25

Python date calculations, where art thou?

I have a python app that needs to plot out dates every three months for several years. It's important that the dates occur exactly 4 times a year, and that the dates occur on the same day each year as much as possible, and that the dates occur on the same day of the month as much as possible, and that the dates be as close to "3 months" apart as they can be (which is a moving target, especially on leap year). Unfortunately, datetime.timedelta doesn't support months!

Is there a "standard" way to do this calculation in python???

The SQL way?

If worst comes to worst, I will punt and have my app ask PostgreSQL, who does have nice built-in support for date calculations, for the answer like this:

# select ('2010-11-29'::date + interval '3 months')::date;
    date    
------------
 2011-02-28
(1 row)
  • Depends on what you consider a month. Is it always 90 days? – campos.ddc Mar 7 '12 at 1:14
  • Why not just fix the dates? For instance, use Jan 1, April 1, July 1, Oct 1. That satisfies the "exactly 4 times a year" and you don't have to pick the 1st, it could be the 5th or the 10th, or whatever day you choose. The only downside is Q1 gets 90 or 91 days, Q2 gets 91, Q3 and Q4 both get 92, but that's good enough for government work. – jgritty Mar 7 '12 at 1:18
  • FYI, I ended up using PostgresSQL for all my date calculations, because it was by far the nicest, sanest calculations in the cleanest way. I marked the best python answer below, though. – Nathan Dec 2 '14 at 20:31
56

If you're looking for exact or "more precise" dates, you're probably better off checking out dateutil.

Quick example:

>>> from dateutil.relativedelta import relativedelta
>>> import datetime
>>> TODAY = datetime.date.today()
>>> TODAY
datetime.date(2012, 3, 6)

Now add 3 months to TODAY, observe that it matches the day exactly (Note that relativedelta(months=3) and relativedelta(month=3) have different behaviors. Make sure to use months for these examples!).

>>> three_mon_rel = relativedelta(months=3)
>>> TODAY + three_mon_rel
datetime.date(2012, 6, 6)

And it stays consistent throughout the course of a year. Literally every three months, on the day (had to keep adding because for some reason multiplying a relativedelta and adding it to a datetime.date object throws a TypeError):

>>> TODAY + three_mon_rel + three_mon_rel
datetime.date(2012, 9, 6)
>>> TODAY + three_mon_rel + three_mon_rel + three_mon_rel
datetime.date(2012, 12, 6)
>>> TODAY + three_mon_rel + three_mon_rel + three_mon_rel + three_mon_rel
datetime.date(2013, 3, 6)

Whereas the mVChr's suggested solution, while definitely "good enough", drifts slightly over time:

>>> three_mon_timedelta = datetime.timedelta(days=3 * 365/12)
>>> TODAY + three_mon_timedelta
datetime.date(2012, 6, 5)

And over the course of a year, the day of month keeps sliding:

>>> TODAY + three_mon_timedelta * 2
datetime.date(2012, 9, 4)
>>> TODAY + three_mon_timedelta * 3
datetime.date(2012, 12, 4)
>>> TODAY + three_mon_timedelta * 4
datetime.date(2013, 3, 5)
  • 6
    relativedelta(months=3) and relativedelta(month=3) have really different behaviors, I've struggle a little to see that I've missed an 's' on 'month', maybe that's good to be mentioned in your very good answer :) – dulaccc Oct 25 '13 at 10:38
  • Good call! I updated the response to reflect your comment, and fixed a typo while I was at it. :) – jathanism Oct 25 '13 at 19:35
  • big +1 to dateutil module – xliiv Dec 1 '15 at 13:15
  • This is a little drifty with months with less days. Instead of TODAY + delta + delta ..., you should do delta + delta + TODAY. This ensures that even if there's a February in the way, you'll land on the best day possible in the month you end in. – Adam Barnes Oct 19 '17 at 13:38
7
import datetime

some_date = datetime.date.today()
three_months = datetime.timedelta(3*365/12)
print (some_date + three_months).isoformat()
# => '2012-06-01'

Then "normalize" every new year to the original date's day (unless Feb 29)

  • This is a "good enough" solution. I like the use of 3 * 365 / 12 vs. 3 * 30. – jathanism Mar 7 '12 at 1:19
  • I get 2012-06-05 is your date set wrong? Because today is the 6th of March. – jgritty Mar 7 '12 at 1:23
  • 3
    Also, three_months here is just 91 days exactly, unless you do 3*365.0/12. Then it's 91 days and 6 hours. – jgritty Mar 7 '12 at 1:27
  • Oops, yes, tested on my VM. Thanks. – mVChr Mar 7 '12 at 1:27
1

here is a good solution http://www.voidspace.org.uk/python/weblog/arch_d7_2012_02_25.shtml#e1235

edit ah standard way sorry...

1

Using Python standard libraries, i.e. without dateutil or others, and solving the 'February 31st' problem:

import datetime
import calendar

def add_months(date, months):
    months_count = date.month + months

    # Calculate the year
    year = date.year + int(months_count / 12)

    # Calculate the month
    month = (months_count % 12)
    if month == 0:
        month = 12

    # Calculate the day
    day = date.day
    last_day_of_month = calendar.monthrange(year, month)[1]
    if day > last_day_of_month:
        day = last_day_of_month

    new_date = datetime.date(year, month, day)
    return new_date

Testing:

>>>date = datetime.date(2018, 11, 30)

>>>print(date, add_months(date, 3))
(datetime.date(2018, 11, 30), datetime.date(2019, 2, 28))

>>>print(date, add_months(date, 14))
(datetime.date(2018, 12, 31), datetime.date(2020, 2, 29))
0

I don't have enough reputation to comment. So, I am just going to write up a solution that fixes a bug in the solution that David Ragazzi posted.

The error occurs when you add enough months to get to a December date. The year is 1 too many.

For example, add_months(date.fromisoformat('2020-01-29'), 11) returns 2021 instead of 2020. I fixed the issue by changing the line starting with year =.

    import datetime
    import calendar
    def add_months(dateInput, months):
        months_count = dateInput.month + months

        # Calculate the year
        year = dateInput.year + int((months_count-1) / 12)

        # Calculate the month
        month = (months_count % 12)
        if month == 0:
            month = 12

        # Calculate the day
        day = dateInput.day
        last_day_of_month = calendar.monthrange(year, month)[1]
        if day > last_day_of_month:
            day = last_day_of_month

        new_date = date(year, month, day)
        return new_date

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