897

I can run this query to get the sizes of all tables in a MySQL database:

show table status from myDatabaseName;

I would like some help in understanding the results. I am looking for tables with the largest sizes.

Which column should I look at?

  • 8
    What do you mean by size? Number of rows? Bytes taken on disk? – Mark Byers Mar 8 '12 at 15:32
  • @Mark i want size on disk is this right method ? # du -sh /mnt/mysql_data/openx/f_scraper_banner_details.MYI 79G /mnt/mysql_data/openx/f_scraper_banner_details.MYI – Ashish Karpe Apr 6 '16 at 14:10
  • 3
    Related, if it's of interest, I wrote a Describe All Tables in this Answer. – Drew Aug 1 '16 at 15:40

16 Answers 16

1954

You can use this query to show the size of a table (although you need to substitute the variables first):

SELECT 
    table_name AS `Table`, 
    round(((data_length + index_length) / 1024 / 1024), 2) `Size in MB` 
FROM information_schema.TABLES 
WHERE table_schema = "$DB_NAME"
    AND table_name = "$TABLE_NAME";

or this query to list the size of every table in every database, largest first:

SELECT 
     table_schema as `Database`, 
     table_name AS `Table`, 
     round(((data_length + index_length) / 1024 / 1024), 2) `Size in MB` 
FROM information_schema.TABLES 
ORDER BY (data_length + index_length) DESC;
| improve this answer | |
  • 3
    Thank you, its working just fine, though I am not sure it takes Blobs in consideration. – David Jul 29 '13 at 11:40
  • 5
    Note, you can also use "IN" to specify multiple tables, e.g AND table_name IN ('table_1', 'table_2', 'table_3'); – David Thomas Nov 7 '13 at 23:01
  • 6
    AFAICT, this will only count the lengths of static size fields correctly. How would you count VARCHAR and BLOB types? – l0b0 Feb 11 '14 at 15:09
  • 3
    @kasimir At some point the world got confusing and some standards organizations and hardware manufacturers decided that it was better that a kilobyte be defined on the decimal system. The IEC standard now calls the base 2 kilobyte (1024 bytes) a kibibyte (KiB). At any rate, MySQL doesn't know, so if you want IEC decimal kilobytes, divide by 1000. – russellpierce Sep 17 '15 at 11:38
  • 9
    Will this work for the InnoDB storage engine? According to mysql doc here - dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.7/en/show-table-status.html, the data_length field for that engine contains the size of the clustered index. That won't correctly represent the size of the data. Will it? – euphoria83 Jan 5 '17 at 20:47
96
SELECT TABLE_NAME AS "Table Name", 
table_rows AS "Quant of Rows", ROUND( (
data_length + index_length
) /1024, 2 ) AS "Total Size Kb"
FROM information_schema.TABLES
WHERE information_schema.TABLES.table_schema = 'YOUR SCHEMA NAME/DATABASE NAME HERE'
LIMIT 0 , 30

You can get schema name from "information_schema" -> SCHEMATA table -> "SCHEMA_NAME" column


Additional You can get size of the mysql databases as following.

SELECT table_schema "DB Name", 
Round(Sum(data_length + index_length) / 1024 / 1024, 1) "DB Size in MB" 
FROM   information_schema.tables 
GROUP  BY table_schema; 

Result

DB Name              |      DB Size in MB

mydatabase_wrdp             39.1
information_schema          0.0

You can get additional details in here.

| improve this answer | |
41
SELECT 
    table_name AS "Table",  
    round(((data_length + index_length) / 1024 / 1024), 2) as size   
FROM information_schema.TABLES  
WHERE table_schema = "YOUR_DATABASE_NAME"  
ORDER BY size DESC; 

This sorts the sizes (DB Size in MB).

| improve this answer | |
30

If you want a query to use currently selected database. simply copy paste this query. (No modification required)

SELECT table_name ,
  round(((data_length + index_length) / 1024 / 1024), 2) as SIZE_MB
FROM information_schema.TABLES
WHERE table_schema = DATABASE() ORDER BY SIZE_MB DESC;
| improve this answer | |
  • 5
    Or even shorter (without subquery): SELECT table_name, round(((data_length + index_length) / 1024 / 1024), 2) SIZE_MB FROM information_schema.TABLES WHERE table_schema=DATABASE() ORDER BY (data_length + index_length) ASC; – Onkeltem Nov 28 '17 at 11:19
15

There is an easy way to get many informations using Workbench:

  • Right-click the schema name and click "Schema inspector".

  • In the resulting window you have a number of tabs. The first tab "Info" shows a rough estimate of the database size in MB.

  • The second tab, "Tables", shows Data length and other details for each table.

| improve this answer | |
  • I didn't have the 'info' tab on my Mac client v 6.0.9 – Neil Mar 29 '16 at 15:04
  • Great!!! In MySQL Workbench there's also a "Table Inspector" for each table. Not properly quick but very handy! – T30 Mar 22 '17 at 9:49
11
  • Size of all tables:

    Suppose your database or TABLE_SCHEMA name is "news_alert". Then this query will show the size of all tables in the database.

