This is the code I have so far:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System;
using System.Net.Http;
using System.Web;
using System.Net;
using System.IO;

namespace ConsoleProgram
{
    public class Class1
    {
        private const string URL = "https://sub.domain.com/objects.json?api_key=123";
        private const string DATA = @"{""object"":{""name"":""Name""}}";

        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            Class1.CreateObject();
        }

        private static void CreateObject()
        {
            HttpWebRequest request = (HttpWebRequest)WebRequest.Create(URL);
            request.Method = "POST";
            request.ContentType = "application/json"; 
            request.ContentLength = DATA.Length;
            StreamWriter requestWriter = new StreamWriter(request.GetRequestStream(), System.Text.Encoding.ASCII);
            requestWriter.Write(DATA);
            requestWriter.Close();

             try {
                WebResponse webResponse = request.GetResponse();
                Stream webStream = webResponse.GetResponseStream();
                StreamReader responseReader = new StreamReader(webStream);
                string response = responseReader.ReadToEnd();
                Console.Out.WriteLine(response);
                responseReader.Close();
            } catch (Exception e) {
                Console.Out.WriteLine("-----------------");
                Console.Out.WriteLine(e.Message);
            }

        }
    }
}

The problem is that I think the exception block is being triggered (because when I remove the try-catch, I get a server error (500) message. But I don't see the Console.Out lines I put in the catch block.

My Console:

The thread 'vshost.NotifyLoad' (0x1a20) has exited with code 0 (0x0).
The thread '<No Name>' (0x1988) has exited with code 0 (0x0).
The thread 'vshost.LoadReference' (0x1710) has exited with code 0 (0x0).
'ConsoleApplication1.vshost.exe' (Managed (v4.0.30319)): Loaded 'c:\users\l. preston sego iii\documents\visual studio 11\Projects\ConsoleApplication1\ConsoleApplication1\bin\Debug\ConsoleApplication1.exe', Symbols loaded.
'ConsoleApplication1.vshost.exe' (Managed (v4.0.30319)): Loaded 'C:\Windows\Microsoft.Net\assembly\GAC_MSIL\System.Configuration\v4.0_4.0.0.0__b03f5f7f11d50a3a\System.Configuration.dll', Skipped loading symbols. Module is optimized and the debugger option 'Just My Code' is enabled.
A first chance exception of type 'System.Net.WebException' occurred in System.dll
The thread 'vshost.RunParkingWindow' (0x184c) has exited with code 0 (0x0).
The thread '<No Name>' (0x1810) has exited with code 0 (0x0).
The program '[2780] ConsoleApplication1.vshost.exe: Program Trace' has exited with code 0 (0x0).
The program '[2780] ConsoleApplication1.vshost.exe: Managed (v4.0.30319)' has exited with code 0 (0x0).

I'm using Visual Studio 2011 Beta, and .NET 4.5 Beta.

10 Answers 10

up vote 319 down vote accepted

The ASP.Net Web API has replaced the WCF Web API previously mentioned.

I thought I'd post an updated answer since most of these responses are from early 2012, and this thread is one of the top results when doing a Google search for "call restful service c#".

Current guidance from Microsoft is to use the Microsoft ASP.NET Web API Client Libraries to consume a RESTful service. This is available as a NuGet package, Microsoft.AspNet.WebApi.Client. You will need to add this NuGet package to your solution.

Here's how your example would look when implemented using the ASP.Net Web API Client Library:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Net.Http;
using System.Net.Http.Headers; 

namespace ConsoleProgram
{
    public class DataObject
    {
        public string Name { get; set; }
    }

    public class Class1
    {
        private const string URL = "https://sub.domain.com/objects.json";
        private string urlParameters = "?api_key=123";

        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            HttpClient client = new HttpClient();
            client.BaseAddress = new Uri(URL);

            // Add an Accept header for JSON format.
            client.DefaultRequestHeaders.Accept.Add(
            new MediaTypeWithQualityHeaderValue("application/json"));

            // List data response.
            HttpResponseMessage response = client.GetAsync(urlParameters).Result;  // Blocking call! Program will wait here until a response is received or a timeout occurs.
            if (response.IsSuccessStatusCode)
            {
                // Parse the response body.
                var dataObjects = response.Content.ReadAsAsync<IEnumerable<DataObject>>().Result;  //Make sure to add a reference to System.Net.Http.Formatting.dll
                foreach (var d in dataObjects)
                {
                    Console.WriteLine("{0}", d.Name);
                }
            }
            else
            {
                Console.WriteLine("{0} ({1})", (int)response.StatusCode, response.ReasonPhrase);
            }

            //Make any other calls using HttpClient here.

