In my Django app, I need to get the host name from the referrer in request.META.get('HTTP_REFERER') along with its protocol so that from URLs like:

I should get:

I looked over other related questions and found about urlparse, but that didn't do the trick since

>>> urlparse(request.META.get('HTTP_REFERER')).hostname
'docs.google.com'

11 Answers 11

up vote 179 down vote accepted

You should be able to do it with urlparse (docs: python2, python3):

from urllib.parse import urlparse
# from urlparse import urlparse  # Python 2
parsed_uri = urlparse('http://stackoverflow.com/questions/1234567/blah-blah-blah-blah' )
result = '{uri.scheme}://{uri.netloc}/'.format(uri=parsed_uri)
print(result)

# gives
'http://stackoverflow.com/'
  • this answer adds a / to the third example http://www.domain.com, but I think this might be a shortcoming of the question, not of the answer. – SingleNegationElimination Mar 9 '12 at 1:36
  • @TokenMacGuy: ya, my bad... didn't notice the missing / – Gerard Mar 9 '12 at 3:16
  • 6
    urlparse.urlparse() returns a namedtuple-like result; you could use {uri.scheme}://{uri.netloc}/'.format(uri=parsed_uri) for readability. – jfs Jun 9 '13 at 2:09
  • 9
    I don't think this is a good solution, as netloc is not domain: try urlparse.urlparse('http://user:pass@example.com:8080') and find it gives parts like 'user:pass@' and ':8080' – starrify Oct 21 '14 at 8:02
  • 17
    The urlparse module is renamed to urllib.parse in Python 3. So, from urllib.parse import urlparse – SparkAndShine Jul 21 '15 at 21:37

https://github.com/john-kurkowski/tldextract

This is a more verbose version of urlparse. It detects domains and subdomains for you.

From their documentation:

>>> import tldextract
>>> tldextract.extract('http://forums.news.cnn.com/')
ExtractResult(subdomain='forums.news', domain='cnn', suffix='com')
>>> tldextract.extract('http://forums.bbc.co.uk/') # United Kingdom
ExtractResult(subdomain='forums', domain='bbc', suffix='co.uk')
>>> tldextract.extract('http://www.worldbank.org.kg/') # Kyrgyzstan
ExtractResult(subdomain='www', domain='worldbank', suffix='org.kg')

ExtractResult is a namedtuple, so it's simple to access the parts you want.

>>> ext = tldextract.extract('http://forums.bbc.co.uk')
>>> ext.domain
'bbc'
>>> '.'.join(ext[:2]) # rejoin subdomain and domain
'forums.bbc'
  • The best answer, tested on python35 – Minion May 10 at 20:52
  • 1
    This is the correct answer for the question as written, how to get the DOMAIN name. The chosen solution provides the HOSTNAME, which I believe is what the author wanted in the first place. – Scone Jul 18 at 18:29

Python3 using urlsplit:

from urllib.parse import urlsplit
url = "http://stackoverflow.com/questions/9626535/get-domain-name-from-url"
base_url = "{0.scheme}://{0.netloc}/".format(urlsplit(url))
print(base_url)
# http://stackoverflow.com/

Pure string operations :):

>>> url = "http://stackoverflow.com/questions/9626535/get-domain-name-from-url"
>>> url.split("//")[-1].split("/")[0].split('?')[0]
'stackoverflow.com'
>>> url = "stackoverflow.com/questions/9626535/get-domain-name-from-url"
>>> url.split("//")[-1].split("/")[0].split('?')[0]
'stackoverflow.com'
>>> url = "http://foo.bar?haha/whatever"
>>> url.split("//")[-1].split("/")[0].split('?')[0]
'foo.bar'

That's all, folks.

  • Good and simple option, but fails in some cases, e.g. foo.bar?haha – Simon Steinberger Dec 13 '17 at 22:02
  • @SimonSteinberger :-) How'bout this : url.split("//")[-1].split("/")[0].split('?')[0] :-)) – SebMa Feb 5 at 16:16
>>> import urlparse
>>> url = 'http://stackoverflow.com/questions/1234567/blah-blah-blah-blah'
>>> urlparse.urljoin(url, '/')
'http://stackoverflow.com/'

Here is a slightly improved version:

urls = [
    "http://stackoverflow.com:8080/some/folder?test=/questions/9626535/get-domain-name-from-url",
    "Stackoverflow.com:8080/some/folder?test=/questions/9626535/get-domain-name-from-url",
    "http://stackoverflow.com/some/folder?test=/questions/9626535/get-domain-name-from-url",
    "https://StackOverflow.com:8080?test=/questions/9626535/get-domain-name-from-url",
    "stackoverflow.com?test=questions&v=get-domain-name-from-url"]
for url in urls:
    spltAr = url.split("://");
    i = (0,1)[len(spltAr)>1];
    dm = spltAr[i].split("?")[0].split('/')[0].split(':')[0].lower();
    print dm

Output

stackoverflow.com
stackoverflow.com
stackoverflow.com
stackoverflow.com
stackoverflow.com

Fiddle: https://pyfiddle.io/fiddle/23e4976e-88d2-4757-993e-532aa41b7bf0/?i=true

  • IMHO the best solution, because simple and it considers all sorts of rare cases. Thanks! – Simon Steinberger Dec 13 '17 at 22:03
  • neither simple nor improved – Corey Goldberg Aug 12 at 22:54

Is there anything wrong with pure string operations:

url = 'http://stackoverflow.com/questions/9626535/get-domain-name-from-url'
parts = url.split('//', 1)
print parts[0]+'//'+parts[1].split('/', 1)[0]
>>> http://stackoverflow.com

If you prefer having a trailing slash appended, extend this script a bit like so:

parts = url.split('//', 1)
base = parts[0]+'//'+parts[1].split('/', 1)[0]
print base + (len(url) > len(base) and url[len(base)]=='/'and'/' or '')

That can probably be optimized a bit ...

  • 6
    it's not wrong but we got a tool that already does the work, let's not reinvent the wheel ;) – Gerard Jun 12 '13 at 2:33
  • thank you for this easy and nice solution :) – Galina Alperovich Apr 26 '17 at 18:11

if you think your url is valid then this will work all the time

domain = "http://google.com".split("://")[1].split("/")[0]

This is a bit obtuse, but uses urlparse in both directions:

import urlparse
def uri2schemehostname(uri):
    urlparse.urlunparse(urlparse.urlparse(uri)[:2] + ("",) * 4)

that odd ("",) * 4 bit is because urlparse expects a sequence of exactly len(urlparse.ParseResult._fields) = 6

If it contains less than 3 slashes thus you've it got and if not then we can find the occurrence between it:

import re

link = http://forum.unisoftdev.com/something

slash_count = len(re.findall("/", link))
print slash_count # output: 3

if slash_count > 2:
   regex = r'\:\/\/(.*?)\/'
   pattern  = re.compile(regex)
   path = re.findall(pattern, url)

   print path

You can use the urlparse from the urllib library:

from urllib.parse import urlparse
o = urlparse("http://www.example.com/br/pages/")
domain = "://".join([o.scheme, o.netloc])

Your Answer

 

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.