60

Is there any way to get milliseconds out of a timestamp in MySql or PostgreSql (or others just out of curiosity)?

SELECT CURRENT_TIMESTAMP
--> 2012-03-08 20:12:06.032572

Is there anything like this:

SELECT CURRENT_MILLISEC
--> 1331255526000

or the only alternative is to use the DATEDIFF from the era?

  • FROM_UNIXTIME(UNIX_TIMESTAMP(CONCAT(DATE(NOW()), ' ', CURTIME(3))); will create a timestamp with milliseconds. Adjust the parameter in curtime to alter the number of decimals. – user1119648 Aug 25 '16 at 13:18
  • @user1119648 - Which DB? Doesn't any DB with CURTIME(3) also support NOW(3)? So CONCAT(DATE(NOW()), ' ', CURTIME(3)) could just be NOW(3), at least in MySQL 5.6.4+ Also, FROM_UNIXTIME and UNIX_TIMESTAMP are inverse of each other, so FROM_UNIXTIME( UNIX_TIMESTAMP( whatever ) ) results in whatever. Isn't your long expression the same as NOW(3)? – ToolmakerSteve Apr 13 '17 at 12:58

17 Answers 17

34

To get the Unix timestamp in seconds in MySQL:

select UNIX_TIMESTAMP();

Details: http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.5/en/date-and-time-functions.html#function_unix-timestamp

Not tested PostgreSQL, but according to this site it should work: http://www.raditha.com/postgres/timestamp.php

select round( date_part( 'epoch', now() ) );
  • 27
    Isn't this accurate to the second? – Matt Esch Mar 8 '12 at 20:25
  • 1
    This is to the second. I Mis-read the question I think. I don't think MySQL returns milliseconds, but it should be able to handle them if you provide them: stackoverflow.com/questions/2572209/… – Billy Moon Mar 8 '12 at 20:34
  • Tested in postgreSQL, works but it returns a rounded value in seconds instead of a millisecond accurate value as bigint. See my answer for the solution in postgreSQL : stackoverflow.com/a/28760763/3197383 – Rémi Becheras Feb 27 '15 at 8:48
50

For MySQL (5.6+) you can do this:

SELECT ROUND(UNIX_TIMESTAMP(CURTIME(4)) * 1000)

Which will return (e.g.):

1420998416685 --milliseconds
  • 1
    Unreliable in a DST timezone! (Wrong for an hour every year) – Doin Nov 25 '18 at 0:39
34

In mysql, it is possible to use the uuid function to extract milliseconds.

select conv( 
            concat(
                   substring(uid,16,3), 
                   substring(uid,10,4), 
                   substring(uid,1,8))
                   ,16,10) 
            div 10000 
            - (141427 * 24 * 60 * 60 * 1000) as current_mills
from (select uuid() uid) as alias;

Result:

+---------------+
| current_mills |
+---------------+
| 1410954031133 |
+---------------+

It also works in older mysql versions!

Thank you to this page: http://rpbouman.blogspot.com.es/2014/06/mysql-extracting-timstamp-and-mac.html

  • 4
    At first I laughed, but it's the only way I've found so far to get the exact time in MySQL 5.5... so thats the solution :) Cheers. – Elliot Chance Oct 29 '14 at 2:53
  • 1
    Wow - this is great! I hope they never fix this behaviour. – Billy Moon Dec 1 '15 at 21:32
  • if you need just the MICROSECONDS, then you can use: SELECT SUBSTR( CONV( CONCAT( SUBSTR(uid,16,3), SUBSTR(uid,10,4), SUBSTR(uid,1,8)), 16, 10) DIV 10, -6) FROM (SELECT UUID() AS uid) AS alias; – lsblsb Nov 3 '16 at 12:08
11

In Mysql 5.7+ you can execute

select current_timestamp(6)

for more details

https://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.7/en/fractional-seconds.html

8

The correct way of extracting miliseconds from a timestamp value on PostgreSQL accordingly to current documentation is:

SELECT date_part('milliseconds', current_timestamp);

--OR

SELECT EXTRACT(MILLISECONDS FROM current_timestamp);

with returns: The seconds field, including fractional parts, multiplied by 1000. Note that this includes full seconds.