            //Dispose once all HttpClient calls are complete. This is not necessary if the containing object will be disposed of; for example in this case the HttpClient instance will be disposed automatically when the application terminates so the following call is superfluous.
            client.Dispose();
        }
    }
}

If you plan on making multiple requests, you should re-use your HttpClient instance. See this question and its answers for more details on why a using statement was not used on the HttpClient instance in this case: Do HttpClient and HttpClientHandler have to be disposed?

For more details, including other examples, go here: http://www.asp.net/web-api/overview/web-api-clients/calling-a-web-api-from-a-net-client

This blog post may also be useful: http://johnnycode.com/2012/02/23/consuming-your-own-asp-net-web-api-rest-service/

  • 5
    Thanks! I needed to install the WebApi client NuGet package for this to work for me: Install-Package Microsoft.AspNet.WebApi.Client – Ev. May 22 '14 at 7:38
  • 3
    If you need to mock out your REST integration, even with the client libraries it's still not easy. Try RestSharp? – Rob Church Jan 7 '16 at 15:55
  • 3
    To make this answer even better than it already is, you should wrap the HttpClient declaration into a using statement to better manage your resource :) – Daniel Siebert Sep 13 '16 at 13:07
  • 6
    Tried to use but unable to use ReadAsAsync(), getting error "HttpContent does not contain a definition for 'ReadAsAsync' and no extension method. – Robert Green MBA Mar 27 '17 at 10:37
  • 4
    @RobertGreenMBA: To get the extension method ReadAsAsync(), add a reference to System.Net.Http.Formatting.dll. (Intuitive, right?) – A.Franklin Jun 8 '17 at 19:34

My suggestion would be to use RestSharp. You can make calls to REST services and have them cast into POCO objects with very little boilerplate code to actually have to parse through the response. This will not solve your particular error, but answers your overall question of how to make calls to REST services. Having to change your code to use it should pay off in the ease of use and robustness moving forward. That is just my 2 cents though

  • 3
    RestSharp and JSON.NET is definitely the way to go. I found the MS toolset to be lacking and likely to fail. – cbuteau Sep 24 '15 at 13:59
  • 1
    Another vote for RestSharp because you can mock it out for testing much, much more easily than the WebApi Client libraries. – Rob Church Jan 7 '16 at 15:54
  • 1
    for mono users - RestSharp seems to be using the System.Net WebRequest apis - which, in my experience isn't as reliable as the .net implementations. ('random' hangs) – Tom Jul 12 '16 at 17:10
  • 2
    It would be nice to have an example in this answer please. – Caltor Jan 26 '17 at 13:35
  • 1
    restsharp's default json deserializer is not as powerful as json.net – user3791372 Feb 8 '17 at 17:09

Unrelated, I'm sure, but do wrap your IDisposable objects in using blocks to ensure proper disposal:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System;
using System.Web;
using System.Net;
using System.IO;

namespace ConsoleProgram
{
    public class Class1
    {
        private const string URL = "https://sub.domain.com/objects.json?api_key=123";
        private const string DATA = @"{""object"":{""name"":""Name""}}";

        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            Class1.CreateObject();
        }

        private static void CreateObject()
        {
            HttpWebRequest request = (HttpWebRequest)WebRequest.Create(URL);
            request.Method = "POST";
            request.ContentType = "application/json";
            request.ContentLength = DATA.Length;
            using (Stream webStream = request.GetRequestStream())
            using (StreamWriter requestWriter = new StreamWriter(webStream, System.Text.Encoding.ASCII))
            {
                requestWriter.Write(DATA);
            }

            try
            {
                WebResponse webResponse = request.GetResponse();
                using (Stream webStream = webResponse.GetResponseStream())
                {
                    if (webStream != null)
                    {
                        using (StreamReader responseReader = new StreamReader(webStream))
                        {
                            string response = responseReader.ReadToEnd();
                            Console.Out.WriteLine(response);
                        }
                    }
                }
            }
            catch (Exception e)
            {
                Console.Out.WriteLine("-----------------");
                Console.Out.WriteLine(e.Message);
            }

