see how if(!empty($var)) can create confusion, but I do agree that if ($var) is simpler. – mishmash Mar 8 '12 at 13:33
  • 3
    Because empty has the specific purpose of suppressing errors for nonexistent variables. You don't want to suppress errors unless you need to. The Definitive Guide To PHP's isset And empty explains the problem in detail. – deceze Mar 9 '12 at 1:24
12

Simply use if ($web). This is true if the variable has any truthy value.

You don't need isset or empty since you know the variable exists, since you have just set it in the previous line.

1
  • 3
    This is the best answer. It seems few people know this. – IXN Oct 21 '17 at 23:14
2

I don't see how if(!empty($var)) can create confusion, but I do agree that if ($var) is simpler. – vanneto Mar 8 '12 at 13:33

Because empty has the specific purpose of suppressing errors for nonexistent variables. You don't want to suppress errors unless you need to. The Definitive Guide To PHP's isset And empty explains the problem in detail. – deceze♦ Mar 9 '12 at 1:24

Focusing on the error suppression part, if the variable is an array where a key being accessed may or may not be defined:

  1. if($web['status']) would produce:

    Notice: Undefined index: status

  2. To access that key without triggering errors:
    1. if(isset($web['status']) && $web['status']) (2nd condition is not tested if the 1st one is FALSE) OR
    2. if(!empty($web['status'])).

However, as deceze♦ pointed out, a truthy value of a defined variable makes !empty redundant, but you still need to remember that PHP assumes the following examples as FALSE:

  • null
  • '' or ""
  • 0.0
  • 0
  • '0' or "0"
  • '0' + 0 + !3

So if zero is a meaningful status that you want to detect, you should actually use string and numeric comparisons:

  1. Error free and zero detection:

    if(isset($web['status'])){
      if($web['status'] === '0' || $web['status'] === 0 ||
         $web['status'] === 0.0 || $web['status']) {
        // not empty: use the value
      } else {
        // consider it as empty, since status may be FALSE, null or an empty string
      }
    }
    

    The generic condition ($web['status']) should be left at the end of the entire statement.

3
  • An 3v4l example with a converted object into an array depicting property_exists, isset, array_key_exists and empty shows that isset always detects if the variable has been assigned a non-null value and array_key_exists always detects if the key is accessible. – CPHPython Jul 19 '18 at 14:25
  • isset && !empty is redundant. Just !empty will do exactly the same. – deceze Jun 13 '19 at 8:31
  • 1
    @deceze It has been a while but you're right: empty does seem to absorb/suppress all notices/errors, avoiding the "Undefined offset/index" notice to be thrown due to a non-existing key in the array (even in PHP v4.4.9, just tested :). I adjusted the answer, thanks for pointing that out! – CPHPython Jun 14 '19 at 12:44
1

You're using isset, what isset does is check if the variable is set ('exists') and is not NULL. What you're looking for is empty, which checks if a variable is empty or not, even if it's set. To check what is empty and what is not take a look at:

http://php.net/manual/en/function.empty.php

Also check http://php.net/manual/en/function.isset.php for what isset does exactly, so you understand why it doesn't do what you expect it to do.

1
  • This is the best way if you have to check a variable that contains numbers. As in the refernce shown, $e = 0; echo empty($e) will return false too. It does not matter in what format we provide the number. (String, Float, int) See: php.net/manual/en/… – Svenwas3f Jun 8 '20 at 5:37
0
if(!empty($web))
{
   echo 'Something';
}
1
  • This worked good: <?php $web = get_field('website'); if (!empty($web)) { echo "<span class='field-label'>Website: </span><a href='http://<?php the_field('website'); ?> target='_blank'><?php the_field('website'); ?></a>"; } else { echo "Niente";} ?> But i can't see the true link, I see this output: WEBSITE: target='_blank'> – Luca Frank Guarini Mar 6 '12 at 22:33
0
if($var !== '' && $var !== NULL)
{
   echo $var;
}
4
  • This is less elegant than deceze's answer -- which is the most professional technique on the page. – mickmackusa Mar 10 at 11:27
  • deceze's technique does not work when variable have false value and question is about check if variable is not empty. – dev verma Mar 12 at 9:41
  • Then I guess it comes down to what you consider empty. Deceze is very careful to explain that his check is "truthy". If the OP specifically expects a boolean false value, that is not clear in the question. Your unexplained answer does not speak of allowing boolean false values. – mickmackusa Mar 12 at 9:44
  • I don't Wordpress. Does the_field() return false AND would the OP want to handle it as a non-empty outcome if it does? I reckon not. – mickmackusa Mar 12 at 10:02
0

Your problem is in your use of the_field(), which is for Advanced Custom Fields, a wordpress plugin.

If you want to use a field in a variable you have to use this: $web = get_field('website');.

0

i hope this will work too, try using"is_null"

<?php 
$web = the_field('website');
if (!is_null($web)) {
?>

....html code here

<?php
} else { 
    echo "Niente";
}
?>

http://php.net/manual/en/function.is-null.php

hope that suits you..

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