  • Thanks Falco, sorry I wasn't clear but I actually needed the current timestamp in milliseconds.. See example – Marsellus Wallace Mar 9 '12 at 14:59
  • Your solution returns the number of milliseconds from the start of the day, not from 1970/01/17. See my answer for the solution in postgreSQL : stackoverflow.com/a/28760763/3197383 – Rémi Becheras Feb 27 '15 at 8:50
8

The main misunderstanding in MySQL with timestamps is that MySQL by default both returns and stores timestamps without a fractional part.

SELECT current_timestamp()  => 2018-01-18 12:05:34

which can be converted to seconds timestamp as

SELECT UNIX_TIMESTAMP(current_timestamp()) => 1516272429

To add fractional part:

SELECT current_timestamp(3) => 2018-01-18 12:05:58.983

which can be converted to microseconds timestamp as

SELECT CAST( 1000*UNIX_TIMESTAMP(current_timestamp(3)) AS UNSIGNED INTEGER) ts => 1516272274786

There are few tricks with storing in tables. If your table was created like

    CREATE TABLE `ts_test_table` (
      `id` int(1) NOT NULL,
      `not_fractional_timestamp` timestamp NULL DEFAULT CURRENT_TIMESTAMP,
      PRIMARY KEY (`id`)
    ) ENGINE=InnoDB DEFAULT CHARSET=utf8mb4 COLLATE=utf8mb4_unicode_ci;

than MySQL will NOT store fractional part within it:

    id, not_fractional_timestamp
    1,  2018-01-18 11:35:12

If you want to add fractional part into your table, you need to create your table in another way:

    CREATE TABLE `ts_test_table2` (
      `id` int(1) NOT NULL,
      `some_data` varchar(10) COLLATE utf8mb4_unicode_ci NOT NULL,
      `fractional_timestamp` timestamp(3) NULL DEFAULT CURRENT_TIMESTAMP(3) ON UPDATE CURRENT_TIMESTAMP(3),
      PRIMARY KEY (`id`)
    ) ENGINE=InnoDB DEFAULT CHARSET=utf8mb4 COLLATE=utf8mb4_unicode_ci;

that leads to required result:

    id, some_data, fractional_timestamp
    1,  8,         2018-01-18 11:45:40.811

current_timestamp() function is allowed to receive value up to 6, but I've found out (at least in my installed MySQL 5.7.11 version on Windows) that fraction precision 6 leads to the same constant value of 3 digits at the tail, in my case 688

    id, some_data, fractional_timestamp
    1,  2,         2018-01-18 12:01:54.167688
    2,  4,         2018-01-18 12:01:58.893688

That means that really usable timestamp precision of MySQL is platform-dependent:

  • on Windows: 3
  • on Linux: 6
6

Use:

Select curtime(4);

This will give you milliseconds.

  • 4
    Also make sure that the DATETIME column is of length 6, where this is stored. Also you need MySQL 5.6.x to work with milliseconds. – TanuAD Aug 21 '13 at 16:36
  • Gives '11:08:31.1845' so doesn't include the date – malhal Nov 14 '14 at 11:08
  • @malhal is correct, doesn't give the number of milliseconds as the questions requested. – MCToon Jun 14 '16 at 19:15
  • In MySQL > 5.6 use - SELECT NOW(4); – TanuAD Jul 3 '16 at 2:27
4

None of these responses really solve the problem in postgreSQL, i.e :

getting the unix timestamp of a date field in milliseconds

I had the same issue and tested the different previous responses without satisfying result.