    SELECT
      TABLE_NAME AS `Table`,
      ROUND(((DATA_LENGTH + INDEX_LENGTH) / 1024 / 1024),2) AS `Size (MB)`
    FROM
      information_schema.TABLES
    WHERE
      TABLE_SCHEMA = "news_alert"
    ORDER BY
      (DATA_LENGTH + INDEX_LENGTH)
    DESC;
    

    Output:

        +---------+-----------+
        | Table   | Size (MB) |
        +---------+-----------+
        | news    |      0.08 |
        | keyword |      0.02 |
        +---------+-----------+
        2 rows in set (0.00 sec)
    
  • For the specific table:

    Suppose your TABLE_NAME is "news". Then SQL query will be-

    SELECT
      TABLE_NAME AS `Table`,
      ROUND(((DATA_LENGTH + INDEX_LENGTH) / 1024 / 1024),2) AS `Size (MB)`
    FROM
      information_schema.TABLES
    WHERE
        TABLE_SCHEMA = "news_alert"
      AND
        TABLE_NAME = "news"
    ORDER BY
      (DATA_LENGTH + INDEX_LENGTH)
    DESC;
    

    Output:

    +-------+-----------+
    | Table | Size (MB) |
    +-------+-----------+
    | news  |      0.08 |
    +-------+-----------+
    1 row in set (0.00 sec)
    
| improve this answer | |
8

Try the following shell command (replace DB_NAME with your database name):

mysql -uroot <<<"SELECT table_name AS 'Tables', round(((data_length + index_length) / 1024 / 1024), 2) 'Size in MB' FROM information_schema.TABLES WHERE table_schema = \"DB_NAME\" ORDER BY (data_length + index_length) DESC;" | head

For Drupal/drush solution, check the following example script which will display the biggest tables in use:

#!/bin/sh
DB_NAME=$(drush status --fields=db-name --field-labels=0 | tr -d '\r\n ')
drush sqlq "SELECT table_name AS 'Tables', round(((data_length + index_length) / 1024 / 1024), 2) 'Size in MB' FROM information_schema.TABLES WHERE table_schema = \"${DB_NAME}\" ORDER BY (data_length + index_length) DESC;" | head -n20
| improve this answer | |
6

Heres another way of working this out from using the bash command line.

for i in mysql -NB -e 'show databases'; do echo $i; mysql -e "SELECT table_name AS 'Tables', round(((data_length+index_length)/1024/1024),2) 'Size in MB' FROM information_schema.TABLES WHERE table_schema =\"$i\" ORDER BY (data_length + index_length) DESC" ; done

| improve this answer | |
6

If you are using phpmyadmin then just go to the table structure

e.g.

Space usage
Data    1.5 MiB
Index   0   B
Total   1.5 Mi
| improve this answer | |
4

Adapted from ChapMic's answer to suite my particular need.

Only specify your database name, then sort all the tables in descending order - from LARGEST to SMALLEST table inside selected database. Needs only 1 variable to be replaced = your database name.

SELECT 
table_name AS `Table`, 
round(((data_length + index_length) / 1024 / 1024), 2) AS `size`
FROM information_schema.TABLES 
WHERE table_schema = "YOUR_DATABASE_NAME_HERE"
ORDER BY size DESC;
| improve this answer | |
3

If you have ssh access, you might want to simply try du -hc /var/lib/mysql (or different datadir, as set in your my.cnf) as well.

| improve this answer | |
  • Finally an answer that doesn't rely on information_schema. In my case it reported 660MB while the actual size on the filesystem is 1.8GB – php_nub_qq May 6 at 14:27
2

Another way of showing the number of rows and space occupied and ordering by it.

SELECT
     table_schema as `Database`,
     table_name AS `Table`,
     table_rows AS "Quant of Rows",
     round(((data_length + index_length) / 1024 / 1024/ 1024), 2) `Size in GB`
FROM information_schema.TABLES
WHERE table_schema = 'yourDatabaseName'
ORDER BY (data_length + index_length) DESC;  

The only string you have to substitute in this query is "yourDatabaseName".

| improve this answer | |
2

I find the existing answers don't actually give the size of tables on the disk, which is more helpful. This query gives more accurate disk estimate compared to table size based on data_length & index. I had to use this for an AWS RDS instance where you cannot physically examine the disk and check file sizes.

select NAME as TABLENAME,FILE_SIZE/(1024*1024*1024) as ACTUAL_FILE_SIZE_GB
, round(((data_length + index_length) / 1024 / 1024/1024), 2) as REPORTED_TABLE_SIZE_GB 
from INFORMATION_SCHEMA.INNODB_SYS_TABLESPACES s
join INFORMATION_SCHEMA.TABLES t 
on NAME = Concat(table_schema,'/',table_name)
order by FILE_SIZE desc
| improve this answer | |
1

Calculate the total size of the database at the end:

(SELECT 
  table_name AS `Table`, 
  round(((data_length + index_length) / 1024 / 1024), 2) `Size in MB` 
  FROM information_schema.TABLES 
  WHERE table_schema = "$DB_NAME"
)
UNION ALL
(SELECT 
  'TOTAL:',
  SUM(round(((data_length + index_length) / 1024 / 1024), 2) )
  FROM information_schema.TABLES 
  WHERE table_schema = "$DB_NAME"
)
| improve this answer | |
1
SELECT TABLE_NAME AS table_name, 
table_rows AS QuantofRows, 
ROUND((data_length + index_length) /1024, 2 ) AS total_size_kb 
FROM information_schema.TABLES
WHERE information_schema.TABLES.table_schema = 'db'
ORDER BY (data_length + index_length) DESC; 

all 2 above is tested on mysql

| improve this answer | |
1

This should be tested in mysql, not postgresql:

SELECT table_schema, # "DB Name", 
Round(Sum(data_length + index_length) / 1024 / 1024, 1) # "DB Size in MB" 
FROM   information_schema.tables 
GROUP  BY table_schema; 
| improve this answer | |
  • While this might answer the authors question, it lacks some explaining words and/or links to documentation. Raw code snippets are not very helpful without some phrases around them. You may also find how to write a good answer very helpful. Please edit your answer - From Review – Nick Dec 4 '18 at 5:51
  • @Nick why still banned? – William Dec 18 '18 at 22:39
  • Sorry, I don't know the answer to that - I'm not a moderator. – Nick Dec 18 '18 at 22:55

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