3

I wrote a program so the user inputs a number and the program outputs its binary representation.

I get this error:

No matching function for call to `getline(std::istream&, unsigned int&)'

How can I solve this?

Also, it outputs:

0
0
0
0

...when it should output the right value for the input.

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

int main()
{
    int Number;
    cin >> Number;
    bool Binary[sizeof(int) * CHAR_BIT];
    for (unsigned int i = 0; i < sizeof(int) * CHAR_BIT; i++)
        Binary[(sizeof(int) * CHAR_BIT - 1) - i] = Number & (1 << i);

    for (unsigned int i = 0; i < sizeof(int); i++)
        std::cout << Binary[i] << std::endl;

    system("pause");
    return 0;
}
4
  • 2
    using namespace std; and then why use std::cout and std::endl – Rohit Vipin Mathews Mar 7 '12 at 8:25
  • you should indent your code for readbility... – Jörg Beyer Mar 7 '12 at 8:25
  • 1
    and why getline? cant you use std::cin>>number – Rohit Vipin Mathews Mar 7 '12 at 8:25
  • How did you get incorrect output when it doesn't compile? – Johnsyweb Mar 7 '12 at 8:47
11

The getline() function takes an istream and a string, not an integer. So:

string sNumber;
getline(cin, sNumber);
// now convert sNumber to an unsigned int
2

std::getline() gets a line into a std::string variable. You'll need to convert it to an unsigned int yourself. The usual way is to use a std::istringstream instance like so:

#include <sstream>
#include <iostream>
#include <iomanip>

int main ()
{
    std::string line;
    std::getline(std::cin, line);
    std::istringstream iss(line);

    unsigned int number = 0U;

    if (!(iss >> number))
    {
        // Handle error
    }
    else
    {   // Put your binary conversion logic in a function!
        std::cout << to_binary(number) << std::endl;
    }
}

Tip: Indentation can greatly improve the readability and maintainability of your code.

Putting your binary conversion logic into a function will make it easier to test (think "unit-test") and to reuse, like this:

// I've left this logic untouched other than to indent it and to introduce
// braces. It needs to be fixed. Declare before main().

std::string to_binary(unsigned int Number)
{
    std::ostringstream oss;

    bool Binary[sizeof(int) * CHAR_BIT];
    for (unsigned int i = 0; i < sizeof(int) * CHAR_BIT; i++)
    {
        Binary[(sizeof(int) * CHAR_BIT - 1) - i] = Number & (1 << i);
    }

    for(unsigned int i = 0; i < sizeof(int); i++)
    {
        oss << Binary[i] << std::endl;
    }

    return oss.str();
}

I've left correcting your binary conversion logic as an exercise as this looks like homework.

1
  • @Joriek: It (your compiler) would give you an error if you had not extracted the function to_binary(). I'be updated my answer to clarify what that may look like. – Johnsyweb Mar 7 '12 at 17:28
1

getline can only be used to read in a complete line as a string. If you want to read in a number, use operator>>.

Example:

int number;
std::cin >> number;
1
unsigned int Number;
std::cin >> number;

and why you cant use getline(). Read this!!

0

The following are the valid signatures of getline:

istream& getline(char*, int, char = '\n');
istream& getline(signed char*, int, char = '\n');
istream& getline(unsigned char*, int, char = '\n');

You are not using any of them

1
  • 2
    that is istream::getline not free-function getline – CashCow Mar 7 '12 at 9:02
-1

Change getline(cin, Number) to cin >> Number

0

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.