29

Unicode 6.0 added several characters with descriptions that suggest those characters are supposed to be rendered in a specific color:

  • RED APPLE U+1F34E
  • GREEN APPLE U+1F34F

  • BLUE HEART U+1F499

  • GREEN HEART U+1F49A
  • YELLOW HEART U+1F49B
  • PURPLE HEART U+1F49C

  • GREEN BOOK U+1F4D7

  • BLUE BOOK U+1F4D8
  • ORANGE BOOK U+1F4D9

  • LARGE RED CIRCLE U+1F534

  • LARGE BLUE CIRCLE U+1F535

  • LARGE ORANGE DIAMOND U+1F536

  • LARGE BLUE DIAMOND U+1F537
  • SMALL ORANGE DIAMOND U+1F538
  • SMALL BLUE DIAMOND U+1F539

  • UP-POINTING RED TRIANGLE U+1F53A

  • DOWN-POINTING RED TRIANGLE U+1F53B
  • UP-POINTING SMALL RED TRIANGLE U+1F53C
  • DOWN-POINTING SMALL RED TRIANGLE U+1F53D

I had thought font symbols were always grayscale.

Did the unicode authors forsee that these might be rendered in different colors?
Within the official unicode.org PDFs (http://www.unicode.org/charts/PDF/U1F300.pdf), these are portrayed only as having different types of crosshatching.

Is there any current mechanism that would allow for specific characters to be rendered in a specific color, based only on its codepoint, and not any other rich-text formatting? (eg. a color property within TrueType or OpenType font files)

29

From the Unicode FAQ: Emoji and Dingbats, bolding mine:

Q: What about characters whose name specifies a color?

A: Some of the characters from the core emoji sets have names that include a color term, for example, BLUE HEART or ORANGE BOOK. These color terms in the names do not imply any requirement about how a character must be presented; they are intended only to help identify the corresponding character in the core emoji sets. Even names of symbols such as BLACK MEDIUM SQUARE or WHITE MEDIUM SQUARE are not meant to indicate that the corresponding character must be presented in black or white, respectively; rather, the use of black and white is generally just to contrast filled versus outline shapes, or a darker color fill versus a lighter color fill. [PE]

There was quite a bit of debate on the mailing lists at the time on whether these should be named with colors, or generic names that didn't reference color, and whether that was setting a bad precendent. The Emoji Symbols: Background Data includes "old names" such as APPLE-1 instead of RED APPLE and BOOK-3 instead of ORANGE BOOK.

The final names use this principle:

Symbols with an inherent color shall bear this color in their name unless the entity denoted by the name has identifies the color anyway (e.g., a BANANA is uniquely yellow and therefore does not need to be called YELLOW BANANA, while a RED APPLE must be named so as there are also green apples).

  • The creation of this question implies to me that the decision to include colors in names was an incorrect one. – Daniel Sokolowski Jun 12 '18 at 14:22
5

Unicode 6.1 have a feature to change glyph for the same unicode code point, by specifying Variation Selector(U+FE0x).

For example, left-pointing triangle(@"\U000025C0") can be colored by adding "\U0000FE0F"(looks default on Mac OS X 10.8) and non-colored by adding "\U0000FE0E" as suffix. (@"\U000025C0\U0000FE0E").

  • 3
    Your answer is misleading. – The Variation Selectors you mention are for “text style” (U+FE0E) and “emoji style” (U+FE0F). They can only be used for Standardized Variants, not for any code point in general. – The emoji style is indeed usually colored, but no further influence can be exercised on the code point level. – Robert Siemer Jun 8 '14 at 20:41
4

I don't know that there's any standard mechanism for colored fonts, but obviously there are colored fonts. For example, the emoji font in iOS and OS X. Emoji characters in any text view on OS X will result in colored symbols, and they won't be affected by choosing a text color. These emoji even show up in Terminal.app.

enter image description here

(From this page.)

  • 4
    Very interesting. The file "Apple Color Emoji.ttf" seems to use proprietary extensions to embed color bitmapped images. – Dee Newcum Mar 12 '12 at 18:37
4

From The OpenType Font File in the OpenType specification:

Tables Related to Color Fonts

  • COLR: Color table
  • CPAL: Color palette table
  • CBDT: Color bitmap data
  • CBLC: Color bitmap location data
  • sbix: Standard bitmap graphics
  • SVG: The SVG (Scalable Vector Graphics) table

In short,

  • CBDT+CBLC contain colored bitmaps (in PNG). They are proposed by Google.

  • sbix contains colored bitmaps (in JPG, PNG, or TIFF). It is proposed by Apple.

  • COLR defines one or more accompanying color glyphs (in vector format) for each glyph, and when they are overlapped they create the final colored glyph. CPAL defines several color themes (dark-on-white, white-on-dark, ...) since COLR is merely paletted images. COLR+CPAL is proposed by Microsoft.

  • SVG is proposed by Mozilla and Adobe. It may be used with CPAL.

FreeType (used by Android, macOS and iOS) supports CBDT/CBLC and sbix since version 2.5 and 2.5.1. DirectWrite (used by Windows) supports all four above.

See also https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/OpenType#Color

Your Answer

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.