Disregarding performance, will I get the same result from query A and B below? How about C and D?

-- A
select *
from   a left join b
           on <blahblah>
       left join c
           on <blahblan>


-- B
select *
from   a left join c
           on <blahblah>
       left join b
           on <blahblan>  

-- C
select *
from   a join b
           on <blahblah>
       join c
           on <blahblan>


-- D
select *
from   a join c
           on <blahblah>
       join b
           on <blahblan>  
  • 6
    What's <blahblah>? are you joining A to B and A to C, or are you joining A to B and B to C? – beny23 Mar 8 '12 at 8:57
  • 1
    Hi Beny, the code in my question is an abstraction. I'm not concerned on joining A to B or A to C, I just want to know will the syntax like that will provide identical results. – Ogrish Man Mar 8 '12 at 9:22
up vote 174 down vote accepted

For INNER joins, no, the order doesn't matter. The queries will return same results, as long as you change your selects from SELECT * to SELECT a.*, b.*, c.*.


For (LEFT, RIGHT or FULL) OUTER joins, yes, the order matters - and (updated) things are much more complicated.

First, outer joins are not commutative, so a LEFT JOIN b is not the same as b LEFT JOIN a

Outer joins are not associative either, so in your examples which involve both (commutativity and associativity) properties:

a LEFT JOIN b 
    ON b.ab_id = a.ab_id
  LEFT JOIN c
    ON c.ac_id = a.ac_id

is equivalent to:

a LEFT JOIN c 
    ON c.ac_id = a.ac_id
  LEFT JOIN b
    ON b.ab_id = a.ab_id

but:

a LEFT JOIN b 
    ON  b.ab_id = a.ab_id
  LEFT JOIN c
    ON  c.ac_id = a.ac_id
    AND c.bc_id = b.bc_id

is not equivalent to:

a LEFT JOIN c 
    ON  c.ac_id = a.ac_id
  LEFT JOIN b
    ON  b.ab_id = a.ab_id
    AND b.bc_id = c.bc_id

Another (hopefully simpler) associativity example. Think of this as (a LEFT JOIN b) LEFT JOIN c:

a LEFT JOIN b 
    ON b.ab_id = a.ab_id          -- AB condition
 LEFT JOIN c
    ON c.bc_id = b.bc_id          -- BC condition

This is equivalent to a LEFT JOIN (b LEFT JOIN c):

a LEFT JOIN  
    b LEFT JOIN c
        ON c.bc_id = b.bc_id          -- BC condition
    ON b.ab_id = a.ab_id          -- AB condition

only because we have "nice" ON conditions. Both ON b.ab_id = a.ab_id and c.bc_id = b.bc_id are equality checks and do not involve NULL comparisons.

You can even have conditions with other operators or more complex ones like: ON a.x <= b.x or ON a.x = 7 or ON a.x LIKE b.x or ON (a.x, a.y) = (b.x, b.y) and the two queries would still be equivalent.

If however, any of these involved IS NULL or a function that is related to nulls like COALESCE(), for example if the condition was b.ab_id IS NULL, then the two queries would not be equivalent.

  • 3
    It's more correct to say that the outer join is associative as long as neither predicate can be satisfied by a row in which all columns from one table are NULL, than to say that it's associative as long as the predicates don't involve IS NULL or 'a function that is related to nulls'. One can easily imagine a predicate that satisfies the former description but not the latter, like a.somecol > 0 OR b.someothercol > 0; associativity could fail for that condition. – Mark Amery Nov 17 '13 at 11:03
  • But yeah, I think that it's technically true to say that OUTER JOIN is associative as long as the predicate doesn't satisfy either of the conditions I describe here: stackoverflow.com/questions/20022196/… (the first of which also breaks associativity for INNER JOINs, but is such a cheap and obvious approach to breaking it that perhaps it's not worth mentioning.) It's also worth pointing out that the most common kind of JOIN - JOINing on a foreign key - doesn't satisfy either of those conditions and thus is nice and associative. – Mark Amery Nov 17 '13 at 11:06
  • @MarkAmery Thank you, I was having a hard time structuring my sentences on that point (and I have already upvoted that answer of yours ;) – ypercubeᵀᴹ Nov 17 '13 at 11:10
  • ypercube i have a INNER JOIN and a following LEFT JOIN. Does it work like that first the query will Filter the records on the base of INNER JOIN and then will apply LEFT JOIN to the Filtered records? – Muhammad Babar Feb 12 '15 at 13:09
  • In fact, all join types are associative, as specified by the SQL standard and according to mathematical definitions of associativity, but they don't appear associative because rearranging the parentheses requires moving the ON clause (i.e. the "join specification") to a new location. This is only syntax, though. If you use relational algebra notation (where the join specification is placed below the join operator), then associativity becomes more evident. Your argument only displays that outer joins are not commutative, which is correct – Lukas Eder May 9 '15 at 15:51

for regular Joins, it doesn't. TableA join TableB will produce the same execution plan as TableB join TableA (so your C and D examples would be the same)

for left and right joins it does. TableA left Join TableB is different than TableB left Join TableA, BUT its the same than TableB right Join TableA

  • 2
    This only addresses commutativity, but the examples in the question show that the asker is interested in associativity. ypercube's answer addresses both. – Mark Amery Dec 22 '14 at 22:50

If you try joining C on a field from B before joining B, i.e.:

SELECT A.x, A.y, A.z FROM A 
   INNER JOIN C
       on B.x = C.x
   INNER JOIN b
       on A.x = B.x

your query will fail, so in this case the order matters.

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