30

The groupBy method in Lists, Maps, etc., generate a Map after the function.

Is there a way to use the groupBy to generate a Map that preserves insertion order (LinkedHashMap, for instance)?

I'm using for loops to insert manually, but I wanted to know if one of the useful already-defined functions could help me.

Thanks in advance.

23

groupBy as defined on TraversableLike produces an immutable.Map, so you can't make this method produce something else.

The order of the elements in each entry is already preserved, but not the order of the keys. The keys are the result of the function supplied, so they don't really have an order.

If you wanted to make an order based on the first occurrence of a particular key, here's a sketch of how you might do it. Say we want to group integers by their value / 2:

val m = List(4, 0, 5, 1, 2, 6, 3).zipWithIndex groupBy (_._1 / 2)
val lhm = LinkedHashMap(m.toSeq sortBy (_._2.head._2): _*)
lhm mapValues (_ map (_._1))
// Map(2 -> List(4, 5), 0 -> List(0, 1), 1 -> List(2, 3), 3 -> List(6))
// Note order of keys is same as first occurrence in original list
5
  • 4
    "The order of the elements in each entry is already preserved", is this guaranteed? It doesn't seem to say much about it in the API doc. – Mortimer Feb 15 '13 at 18:17
  • 2
    @Mortimer If the API docs don't say so then I suppose in theory it isn't guaranteed (although, the docs in general are quite poor). The order of elements is only meaningful for Seqs, while this method is generic over all Traversables, but since the implementation uses a for-expression to iterate through the elements, it will always be true for Seqs. – Luigi Plinge Feb 15 '13 at 23:17
  • right, that's what I thought. I'll have to make sure they keep ordered then. Thanks. – Mortimer Feb 16 '13 at 2:31
  • 1
    @Mortimer I mean, include a unit test for it if you want, but it's not something you need to check at runtime – Luigi Plinge Feb 16 '13 at 17:18
  • 2
    Most examples involving tuples are the worst to read and understand, including this one. I did up-vote because it works :) – Sudheer Aedama Oct 6 '15 at 23:29
19

The following would give you a groupByOrderedUnique method that behaves as you sought. It also adds a groupByOrdered that preserves duplicates as others have asked for in the comments.

import collection.immutable.ListSet
import collection.mutable.{LinkedHashMap => MMap, Builder}

implicit class GroupByOrderedImplicitImpl[A](val t: Traversable[A]) extends AnyVal {
  def groupByOrderedUnique[K](f: A => K): Map[K, ListSet[A]] =
    groupByGen(ListSet.newBuilder[A])(f)

  def groupByOrdered[K](f: A => K): Map[K, List[A]] =
    groupByGen(List.newBuilder[A])(f)

  def groupByGen[K, C[_]](makeBuilder: => Builder[A, C[A]])(f: A => K): Map[K, C[A]] = {
    val map = MMap[K, Builder[A, C[A]]]()
    for (i <- t) {
      val key = f(i)
      val builder = map.get(key) match {
        case Some(existing) => existing
        case None =>
          val newBuilder = makeBuilder
          map(key) = newBuilder
          newBuilder
      }
      builder += i
    }
    map.mapValues(_.result).toMap
  }
}

When I use that code like:

import GroupByOrderedImplicit._
  
val range = 0.until(40)
val in = range ++ range.reverse
  
println("With dupes:")
in.groupByOrdered(_ % 10).toList.sortBy(_._1).foreach(println)
  
println("\nUnique:")
in.groupByOrderedUnique(_ % 10).toList.sortBy(_._1).foreach(println)

I get the following output:

With dupes:
(0,List(0, 10, 20, 30, 30, 20, 10, 0))
(1,List(1, 11, 21, 31, 31, 21, 11, 1))
(2,List(2, 12, 22, 32, 32, 22, 12, 2))
(3,List(3, 13, 23, 33, 33, 23, 13, 3))
(4,List(4, 14, 24, 34, 34, 24, 14, 4))
(5,List(5, 15, 25, 35, 35, 25, 15, 5))
(6,List(6, 16, 26, 36, 36, 26, 16, 6))
(7,List(7, 17, 27, 37, 37, 27, 17, 7))
(8,List(8, 18, 28, 38, 38, 28, 18, 8))
(9,List(9, 19, 29, 39, 39, 29, 19, 9))

