1

I want to mimick this behavior:

<script src="console.log.1.js"></script>
<script>console.log(2)</script>
<script>console.log(3)</script>

That logs out:

1
2
3

Doing this doesn't work:

<script>
var x = document.createElement("script");
x.src = "console.log.1.js";
x.async = false;
x.defer = false;
document.body.appendChild(x);
console.log("2");
console.log("3");
</script>

It logs out:

2
3
1

The only way I found so far to achieve it:

<script>
document.write("<scrip" + "t src='console.log.1.js'></scrip" + "t>");
</script>
<script>
console.log("2");
console.log("3");
</script>

Is that really the only way to force synchronous loading of external scripts in all browsers? Why doesn't setting async=false, defer=false work?

UPDATE

FYI, if someone is wondering, the following document.write inception works (in Chrome..):

<script>
  // http://jsbin.com/avatiw logs "during"
  document.write('<scrip' + 't>console.log("before");document.write("<scrip" + "t src=\\"http://jsbin.com/avatiw\\"></scrip" + "t>");</scrip' + 't>');
  document.write('<scrip' + 't>console.log("after");</scrip' + 't>');
</script>

Works and logs out:

"before"
"during"
"after"
3
  • Have you considered using document.getElementsByTagName('body')[0].appendChild(x);? But even then, is there a reason you're not appending to the head instead of the body? Mar 7, 2012 at 17:46
  • 1
    I expect that will still log out 231, just like the second example.
    – Karolis
    Mar 7, 2012 at 17:48
  • @DavidThomas: I'm with Karolis. It's not that the script element isn't inserted immediately after the one that's executing (it is, at least on Chrome, according to dev tools), it's the fact that appending a script element in that way triggers an asynchronous operation to download the script. Mar 7, 2012 at 18:02

2 Answers 2

5

Yes, that's the only way to force the script to load during the page parsing. Or at least, the only way I'd be willing to believe worked well cross-browser.

If your script were like this, I could see your thinking:

<script>
var x = document.createElement("script");
x.src = "console.log.1.js";
x.async = false;
x.defer = false;
document.body.appendChild(x);
</script>
<script><!-- note the new script element -->
console.log("2");
console.log("3");
</script>

...because in theory, when the parser hits the script element, it suspends everything (because there might be document.write statements) and calls into the JavaScript layer. So you might think, well, adding a script element to the end of the body at that point would insert it between the two.

But adding a script element via appendChild is just fundamentally different, it's by nature an asynchronous operation (your code continues while the script is being downloaded, which is not the case with script elements in the markup barring the defer or async attributes). I can't point at any one spec to say why, but the behavior you're seeing is exactly what I'd expect. The treatment of script elements inline with the markup is a bit special.

We can see that it's the download that's the issue — at least in Chrome — by comparing the result with using a script element with inline content.

Using an external file (live copy | live source):

<script>
console.log("before");
(function() {
    var s = document.createElement("script");
    s.src = "http://jsbin.com/avatiw"; // Logs the word "during"
    document.body.appendChild(s);
})();
</script>
<script>
console.log("after");
</script>

Result:

before
after
during

Using inline script (live copy | live source — note that I've made no attempt to make this cross-browser, it works in Chrome and Firefox as they support the text property on script elements):

<script>
console.log("before");
(function() {
    var s = document.createElement("script");
    s.text = "console.log('during');";
    document.body.appendChild(s);
})();
</script>
<script>
console.log("after");
</script>

Output:

before
during
after
4
  • Do you have any pointers, specs, etc. or does that come from experience? :) Probably the best place would be looking at the actual source code for firefox/chrome, but that sounds painful.
    – Karolis
    Mar 7, 2012 at 17:50
  • @Karolis: Nothing I can really point out, which granted is a bit weak. :-) I updated the answer with a bit more discussion, fwiw. Mar 7, 2012 at 18:00
  • I believe it is implied by the HTML5 spec. w3.org/TR/html5/embedded-content-0.html#dom-document-write
    – Tim Down
    Mar 7, 2012 at 18:01
  • @Tim: Hard to say. While that explains why document.write behaves the way it doesn't, it doesn't necessarily tell us why appendChild doesn't behave the same way. Mar 7, 2012 at 18:08
0

I actually found that using a LazyLoad plugin was perfect for this use case, i.e.

if (typeof jQuery === 'undefined')
    LazyLoad.js('//ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/1.11.1/jquery.min.js', function() { 
        initialize(); 
    });
else
    initialize();

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