Finally, I found a really simple way, probably the simplest :

SELECT (EXTRACT (EPOCH FROM <date_column>::timestamp)::float*1000 as unix_tms
FROM <table>

namely :

  • We extract the pgSQL EPOCH, i.e. unix timestamp in floatting seconds from our column casted in timestamp prudence (in some complexe queries, pgSQL could trow an error if this cast isn't explicit. See )
  • then we cast it in float and multiply it by 1000 to get the value in milliseconds
3

In PostgreSQL you can use :

SELECT extract(epoch from now());

on MySQL :

SELECT unix_timestamp(now());
  • 4
    On MySQL that's only accurate to the second, not the millisecond. – Jeffrey Van Alstine Feb 28 '14 at 19:49
  • In postgreSQL, you solution returns the unix timestamp in fractional seconds. See my response to get it in milliseconds as bigint : stackoverflow.com/a/28760763/3197383 – Rémi Becheras Feb 27 '15 at 8:53
  • Never use UNIX_TIMESTAMP() with NOW(), because this will be handled as a local time and fail at the last hour of the daylight saving time! – Bazardshoxer Nov 1 at 16:45
3

Here's an expression that works for MariaDB and MySQL >= 5.6:

SELECT (UNIX_TIMESTAMP(NOW()) * 1000000 + MICROSECOND(NOW(6))) AS unix_now_in_microseconds;

This relies on the fact that NOW() always returns the same time throughout a query; it's possible that a plain UNIX_TIMESTAMP() would work as well, I'm not sure based on the documentation. It also requires MySQL >= 5.6 for the new precision argument for NOW() function (MariaDB works too).

  • 1
    UNIX_TIMESTAMP(NOW()) will be incorrect for an hour at the end of daylight savings, if you're in a DST timezone. Just use UNIX_TIMESTAMP() instead and the answer works, although I'm not 100% sure what happens during leap-seconds. – Doin Nov 24 '18 at 22:59
2

Easiest way I found to receive current time in milliseconds in MySql:

SELECT (UNIX_TIMESTAMP(NOW(3)) * 1000)

Since MySql 5.6.

  • 1
    Anyone who downvoted, what's wrong with this answer? It works as far as I can tell, just be aware of the fact that it returns a decimal number ending with .000 instead of an integer. – Benjamin Dec 19 '14 at 14:42
  • Gives incorrect results during the end of daylight savings, if in a DST timezone! – Doin Nov 24 '18 at 22:56
1

In MariaDB you can use

SELECT NOW(4);

To get milisecs. See here, too.

0

I felt the need to continue to refine, so in MySQL:

Current timestamp in milliseconds:

floor(unix_timestamp(current_timestamp(3)) * 1000)

Timestamp in milliseconds from given datetime(3):

floor(unix_timestamp("2015-04-27 15:14:55.692") * 1000)

Convert timestamp in milliseconds to datetime(3):

from_unixtime(1430146422456 / 1000)

Convert datetime(3) to timestamp in milliseconds:

floor(unix_timestamp("2015-04-27 14:53:42.456") * 1000)
  • 1
    In a daylight-savings timezone, your first example will be wrong (by an hour) one hour out of every year. Better to use UNIX_TIMESTAMP()*1000+FLOOR(MICROSECONDS(UTC_TIME(3))*0.001) – Doin Nov 25 '18 at 1:31
0

In PostgreSQL we use this approach:

SELECT round(EXTRACT (EPOCH FROM now())::float*1000)
0

For everyone here, just listen / read the comments of Doin very good! The UNIX_TIMESTAMP() function will, when a datatime-string is given, contact a local time, based on the timezone of the MySQL Connection or the server, to a unix timestamp. When in a different timezone and dealing with daylight savings, one hour per year, this will go wrong!

For example, in the Netherlands, the last Sunday of October, a second after reaching 02:59:59 for the first time, the time will be set back to 02:00:00 again. When using the NOW(), CURTIME() or SYSDATE()-functions from MySQL and passing it to the UNIX_TIMESTAMP() function, the timestamps will be wrong for a whole our.

For example, on Satudray 27th of October 2018, the time and timestamps went like this:

Local time                        |  UTC Time                 |  Timestamp   |  Timestamp using MYSQL's UNIX_TIMESTAMP(NOW(4))
----------------------------------+---------------------------+--------------+-----------------------------------------------------
2018-10-27 01:59:59 CET (+02:00)  |  2018-10-26 23:59:59 UTC  |  1540598399  |  1540598399
2018-10-27 02:00:00 CET (+02:00)  |  2018-10-27 00:00:00 UTC  |  1540598400  |  1540598400 + 1 second
2018-10-27 02:59:59 CET (+02:00)  |  2018-10-27 00:59:59 UTC  |  1540601999  |  1540601999 
2018-10-27 03:00:00 CET (+02:00)  |  2018-10-27 01:00:00 UTC  |  1540602000  |  1540602000 + 1 second
2018-10-27 03:59:59 CET (+02:00)  |  2018-10-27 01:59:59 UTC  |  1540605599  |  1540605599
2018-10-27 04:00:00 CET (+02:00)  |  2018-10-27 02:00:00 UTC  |  1540605600  |  1540605600 + 1 second

