3

Suppose you have a query that looks like so:

SELECT * FROM client
WHERE identifyingnumber LIKE '%86%'

Sometimes there might be an exact match, meaning the identifyingnumber is 86. What's the best way of making the record with that exact match to the top of the query?

3 Answers 3

7

Consider that the exact match must be the shortest in string length of all the matches.

SELECT * 
FROM client
WHERE identifyingnumber LIKE '%86%'
ORDER BY LEN(identifyingnumber)

This will be a CPU-high query because of the LEN operation. You might consider creating a column for the length of identifyingnumber in the client table - possibly as a calculated column - to save some CPU on the select.

As for what is best-- It kind of depends on your system. The UNION option offered by Paolo was the first thing that came to mind for me, too, except that requires handling two different parameter values, assuming you parameterize your queries (as I always do).

0
4

maybe not the most elegant way, but it should work:

SELECT *
FROM
(
SELECT *, 1 AS PRIO FROM client
WHERE identifyingnumber = '86'
UNION
SELECT *, 2 AS PRIO FROM client
WHERE identifyingnumber LIKE '%86%'
AND identifyingnumber <>'86'
) AS X
ORDER BY PRIO
0
4

One way:

SELECT *, 
    CASE 
        WHEN identifyingnumber = '86' THEN 1
        WHEN identifyingnumber LIKE '86%' THEN 2
        ELSE 3
    END AS Rank
FROM client
WHERE identifyingnumber LIKE '%86%'
ORDER BY Rank

e.g. this gives a few levels of ranking

Or...

SELECT *
FROM client
WHERE identifyingnumber LIKE '%86%'
ORDER BY 
    CASE WHEN identifyingnumber = '86' THEN 1 
        WHEN identifyingnumber LIKE '86%' THEN 2 ELSE 3 END
4
  • 1
    Ugh. This right here is why I love MySQL... ORDER BY identifyingnumber = '86' DESC just works, not this jumping through hoops.
    – Amadan
    Mar 8, 2012 at 23:01
  • @Amadan - closest to that in TSQL is per the update to my answer
    – AdaTheDev
    Mar 8, 2012 at 23:05
  • @Amadan I didn't know about that.. very cool! I use MySQL at work as well for our eCommerce product. Mar 9, 2012 at 18:00
  • 1
    @MacGyver: Yeah, booleans in MySQL are 1 or 0, so if you sort a boolean (as in, a result of a comparison op) by ASC, you're going from false to true. DESC puts true on top (1, then 0). Trivial, yet useful.
    – Amadan
    Mar 9, 2012 at 19:19

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