28

I know I can do this in C++:

string s[] = {"hi", "there"};

But is there anyway to delcare an array this way without delcaring string s[]?

e.g.

void foo(string[] strArray){
  // some code
}

string s[] = {"hi", "there"}; // Works
foo(s); // Works

foo(new string[]{"hi", "there"}); // Doesn't work
2
  • 3
    why would you use dynamically allocated c-style arrays? I would suggest you use std::vector instead. When using c++11 you can construct them using initialization lists, e.g. void foo(vector<string>); foo({"hi", "there"}); should work in c++11
    – Grizzly
    Mar 8, 2012 at 23:42
  • Possible duplicate of Array of strings initialization in c++
    – jww
    Sep 17, 2018 at 5:51

4 Answers 4

18

In C++11 you can. A note beforehand: Don't new the array, there's no need for that.

First, string[] strArray is a syntax error, that should either be string* strArray or string strArray[]. And I assume that it's just for the sake of the example that you don't pass any size parameter.

#include <string>

void foo(std::string* strArray, unsigned size){
  // do stuff...
}

template<class T>
using alias = T;

int main(){
  foo(alias<std::string[]>{"hi", "there"}, 2);
}

Note that it would be better if you didn't need to pass the array size as an extra parameter, and thankfully there is a way: Templates!

template<unsigned N>
void foo(int const (&arr)[N]){
  // ...
}

Note that this will only match stack arrays, like int x[5] = .... Or temporary ones, created by the use of alias above.

int main(){
  foo(alias<int[]>{1, 2, 3});
}
9

Prior to C++11, you cannot initialise an array using type[]. However the latest c++11 provides(unifies) the initialisation, so you can do it in this way:

string* pStr = new string[3] { "hi", "there"};

See http://www2.research.att.com/~bs/C++0xFAQ.html#uniform-init

4

With support for C++11 initializer lists it is very easy:

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
#include <string>
using namespace std;

using Strings = vector<string>;

void foo( Strings const& strings )
{
    for( string const& s : strings ) { cout << s << endl; }
}

auto main() -> int
{
    foo( Strings{ "hi", "there" } ); 
}

Lacking that (e.g. for Visual C++ 10.0) you can do things like this:

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
#include <string>
using namespace std;

typedef vector<string> Strings;

void foo( Strings const& strings )
{
    for( auto it = begin( strings );  it != end( strings );  ++it )
    {
        cout << *it << endl;
    }
}

template< class Elem >
vector<Elem>& r( vector<Elem>&& o ) { return o; }

template< class Elem, class Arg >
vector<Elem>& operator<<( vector<Elem>& v, Arg const& a )
{
    v.push_back( a );
    return v;
}

int main()
{
    foo( r( Strings() ) << "hi" << "there" ); 
}
4
  • 1
    Much too verbose: use a range-based loop: for(auto s : strings) cout << s <<endl;
    – rwst
    Aug 17, 2015 at 5:44
  • @rwst: Yes, today it is. Thanks. I probably used iterators to support common Visual C++ in 2012. The simple loop you show has a slight inefficiency in that it copies strings but (1) that's insignificant compared to the io in the loop body and (2) it's anyway irrelevant, since it's not what this example is about, and (3) a rewrite for efficiency (not teaching bad idioms) is not hard to understand. So, as of 2015 I see no reason to keep the iterator loop I used. Feel free to fix. :) Aug 17, 2015 at 8:55
  • @rwst: OK I updated it myself. Also checked that the Visual C++ 10 example actually compiles with VC10. When I looked at it now I couldn't remember that VC10 supported rvalue references, but, it did (at least the code compiles and produces correct result). Aug 17, 2015 at 11:15
  • using Strings = vector<string> and typedef vector<string> Strings are so much unneeded and make reading code harder Mar 21, 2019 at 8:10
1

In C++11 and above, you can also initialize std::vector with an initializer list. For example:

using namespace std; // for example only

for (auto s : vector<string>{"one","two","three"} ) 
    cout << s << endl;

So, your example would become:

void foo(vector<string> strArray){
  // some code
}

vector<string> s {"hi", "there"}; // Works
foo(s); // Works

foo(vector<string> {"hi", "there"}); // also works

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