70

I'm currently working on a PHP OpenID provider that will work over HTTPS (hence SSL encrypted).
Is it wrong for me to transmit the password as plain text? HTTPS in theory, cannot be intercepted, so I don't see anything wrong. Or is this unsafe at some level and I'm failing to see this?

98

It is safe. That's how the entire web works. All passwords in forms are always sent in plain text, so its up to HTTPS to secure it.

  • 17
    Minor nitpick: some login forms use JavaScript to hash the password instead of sending it plain text. – Thorarin Jun 7 '09 at 18:35
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    @Thorarin if they truly hash it, that means the server is storing the password in plain text so it can hash with the same salt to verify. Ick! Sending the password in ssl wrapped text is better, as the server does not then need to store the password in plain text. – DGM Feb 14 '10 at 20:59
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    @DGM: double hashing is also an option, so plain text passwords are not strictly necessary. – Thorarin Feb 16 '10 at 13:43
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    @Denis: client side hashing doesn't really help much. It may make things a bit harder than plain text, but somebody who really wants to steal a password can do it with no problems. Only would safely work if you send at least a one-time token over a secure channel (ssl), in which case you might as well just send the password in SSL to start with. – Eduardo Scoz Jul 6 '11 at 13:57
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    I am just saying that Yahoo felt that client side hashing was secure enough until they could afford to move all the way to ssl. But hey, I am all for https :) – Denis Jul 6 '11 at 18:16
57

You still need to make sure you send it via POST request, not GET. If you send it via GET request, it could be saved in plaintext in the user's browser history logs or the webserver's access logs.

  • 5
    Yes, I knew that, but it's still a good comment to leave behind for others that come looking here. :) – WhyNotHugo Jun 21 '14 at 8:24
20

If HTTP is disabled, and you only use HTTPS, then you're not really transmitting the password as plain text anyway.

8

Hash client side. Why? Let me tell you about a little experiment. Walk up to computer in company cafeteria. Open browser to company web site login page (https). Press F12, click network tab, check off persist log, minimize console but leave web page open to login page. Sit down and eat lunch. Watch as employee after employee logs on to the company web site and being a good little worker logs out when done. Finish lunch, sit down at computer bring up network tab and see every single username and password in plain text in the form bodys.

No special tools, no special knowledge, no fancy hacking hardware, no keyloggers just good old F12.

But hey, keep thinking all you need is SSL. The bad guys will love you for it.

  • 3
    Your cafeteria comment doesn't make any sense, no matter how much I re-read it. Why would people just walk up to a computer and type their credentials? What are you trying to prove? Also, hashing won't make this more insecure, in any way. It was a common thing to hash passwords and transmit them over plain-text HTTP when this question was written, in 2009. – WhyNotHugo Jul 26 '17 at 0:32
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    I upvoted both of these because, yes, the accepted answer is being read many years later. It would be good if @CodeDog would please point to some mitigation strategy. And yes, people will just walk up to random PCs, for example, in the local library, and enter their details! – JoeAC Jul 26 '17 at 5:17
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    I encrypt passwords client side with a public key, then post only the encrypted password in the form. It is an asymmetrical key so having the client side public key is useless for the attackers. Every log it generates a new key pair so replay attacks wont work either. The key even changes on failed log in attempts. The key pairs are generated server side when the users arrives at the log in screen. Only the public key is provided to the client side code. – CodeDog Jul 29 '17 at 6:11
  • BTW I have seen this hack being used at a hotel business center by staff in order to gather passcodes for room numbers. They would use the passcode to get on the wireless and to use the business center pcs and it would be billed to the room. – CodeDog Jul 29 '17 at 6:17
  • I performed such an experiment myself loging into my bank account and must agree with @CodeDog - Request payload include my login and password both plaintext. – Artur Michajluk Jan 15 '18 at 15:10
5

The other posters are correct. Now that you're using SSL to encrypt the transmission of the password, make sure you're hashing it with a good algorithm and salt so it's protected when it's at rest, too...

  • Yes, I realize this, thanks, I was merely referring to the transmission here. – WhyNotHugo Jun 7 '09 at 16:43
1

Let’s make some notes to previous answers.

First, it’s probably not the best idea to use hash algorithms client side. If your password is salted on the server side, you won’t be able to compare hashes (at least not if you don’t store the client hash in the database in one of the hashing layers from the password, which is the same or worse). And you don’t want to implement the hashing algorithm used by the database on the client side, it would be silly.

Second, trading off cryptographic keys aren’t ideal either. The MITM could theoretically (considering he has a root cert installed on the client) change the cryptographic keys, and change with his own keys:

Original connection (not considering tls) from a theoretical server that exchanges keys:

Client request public keys > server holds the private keys, generate public keys to client > server sends public keys to client

Now, in a theoretical MITM atrack:

Client request public keys > MITM generates fake private keys > Server holds the private keys, generate public keys to client > MITM receives the public keys from the original server, now, we’re free to send our fake public keys to the client, and whenever a request comes from the client, we will decrypt the client data with the fake keys, change the payload (or read it) and encrypt with the original public keys > MITM sends fake public keys to client.

That’s the point of having trusted CA certificate in TLS, and that’s how you receive a message from the browser warning if the certificate isn’t valid.

In response to the OP: in my humble opinion you can’t do that, because sooner or later, someone will want to attack a user from your service and will try to break your protocol.

What you can do, however, is to implement 2FA to prevent people from ever trying to login with the same password. Beaware of replay attacks, though.

I’m not great with cryptography, please correct me if I’m wrong.

  • Keep in mind that this discussion is from 2009. These were pretty much the best practices at the time. – WhyNotHugo Aug 26 '18 at 18:59
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    @WhyNotHugo I’m aware. I decided to leave an answer because the top google answer to this question led me here, so why not. – Lucca Ferri Aug 26 '18 at 19:30

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