        }
    }
}
  • 2
    Nice answer which doesn't use any extra packages outside of the regular .NET environment. – palswim Jan 2 at 22:10

Please use below code for your REST api request

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.IO;
using System.Linq;
using System.Net;
using System.Net.Http;
using System.Text;
using System.Json;

namespace ConsoleApplication2
{
    class Program
    {
        private const string URL = "https://XXXX/rest/api/2/component";
        private const string DATA = @"{
    ""name"": ""Component 2"",
    ""description"": ""This is a JIRA component"",
    ""leadUserName"": ""xx"",
    ""assigneeType"": ""PROJECT_LEAD"",
    ""isAssigneeTypeValid"": false,
    ""project"": ""TP""}";

        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            AddComponent();
        }

        private static void AddComponent()
        {
            System.Net.Http.HttpClient client = new System.Net.Http.HttpClient();
            client.BaseAddress = new System.Uri(URL);
            byte[] cred = UTF8Encoding.UTF8.GetBytes("username:password");
            client.DefaultRequestHeaders.Authorization = new System.Net.Http.Headers.AuthenticationHeaderValue("Basic", Convert.ToBase64String(cred));
            client.DefaultRequestHeaders.Accept.Add(new System.Net.Http.Headers.MediaTypeWithQualityHeaderValue("application/json"));

            System.Net.Http.HttpContent content = new StringContent(DATA, UTF8Encoding.UTF8, "application/json");
            HttpResponseMessage messge = client.PostAsync(URL, content).Result;
            string description = string.Empty;
            if (messge.IsSuccessStatusCode)
            {
                string result = messge.Content.ReadAsStringAsync().Result;
                description = result;
            }
        }
    }
}
  • -1: .net is a managed platform, but HttpClient is unmanaged (meaning you MUST use using to tell it when it can dispose those unmanaged pointers). Without it, your code won't scale to a couple of users (and, yes, this IS important, so important that the language have a specific keyword to deal with it). – JCKödel Oct 20 '17 at 15:47

Update for calling a REST API when using .NET 4.5.

I would suggest DalSoft.RestClient (caveat I created it). The reason being because it uses dynamic typing you can wrap everything up in one fluent call including serialization/de-serialization. Below is a working PUT example:

dynamic client = new RestClient("http://jsonplaceholder.typicode.com");

var post = new Post { title = "foo", body = "bar", userId = 10 };

var result = await client.Posts(1).Put(post);

Check out Refit for making calls to rest services from .net. I've found it very easy to use: https://github.com/paulcbetts/refit

Refit: The automatic type-safe REST library for .NET Core, Xamarin and .NET

Refit is a library heavily inspired by Square's Retrofit library, and it turns your REST API into a live interface:

public interface IGitHubApi {
        [Get("/users/{user}")]
        Task<User> GetUser(string user); } The RestService class generates an implementation of IGitHubApi that uses HttpClient to make its calls:

var gitHubApi = RestService.For<IGitHubApi>("https://api.github.com");

var octocat = await gitHubApi.GetUser("octocat");
    var TakingRequset = WebRequest.Create("http://xxx.acv.com/MethodName/Get");
    TakingRequset.Method = "POST";
    TakingRequset.ContentType = "text/xml;charset=utf-8";
    TakingRequset.PreAuthenticate = true;

    //---Serving Request path query
     var PAQ = TakingRequset.RequestUri.PathAndQuery;

    //---creating your xml as per the host reqirement
    string xmlroot=@"<root><childnodes>passing parameters</childnodes></root>";
    string xmlroot2=@"<root><childnodes>passing parameters</childnodes></root>";

