11
opendir(DIR,"$pwd") or die "Cannot open $pwd\n";
    my @files = readdir(DIR);
    closedir(DIR);
    foreach my $file (@files) {
        next if ($file !~ /\.txt$/i);
        my $mtime = (stat($file))[9];
        print $mtime;
        print "\n";
    }

Basically I want to note the timestamp of all the txt files in a directory. If there is a subdirectory I want to include files in that subdirectory too.

Can someone help me in modifying the above code so that it includes subdirectories too.

if i am using the code below in windows iam getting timestamps of all files which are in folders even outside my folder

 my @dirs = ("C:\\Users\\peter\\Desktop\\folder");
    my %seen;
    while (my $pwd = shift @dirs) {
            opendir(DIR,"$pwd") or die "Cannot open $pwd\n";
            my @files = readdir(DIR);
            closedir(DIR);
            #print @files;
            foreach my $file (@files) {
                    if (-d $file and !$seen{$file}) {
                            $seen{$file} = 1;
                            push @dirs, "$pwd/$file";
                    }
                    next if ($file !~ /\.txt$/i);
                    my $mtime = (stat("$pwd\$file"))[9];
                    print "$pwd $file $mtime";
                    print "\n";
            }
    }

5 Answers 5

19

File::Find is best for this. It is a core module so doesn't need installing. This code does the equivalent of what you seem to have in mind

use strict;
use warnings;

use File::Find;

find(sub {
  if (-f and /\.txt$/) {
    my $mtime = (stat _)[9];
    print "$mtime\n";
  }
}, '.');

where '.' is the root of the directory tree to be scanned; you could use $pwd here if you wish. Within the subroutine, Perl has done a chdir to the directory where it found the file, $_ is set to the filename, and $File::Find::name is set to the full-qualified filename including the path.

3
  • 1
    Not everybody will agree with you on File::Find being best.
    – salva
    Mar 7, 2012 at 12:12
  • 1
    File::Find is slow, and the API is frustrating, but I think it is ideal for something trivial like this. I would like to hear what anyone has against it.
    – Borodin
    Mar 8, 2012 at 15:22
  • 1
    @salva Very old comment I know, but the link now points to a login page. Oct 19, 2016 at 16:08
8
use warnings;
use strict;

my @dirs = (".");
my %seen;
while (my $pwd = shift @dirs) {
        opendir(DIR,"$pwd") or die "Cannot open $pwd\n";
        my @files = readdir(DIR);
        closedir(DIR);
        foreach my $file (@files) {
                next if $file =~ /^\.\.?$/;
                my $path = "$pwd/$file";
                if (-d $path) {
                        next if $seen{$path};
                        $seen{$path} = 1;
                        push @dirs, $path;
                }
                next if ($path !~ /\.txt$/i);
                my $mtime = (stat($path))[9];
                print "$path $mtime\n";
        }
}
10
  • 1
    $file !~ /^\.*$/ is $file =~ /[^.]/. But I have been severely reprimanded in the past for excluding names that are just three dots or longer, as they are valid names for Linux files. So the test should be $file !~ /^\.\.?$/
    – Borodin
    Mar 7, 2012 at 12:05
  • @perreal if i want to open files and search soome particular string in the file and seperate such files, I am thinking to do that with OPEN INPUT, $file , then $lines = <INPUT> then seraching on it , is it fine ? or there is some other easy way
    – Peter
    Mar 7, 2012 at 13:40
  • You can use grep for that. If you don't want to use any tools then it is fine to do what you suggest.
    – perreal
    Mar 7, 2012 at 14:15
  • Hi can you all see the edited question and help me out .. i tried the code in windows , but i am getting timestamps of files which are in folders outside my specified folder too, i have pasted the code in question
    – Peter
    Mar 7, 2012 at 16:06
  • 1
    Can you try these changes? push @dirs, "$pwd\\$file"; my $mtime = (stat("$pwd\\$file"))[9];
    – perreal
    Mar 7, 2012 at 17:23
4

use File::Find::Rule

File::Find::Rule is a friendlier interface to File::Find. It allows you to build rules which specify the desired files and directories.

1

You can use recursion: define a function that goes through files and calls itself on directories. Then call the function on the top directory.

See also File::Find.

2
  • how to differentiate between a file and a directory inside a directory
    – Peter
    Mar 7, 2012 at 11:30
  • 1
    @Peter: use the -d and -f operators, documented here
    – Borodin
    Mar 7, 2012 at 12:09
0

if i am using the code below in windows iam getting timestamps of all files which are in folders even outside my folder

I suspect that the problem may have been an issue with the . and .. directories which if you tried to follow them would have taken you up the directory tree. What you were missing was a:

foreach my $file (@files) {
    # skip . and .. which cause recursion and moving up the tree
    next if $file =~ /^\.\.?$/;
    ...

Your script also suffers from a couple of bugs. $file is not relative to the $dir so -d $file would only work in the current directory and not below.

Here's my fixed version:

use warnings;
use strict;

# if unix, change to "/";
my $FILE_PATH_SLASH = "\\";    
my @dirs = (".");
my %seen;
while (my $dir = shift @dirs) {
        opendir(DIR, $dir) or die "Cannot open $dir\n";
        my @files = readdir(DIR);
        closedir(DIR);
        foreach my $file (@files) {
                # skip . and ..
                next if $file =~ /^\.\.?$/;
                my $path = "$dir$FILE_PATH_SLASH$file";
                if (-d $path) {
                        next if $seen{$path};
                        $seen{$path} = 1;
                        push @dirs, $path;
                }
                next unless $path ~= /\.txt$/i;
                my $mtime = (stat($path))[9];
                print "$path $mtime\n";
        }
}

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.