136

I am calling a PHP script whenever a webpage loads. However, there is a parameter that the PHP script needs to run (which I normally pass through the command line when I am testing the script).

How can I pass this argument every time the script is run when the page loads?

  • How do you run it? – zerkms Mar 8 '12 at 2:36
  • 1
    Can you post your code, please? – SenorAmor Mar 8 '12 at 2:37
  • 1
    so you want to run a command line? or a php script? – Christopher Pelayo Mar 8 '12 at 2:41
  • Okay, thank you guys. I got the answers below: use $GET and pass it as a parameter value in the url itself. – Nick Mar 8 '12 at 8:28
226

Presumably you're passing the arguments in on the command line as follows:

php /path/to/wwwpublic/path/to/script.php arg1 arg2

... and then accessing them in the script thusly:

<?php
// $argv[0] is '/path/to/wwwpublic/path/to/script.php'
$argument1 = $argv[1];
$argument2 = $argv[2];
?>

What you need to be doing when passing arguments through HTTP (accessing the script over the web) is using the query string and access them through the $_GET superglobal:

Go to http://yourdomain.com/path/to/script.php?argument1=arg1&argument2=arg2

... and access:

<?php
$argument1 = $_GET['argument1'];
$argument2 = $_GET['argument2'];
?>

If you want the script to run regardless of where you call it from (command line or from the browser) you'll want something like the following:

EDIT: as pointed out by Cthulhu in the comments, the most direct way to test which environment you're executing in is to use the PHP_SAPI constant. I've updated the code accordingly:

<?php
if (PHP_SAPI === 'cli') {
    $argument1 = $argv[1];
    $argument2 = $argv[2];
}
else {
    $argument1 = $_GET['argument1'];
    $argument2 = $_GET['argument2'];
}
?>
  • 3
    Your last code sample will throw notices – zerkms Mar 8 '12 at 2:53
  • 2
    perhaps "if (isset($_GET))" – Jason Mar 8 '12 at 3:26
  • I would use empty($_GET). $_GET is a predefined value, so I'm pretty sure it is always set, but empty if there are no GET parameters set. empty() returns false for empty strings and arrays. – Tim S. Mar 7 '13 at 8:15
  • 3
    I realise i'm late for the party, but the proper way to check is PHP_SAPI === 'cli'. – Cthulhu Mar 11 '15 at 8:49
  • 1
    @emanueledelgrande I'm not entirely sure I follow what you're asking, but I'll try. .htaccess is an Apache file - Apache processes incoming requests with the directives in .htaccess and then invokes PHP to build the response to the request. So, if you're in the command line, .htaccess will be completely ignored. If you're accessing a script through the web, and you want to add new querystring arguments after receiving the request, that's typically done with mod_rewrite. If that doesn't sufficiently answer your question, I suggest you post a brand new question. – Jason Nov 23 '17 at 16:39
16
$argv[0]; // the script name
$argv[1]; // the first parameter
$argv[2]; // the second parameter

If you want to all the script to run regardless of where you call it from (command line or from the browser) you'll want something like the following:

<?php
if ($_GET) {
    $argument1 = $_GET['argument1'];
    $argument2 = $_GET['argument2'];
} else {
    $argument1 = $argv[1];
    $argument2 = $argv[2];
}
?>

To call from command line chmod 755 /var/www/webroot/index.php and use

/usr/bin/php /var/www/webroot/index.php arg1 arg2

To call from the browser, use

http://www.mydomain.com/index.php?argument1=arg1&argument2=arg2

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