    //---Adding Headers as requested by host 
    xmlroot2 = (xmlroot2 + "XXX---");
    //---Adding Headers Value as requested by host 
  //  var RequestheaderVales = Method(xmlroot2);

    WebProxy proxy = new WebProxy("XXXXX-----llll", 8080);
    proxy.Credentials = new NetworkCredential("XXX---uuuu", "XXX----", "XXXX----");
    System.Net.WebRequest.DefaultWebProxy = proxy;


    // Adding The Request into Headers
    TakingRequset.Headers.Add("xxx", "Any Request Variable ");
    TakingRequset.Headers.Add("xxx", "Any Request Variable");

    byte[] byteData = Encoding.UTF8.GetBytes(xmlroot);
    TakingRequset.ContentLength = byteData.Length;

    using (Stream postStream = TakingRequset.GetRequestStream())
    {
        postStream.Write(byteData, 0, byteData.Length);
        postStream.Close();
    }



    StreamReader stredr = new StreamReader(TakingRequset.GetResponse().GetResponseStream());
    string response = stredr.ReadToEnd();

This is an example code that works for sure. It took me a day to make this to read a set of object from Rest service:

RootObject is the type of the object Im reading from the rest service.

string url = @"http://restcountries.eu/rest/v1";
DataContractJsonSerializer serializer = new DataContractJsonSerializer(typeof(IEnumerable<RootObject>));
WebClient syncClient = new WebClient();
string content = syncClient.DownloadString(url);

using (MemoryStream memo = new MemoryStream(Encoding.Unicode.GetBytes(content)))
{
    IEnumerable<RootObject> countries = (IEnumerable<RootObject>)serializer.ReadObject(memo);    
}

Console.Read();

Since you are using Visual Studio 11 Beta you will want to use the latest and greatest. The new Web Api contains classes for this.

See HttpClient: http://wcf.codeplex.com/wikipage?title=WCF%20HTTP

  • While this link may answer the question, it is better to include the essential parts of the answer here and provide the link for reference. Link-only answers can become invalid if the linked page changes. - From Review – derloopkat Jun 29 at 15:15

GET:

// GET JSON Response
public WeatherResponseModel GET(string url) {
    WeatherResponseModel model = new WeatherResponseModel();
    HttpWebRequest request = (HttpWebRequest)WebRequest.Create(url);
    try {
        WebResponse response = request.GetResponse();
        using(Stream responseStream = response.GetResponseStream()) {
            StreamReader reader = new StreamReader(responseStream, Encoding.UTF8);
            model = JsonConvert.DeserializeObject < WeatherResponseModel > (reader.ReadToEnd());
        }
    } catch (WebException ex) {
        WebResponse errorResponse = ex.Response;
        using(Stream responseStream = errorResponse.GetResponseStream()) {
            StreamReader reader = new StreamReader(responseStream, Encoding.GetEncoding("utf-8"));
            String errorText = reader.ReadToEnd();
            // log errorText
        }
        throw;
    }

    return model;
}

POST:

// POST a JSON string
void POST(string url, string jsonContent) {
    HttpWebRequest request = (HttpWebRequest)WebRequest.Create(url);
    request.Method = "POST";

    System.Text.UTF8Encoding encoding = new System.Text.UTF8Encoding();
    Byte[]byteArray = encoding.GetBytes(jsonContent);

    request.ContentLength = byteArray.Length;
    request.ContentType =  @ "application/json";

    using(Stream dataStream = request.GetRequestStream()) {
        dataStream.Write(byteArray, 0, byteArray.Length);
    }
    long length = 0;
    try {
        using(HttpWebResponse response = (HttpWebResponse)request.GetResponse()) {
            // got response
            length = response.ContentLength;
        }
    } catch (WebException ex) {
        WebResponse errorResponse = ex.Response;
        using(Stream responseStream = errorResponse.GetResponseStream()) {
            StreamReader reader = new StreamReader(responseStream, Encoding.GetEncoding("utf-8"));
            String errorText = reader.ReadToEnd();
            // log errorText
        }
        throw;
    }
}

Note: To serialize and desirialze JSON I used Newtonsoft.Json NuGet package.

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