But on Sunday 27th of October 2019, when we've adjusted the clock one hour. Because the local time, doensn't include information whether it's +02:00 or +01:00, converting the time 02:00:00 the first time and the second time, both give the same timestamp (from the second 02:00:00) when using MYSQL's UNIX_TIMESTAMP(NOW(4)) function. So, when checking the timestamps in the database, it did this: +1 +1 +3601 +1 +1 ... +1 +1 -3599 +1 +1 etc.

Local time                        |  UTC Time                 |  Timestamp   |  Timestamp using MYSQL's UNIX_TIMESTAMP(NOW(4))
----------------------------------+---------------------------+--------------+-----------------------------------------------------
2019-10-27 01:59:59 CET (+02:00)  |  2019-10-26 23:59:59 UTC  |  1572134399  |  1572134399
2019-10-27 02:00:00 CET (+02:00)  |  2019-10-27 00:00:00 UTC  |  1572134400  |  1572138000 + 3601 seconds
2019-10-27 02:59:59 CET (+02:00)  |  2019-10-27 00:59:59 UTC  |  1572137999  |  1572141599
2019-10-27 02:00:00 CET (+01:00)  |  2019-10-27 01:00:00 UTC  |  1572138000  |  1572138000 - 3599 seconds
2019-10-27 02:59:59 CET (+01:00)  |  2019-10-27 01:59:59 UTC  |  1572141599  |  1572141599
2019-10-27 03:00:00 CET (+01:00)  |  2019-10-27 02:00:00 UTC  |  1572141600  |  1572141600 + 1 second

Relaying on the UNIX_TIMESTAMP()-function from MySQL when converting local times, unfortunately, is very unreliable! Instead of using SELECT UNIX_TIMESTAMP(NOW(4)), we're now using the code below, which seams to solve the issue.

SELECT ROUND(UNIX_TIMESTAMP() + (MICROSECOND(UTC_TIME(6))*0.000001), 4)
-1

I faced the same issue recently and I created a small github project that contains a new mysql function UNIX_TIMESTAMP_MS() that returns the current timestamp in milliseconds.

Also you can do the following :

SELECT UNIX_TIMESTAMP_MS(NOW(3)) or SELECT UNIX_TIMESTAMP_MS(DateTimeField)

The project is located here : https://github.com/silviucpp/unix_timestamp_ms

To compile you need to Just run make compile in the project root.

Then you need to only copy the shared library in the /usr/lib/mysql/plugin/ (or whatever the plugin folder is on your machine.)

After this just open a mysql console and run :

CREATE FUNCTION UNIX_TIMESTAMP_MS RETURNS INT SONAME 'unix_timestamp_ms.so';

I hope this will help, Silviu

  • After a round of refactoring I succeed to have way better performances than the builtin UNIX_TIMESTAMP function – silviu Jul 9 '16 at 19:40
  • Given that you are linking to code you've copyrighted, please clarify the license terms. Ideally, by adding a license file to your github repository. See github.com/blog/1530-choosing-an-open-source-license – ToolmakerSteve Apr 13 '17 at 12:34
  • @ToolmakerSteve thanks ! I added the license – silviu Apr 14 '17 at 6:44
  • 1
    Does this work more like NOW() or SYSDATE(), i.e. is it fixed over the duration of a statement, or does each reference to it (say when inserting into multiple rows) use an up-to-date value? – Doin Nov 25 '18 at 0:45
  • the reference does not exist. – thatprogrammerdude Sep 3 at 18:50
-1

Do as follows for milliseconds:

select round(date_format(CURTIME(3), "%f")/1000)

You can get microseconds by the following:

select date_format(CURTIME(6), "%f")

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