Unique:
(0,ListSet(0, 10, 20, 30))
(1,ListSet(1, 11, 21, 31))
(2,ListSet(2, 12, 22, 32))
(3,ListSet(3, 13, 23, 33))
(4,ListSet(4, 14, 24, 34))
(5,ListSet(5, 15, 25, 35))
(6,ListSet(6, 16, 26, 36))
(7,ListSet(7, 17, 27, 37))
(8,ListSet(8, 18, 28, 38))
(9,ListSet(9, 19, 29, 39))
6
  • Not a drop in replacement for groupBy though... it may be necessary to call toList on the value, which is LinkedHashSet – User Jul 12 '15 at 19:32
  • There is problem with your implementation that your key is Set, and thus it removes duplicate values... – KadekM Jun 23 '16 at 16:59
  • Why did you extend AnyVal? – St.Antario Jul 12 '17 at 7:20
  • 1
    @St.Antario, I extended AnyVal so that the methods of the implicit wrapper class would be called without allocation. This page does a nice job of describing the rationale in the neighborhood of "type enrichments." ivanyu.me/blog/2014/12/14/value-classes-in-scala – Leif Wickland Jul 12 '17 at 13:57
  • A variation on this would be to use a ListBuffer in place of the LinkedHashSet - appeding using map(key) = map(key) :+ i. This allows duplicated values in the results, as per the standard behaviour of groupBy – Rocketeer Sep 4 '20 at 9:49
5

Here's one without maps:

def orderedGroupBy[T, P](seq: Traversable[T])(f: T => P): Seq[(P, Traversable[T])] = {
   @tailrec
   def accumulator(seq: Traversable[T], f: T => P, res: List[(P, Traversable[T])]): Seq[(P, Traversable[T])] = seq.headOption match {
     case None => res.reverse
     case Some(h) => {
       val key = f(h)
       val subseq = seq.takeWhile(f(_) == key)
       accumulator(seq.drop(subseq.size), f, (key -> subseq) :: res)
     }
   }
   accumulator(seq, f, Nil)
 }

It could be useful if you only need to access the results sequentially (no random access) and you want to avoid the overhead of creating and using Map objects. Note: I didn't compare the performance against the other options, it could actually be worse.

EDIT: Just to be clear; this assumes your input is already ordered by the group key. My use case is a SELECT ... ORDER BY.

2
  • 1
    This will not handle out of order elements in you sequence. Ie (A,A,A,B,B,B,C,C,C) will be grouped as expected but not (A,B,C,A,B,C,A,B,C). – Magnus May 11 '16 at 17:34
  • good point Magnus; that's the point of this function (and, I hope, of the question). but it bears being explicit about. – hraban May 14 '16 at 6:50
-1

This yields better results on ScalaMeter though the solution is very similar to the actual scala groupBy

    ::Benchmark Range.GroupBy::
    cores: 8
    hostname: xxxxx-MacBook-Pro.local
    name: Java HotSpot(TM) 64-Bit Server VM
    osArch: x86_64
    osName: Mac OS X
    vendor: Oracle Corporation
    version: 25.131-b11
    Parameters(size -> 300000): 6.500884
    Parameters(size -> 600000): 13.019679
    Parameters(size -> 900000): 22.756615
    Parameters(size -> 1200000): 25.481007
    Parameters(size -> 1500000): 33.129888

compared to the one that zipWithIndex approach which yields

    :Benchmark Range.GroupBy::
    cores: 8
    hostname: xxxxx-MacBook-Pro.local
    name: Java HotSpot(TM) 64-Bit Server VM
    osArch: x86_64
    osName: Mac OS X
    vendor: Oracle Corporation
    version: 25.131-b11
    Parameters(size -> 300000): 9.57414
    Parameters(size -> 600000): 18.569085
    Parameters(size -> 900000): 28.233822
    Parameters(size -> 1200000): 36.975254
    Parameters(size -> 1500000): 47.447057

Code:

implicit class GroupBy[A](val t: TraversableOnce[A]) {
  def sortedGroupBy[K](f: A => K)(implicit ordering: Ordering[K]): immutable.SortedMap[K, ArrayBuffer[A]] = {
    val m = mutable.SortedMap.empty[K, ArrayBuffer[A]]
    for (elem <- t) {
      val key = f(elem)
      val bldr = m.getOrElseUpdate(key, mutable.ArrayBuffer[A]())
      bldr += elem
    }
    val b = immutable.SortedMap.newBuilder[K, ArrayBuffer[A]]
    for ((k, v) <- m) {
      b += ((k, v.result))
    }
    b.result
  }
}

example: val sizes = Gen.range("size")(300000, 1500000, 300000) and groupByOrdered(_ % 10)

2
  • Code-only answers aren't usually very helpful. With a question this old, and with 3 well received answers already, you should describe how your answer differs from those already submitted. – jwvh Aug 20 '17 at 7:10
  • i see what you mean ! – rnalli Aug 23 '17 at 11:14

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